Social Sciences Course Listing

Use this course listing to view descriptions of the courses offered for the term indicated as well as other course information such as prerequisites (if applicable) dates, times and campus location when available. Some courses are offered only in specific terms.

To view all courses for this program, uncheck "Hide Courses Not Offered This Term." If a course you need is not offered this term, please contact the department to find out when it next will be offered.

This course covers the study of man. It is an introductory course covering the economic, cultural, social and political development and technology of primitive societies. Attitudes, approach to problems and the general way of life of primitive societies are compared with modern societies. The course also provides a brief introduction to the development of fossil man and archaeology. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course will explore the nature, characteristics and content of culture from an anthropological perspective by examining the economy, art, religion, politics, language and kinship patterns of individual human societies. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Credit for this course is also awarded to entering students with appropriate scores on the International Baccalaureate (IB) examination in Social Anthropology.
In this course, topics of current interest are presented in group instruction. This course may be taken four times for credit. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
This travel study course combines preparation on campus, foreign travel and study abroad in the discipline of anthropology with variable content depending on the specific program in which the student enrolls. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course examines the political dimensions of Islam within a regional and global context. The course will analyze the foundation of Islamic thought in society, the nature of the relationship between religious and political establishments, the roots of instability and conflict in the Middle East, and the problems generated by the conceptualization of the West vs. the "rest."
This course is a comparative survey of political structures, processes and institutions around the world, including western and non-western cultures, developed and underdeveloped countries, democratic and non-democratic governments, unitary and federal systems. Credit for this course is awarded to entering students with appropriate scores on the Advanced Placement (AP) examination in Government and Politics: Comparative.
This course is a comparative survey of political structures, processes and institutions around the world, including western and non-western cultures, developed and underdeveloped countries, democratic and non-democratic governments, unitary and federal systems. Credit for this course is awarded to entering students with appropriate scores on the Advanced Placement (AP) examination in Government and Politics: Comparative.
This course is designed for those students studying specialized topics in the area of comparative politics.
This course is designed for those students studying specialized topics in the area of comparative politics.
This course is designed for those students studying specialized topics in the area of comparative politics.
The nature of economics, production, distribution and price determination will be explored. Emphasis will be placed on practical application and policy determination. Current problems will be surveyed. The course is designed for non-business majors. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This is an introductory course covering the nature, scope and methods of economics, economic concepts and economic institutions. Emphasis is placed upon production, consumption, determination of prices, distribution of income, fiscal policy, national income determinants, money and banking and comparative economic systems. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for AA degree seeking students.
This is an introductory course covering the nature, scope and method of economics, economic concepts and institutions. Emphasis is placed upon production, consumption, determination of prices, distribution of income, fiscal policy, national income determinants, money and banking and comparative economic systems. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for AA degree seeking students.
This course deals primarily with economic problems. Emphasis is given to markets, production functions, economic role of government, agricultural problems, labor-management relations, imperfect competition, interest and capital, economic security, international trade and finance and economic development. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course deals primarily with economic problems. Emphasis is given to markets, production functions, economic role of government, agricultural problems, labor-management relations, imperfect competition, interest and capital, economic security, international trade and finance and economic development. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
In this course, topics of current interest are presented in group instruction. This course may be taken four times for credit. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is an introductory study of the human and natural resources of the major regions of the world. From each region, one or more countries are selected for study in depth. Political, cultural, economic and strategic comparisons are made. The current role of the United States in the areas studied receives particular attention. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is a systematic study of the physical elements of the Earth, including their interrelationships and importance to man and his activities. Basic explanations of physical features of the Earth, their form and origin, principles of weather, world climactic patterns, world vegetation patterns and the study of soil properties and classification into the great soil groups of the world are covered. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
In this course topics of current interest are presented in group instruction. This course may be taken four times for credit. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
This course is designed to study how the conventional self created by society, dubbed the social self by sociologists, is not capable of making our 21st century world more peaceful and equitable. In this course we will explore how the social self is formed around society's leading ideas, values and norms - all geared to privilege some groups while disadvantaging others. On the other hand, the course will examine our other self, the spiritual self, the self of our inner being and how its purpose is to transform society into a social environment where everyone can live a life of purpose and dignity. Specifically, in this course, students will explore how the spiritual self has fueled the emergence of a great global shift in consciousness, a fundamental change in our perceptions, core values, beliefs and priorities aimed to rescue and restore the natural, innate moral goodness and goodwill of our human species.
This course is an introduction to major issues and theories of world politics. Topics include state and non-state actors, the nature of power, causes of war and peace, terrorism, international organizations, finance and trade, economic development, globalization, human rights and environmental concerns. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is an introduction to major issues and theories of world politics. Topics include state and non-state actors, the nature of power, causes of war and peace, terrorism, international organizations, finance and trade, economic development, globalization, human rights and environmental concerns. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed for those students studying specialized topics in the area of international politics.
This course is designed for those students studying specialized topics in the area of international politics.
This course is designed for those students studying specialized topics in the area of international politics.
A travel/study course combining preparation on campus, foreign travel and study abroad in the discipline of international relations. Variable content depending on the program in which the student enrolls and the specific topics to be covered. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Students must be 18 years of age on or before departure.
In this course, we will examine how experiences of privilege and oppression are shaped by individual understandings, interpersonal interactions, groups, social constructions, societal structures and historical forces. Cultural, institutional and organizational contributions to privilege and oppression will be considered. From a standpoint of human rights, we will identify systems of oppression that need to be eradicated. We will address how privilege and oppression are maintained through mechanisms such as marginalization, exploitation, violence and cultural hegemony and will analyze various forms of personal and social action that can address injustice and produce change.
This course explores multiple dimensions of diversity. Addressing constructed myths about our collective past, it provides a social and historical viewpoint regarding diversity and inclusion in the United States. Utilizing perspectives such as conflict and critical theories, cognition theories, and intersectionality, it will examine the evolution of diversity and inclusion through changes in organizations, social institutions, law and public policy and through the efforts of various human rights movements.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
This course will explore the dynamics from a variety of frames. The course will provide a cursory overview of various issues such as conflict, violence, war, non-violence and peace. The course is intended to engage students in the theory and application addressing conflict, violence, war and terrorism. Students will examine approaches to peace, alternatives to war and to peace-building through peace studies and non-violence movements. The course will adopt the frame that we must review actions of the past in order to prevent recurrences. The student will draw upon the ideology of individuals identified as great peacemakers. While exploring great peacemakers, a focus on personal non-violence, ethical approaches to war, conflict transformation or peace and movements for social change will be conducted. Students will investigate local and international conflict, social movements and non-violent approaches to peace. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
Credit for this course is granted to students with scores of 45 or higher on the DSST Examination (DANTES) in Fundamentals of Counseling.
In this course basic aspects of the federal government are studied. Emphasis is placed upon content and interpretation of the Constitution, Federalism, the Congress, the Presidency, the federal court system and the citizen's connection to the federal government by means of elections, political parties, interest groups and public opinion. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for A.A. degree seeking students and the Florida state civic literacy requirement per Florida Statues Section 1007.25 for all students.
In this course, basic aspects of the federal government are studied. Emphasis is placed upon content and interpretation of the Constitution, Federalism, the Congress, the Presidency, the federal court system and the citizen's connection to the federal government by means of elections, political parties, interest groups and public opinion. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for A.A. degree seeking students and the Florida state civic literacy requirement per Florida Statues Section 1007.25 for all students.
In this course, functions of state, county and city governments are studied. Emphasis is placed upon constitutions, political parties, politics, legislatures, courts, chief executives and interrelationships between federal and state governments and metropolitan problems. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
The basic principles of political thought are studied in this course. Students will examine the state and the relationship between the individual and the state. Topics such as authority, consent, obligation, freedom, order, equality, justice and democracy.
The basic principles of political thought are studied in this course. Students will examine the state and the relationship between the individual and the state. Topics such as authority, consent, freedom and obligation are examined. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course includes a comparative survey of the social, political, economic and historical tenets and developments of contemporary political ideologies. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed for those students studying specialized topics in the area of political theory.
This course is designed for those students studying specialized topics in the area of political theory.
This course is designed for those students studying specialized topics in the area of political theory.
This travel/study course combines preparation on campus, foreign travel and study abroad in the discipline of political history and/or thought. Variable content depending on the program in which the student enrolls and the specific topics to be covered. Permission of instructor or dean is required. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course will expose the student to various policies and environmental regulations concerning air quality and dependence on foreign energy sources. Discussion will include enactment of policies, laws, regulations and programs with regard to conventional and alternative energy sources. Assessment of concerns over future depletion of global oil supplies and the impact to the U.S. economy will be discussed. The federal, state or local governmental response to issues concerning pollution and its impact on the number of environmental laws, the effectiveness of any proposed initiative and the extent of implementation and enforcement will be explored.
This course is work-based experience that provides students with supervised career exploration activities and/or practical experiences. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated at the discretion of the Career Development Center.
This course is a work-based experience that provides students with supervised career exploration activities and/or practical experiences. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated at the discretion of the Career Development Center.
This course is a work-based experience that provides students with supervised career exploration activities and/or practical experiences. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated at the discretion of the Career Development Center.
This course is a work-based experience that provides students with supervised career exploration activities and/or practical experiences. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated at the discretion of the Career Development Center.
This course is an introductory survey of sociology covering its scope, methods and general principles. Topics emphasized include group behavior, race relations, population, social institutions, social change and social stratification. The purpose of the course is to assist the student in acquiring an understanding of society. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course is an introductory survey of sociology covering its scope, methods and general principles. Topics emphasized include group behavior, race relations, population, social institutions, social change and social stratification. The purpose of the course is to assist the student in acquiring an understanding of society. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Note: This course contains Honors level material. Acceptance into the Honors Program or Permission from the Honors Director required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course is an in-depth analysis into the scope and causes of major problem areas from the perspective of both the individual and the community. Consideration will be given to various possible remedial approaches to each problem area. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is applied sociology that will pursue a unique, original research project each semester. It provides students with an in-depth understanding of social scientific research through experimental investigation. Utilizing the research project as a point of focus, this course includes training in all aspects of empirical research, including literature review, methodology, data collection, data coding, data analysis and presentation of results. Previous coursework in sociology or psychology is recommended. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director.
This course is designed to study the changing culture of our nation. Issues of race, ethnicity, gender, class, nationality and globalism will be explored. This course is also designed to provide information and strategies for living and working in a pluralistic, multi-cultural society. Values and ethics of diversity and commonality will be emphasized. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course will explore the dynamics of conflict from a variety of frames. Students will be provided with valuable insight about conflict that will help lead to an understanding regarding the conflicts they are likely to face in life, at school or work, in society as well as those they observe in national headlines. An introduction to the dispute resolution practices of mediation, facilitation and negotiation will be conducted. The examination of how one's gender and cultural perspective may influence the approach and outcome of the conflict will be discussed. Current trends and issues within the field of conflict management and resolution will be reviewed. The course will engage students in the theory and application of addressing conflict management and resolution on an individual, interpersonal and international perspective. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to present students with an interdisciplinary study of the sexual functioning of humans. Course information is drawn liberally from the disciplines of sociology, psychology and biology, providing students with an integrated introduction to the study of human sexual behavior. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is a historical and comparative study of courtship, mate selection, engagement, marriage, husband-wife relationships and child-rearing in the United States. Emphasis is placed upon the changing contemporary family with respect to social and economic status, sex, sources of marital conflict and social values. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
This course will examine normative deviance through the sociological lens. It will focus on the social context, behaviors and societal reactions associated with deviance. Criminal and noncriminal forms of deviance will be investigated using a variety of theoretical perspectives. In approaching deviance sociologically, this course will highlight the social constructions of deviance and the influence of social control and stigmatization as reactions to deviant behavior. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.

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