Public Safety Administration Bachelor of Science

First responders are the heroes among us, but even heroes need someone to take the lead and ensure operations run smoothly. Our Bachelor of Science in Public Safety Administration addresses the critical need for professionals to fill leadership roles that are necessary to serve and protect our community. With interpersonal and critical-thinking skills as well as exposure to real-world scenarios within the coursework for the degree, graduates of this program will be ready to enter the workforce or advance their career in the high-demand, high-skill fields of criminal justice, fire science and emergency medical services.

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Getting Started: Summer Full and
A Session

March 14:  Financial Aid


May 2:  Application


May 9:  Classes Begin

Other Important Dates »

Why Seminole State?

  • Unique program:  One-of-a-kind degree for Central Florida geared to train future leaders across a variety of agencies
  • Industry-driven curriculum:  Courses developed with input from the regional public safety (law enforcement, EMS and fire science) community
  • Online degree:  Degree offered 100% online, so you can study when and where you want
  • Dedicated faculty:  Quality instruction from faculty with industry experience as well as academic credentials
  • Affordable tuition:  Significantly lower costs than Florida's universities
  • Small class sizes:  Most classes have fewer than 30 students
Public Safety Administration
Type: Bachelor of Science
Major Code: PSA-BS
CIP: 1104399991

Program Description

Program Admission

Available Course Course Not Offered Fall 2022
This course is presented as a primer for skill development in research, data collection and formal research paper drafting on pertinent topics in the field of public safety. An analysis of social research methods with the coverage of statistical analysis to help students develop the applied research skills needed for future careers in public and private organizations will be included. This course is required to be taking in the first term of the Bachelor of Science in Public Safety Administration to gain skills in the completion of the program requirements.
This course is presented as an overview of the primary aspects of public safety management. Major administrative, managerial and leadership components of public safety organizations will be examined. Also addressed will be administrative concerns for special issues and challenges, such as coordinated public safety approaches, post-September 11, 2001 administrative world views, ethical foundations, critical thinking and analysis and innovative solutions for efficient public safety problems. The course will also provide the student with a framework for individual progress. This will include the beginning development of an individualized plan toward educational and career goals and preliminary planning to link continuous learning with the capstone course at the end of the program.
This course studies the process and implementation of comprehensive emergency management plans for incident management and security measures, including the continuity of operations for all levels of government and all sectors of the community. Incorporated in the course content will be a study of empirical vs. theoretical approaches, human behavior in disaster situations and the myths vs. the realities in emergency planning. An examination of group disaster behavior will be completed as well as students will have an understanding of community, cultures and varied social systems in relation to disaster planning.
This course will include an overview of homeland security laws and regulations, public safety requirements and policies, privacy rights in the context of security concerns, human resource issues, organizational structure and management priorities. Students will explore the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) role in policy, law and management of manmade disasters. Local and regional perspectives pertinent to criminal justice agencies will be examined.
This course introduces students to the Critical Infrastructure Protection (CIP) process to secure effective protection of people, physical entities and cyber-based systems. This course guides leaders in the systematic protection of critical infrastructures. Topics include decision sequences, time-efficient and resource-restrained practices that ensure protection continuity of operations, as well as mission success. Included will be an investigation of the importance of risk analysis and an introduction to the procedures for community hazard assessments. Topics related to the design of proper detection and deterrence procedures and equipment will be covered. Particular emphasis will be placed on governing doctrine such as the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), National Response Framework (NRF), National Incident Management System (NIMS) and the National Preparedness Guidelines.
This course focuses on the integration of knowledge, skills and abilities learned in the program through a capstone project. This course should be taken during the last semester of the program. The course will involve the student proposing a plan for public safety managers to utilize when handling a catastrophic event occurring in a community. The student will define the scope of the event and utilize concepts of disaster response as defined in prior program coursework from a public safety perspective. The project will culminate with a video presentation of the plan.

Choose one of the following Specializations:

21 Credits
This course provides an advanced study and critical appraisal of various theories of crime causation, including an examination of biological, psychological, economic and sociological perspectives on the etiology of crime. An examination of the causes, types and patterns of crime in society will be included. Major schools of thought and current research are introduced, compared and contrasted in the study of crime and its social context.
This course is an advanced examination of the criminal justice system in the United States with an emphasis on crime data, its strengths and weaknesses and its uses. This course provides students with a comprehensive knowledge of the history, philosophy and organization of the U.S. police, the U.S. courts and correctional institutions, including probation and parole, as well as a study of crime, law and the administration of criminal justice in the U.S.
This course provides an advanced study and critical examination of the American court system, focusing on understanding judicial and prosecutorial discretion in the context of the legal, organizational and practical processes of decision-making. It also analyzes the role of appellate courts in the criminal justice process, the rules of evidence and socio-political influences on the judicial process.
This course provides an advanced study of the history and current status of jails and adult prisons with emphasis on punishment rationales, institutional programs and procedures, inmates' social structures, correctional officers and correctional administration and contemporary issues in corrections.
This course provides an advanced study of the organization, management and administration of law enforcement agencies. Topics include police administration in the political arena, organizational theory, police organizational structure, leadership, organizational communication, police subsystem tasks, decision-making, performance evaluation and organizational improvement.
This advanced course provides an in-depth examination of both the practical and theoretical aspects of the administration of criminal justice agencies. Included will be an analysis of leadership styles, techniques in supervision, theories, practices and skills associated with managing personnel. Addressed are budgeting, organizational behavior, civil service, unions, manpower distribution, policy development and execution as applied in both small and large criminal justice agencies.
This course focuses on critical concerns facing American criminal justice agencies, including discretion, abuse of authority, the stress and strain on the CJ professional, civil liability, victimization, wrongful convictions, human trafficking and mental illness in relation to offenders.
This course introduces the student to the risk management principles of an EMS agency. Students will focus on safety from the perspective of the field provider.
This course is for students interested in the practice and principles of emergency medical services systems management and the processes that contribute to the effectiveness of day-to-day operations within an EMS organization. This course introduces the EMS professional to topics that include government structure, strategic planning, injury prevention, risk management and safety, customer service, human resources management, financial management, fleet management, career development, quality management, data collection and research labor relations and special operations.
This course introduces the student to the value of quality management principles in an EMS agency. Included will be an introduction to the benefits of quality improvement, an overview of the history of quality in EMS and methods of measuring quality in EMS.
This course is for students interested in the legal, political and regulatory environment of EMS. This course introduces the EMS professional to the legal aspects of Emergency Medical Services. Students explore issues in malpractice, consent and refusal of treatment, OSHA, employment issues and risk management. EMS students gain insight into the legal liabilities in Emergency Medical Services.
This course is an overview of the design and operation of EMS systems, delivery of services, and the echelons of care. The history of EMS, the interface of public and private organizations and review of the various personnel who comprise these systems will be examined in relation to their impact on the healthcare delivery system.
This course introduces the Fire or EMS professional to the benefits of community information and community relations. Students explore issues in marketing, crafting the message, identifying the audience, developing programs and creating press releases. This course includes a theoretical framework for the understanding of the ethical, sociological, organizational, political and legal components of community risk reduction and a methodology for the development of a comprehensive community risk reduction plan.
This is an upper-level baccalaureate course for students interested in the theory and practice of EMS education.
This course examines the legal aspects of the fire service and the political and social impacts of legal issues. This course includes a review of the American legal system and an in-depth coverage of legal and political issues involving employment and personnel matters, administrative and operational matters, planning and code enforcement, and legislative and political processes with regard to the fire service.
This course examines the basic principles of research and methodology for analyzing current fire-related research. This course also provides a framework for conducting and evaluating independent research in the following areas: fire dynamics, fire test standards and codes, fire safety, fire modeling, structural fire safety, life safety, firefighter health and safety, automatic detection and suppression, transportation fire hazards, risk analysis and loss control, fire service applied research and new trends in fire-related research.
This course empowers students with knowledge, methods and concepts for effective leadership of comprehensive fire-prevention and risk reduction programs.
This course is designed to be a progressive primer for students who want more knowledge about fire and emergency services administration. The course demonstrates the importance of the following skills that are necessary to manage and lead a fire and emergency services department through the challenges and changes of the 21st century: persuasion and influence, accountable budgeting, anticipation of challenges and the need for change, and using specific management tools for analyzing and solving problems. A central part of the course focuses on how the leadership of a fire and emergency services department develops internal and external cooperation to create a coordinated approach to achieving the department's mission.
This course examines relationships and issues in personnel administration and human resource development within the context of fire-related organizations, including personnel management, organizational development, productivity, recruitment and selection, performance management systems, discipline, and collective bargaining.
This course introduces the Fire or EMS professional to the benefits of community information and community relations. Students explore issues in marketing, crafting the message, identifying the audience, developing programs and creating press releases. This course includes a theoretical framework for the understanding of the ethical, sociological, organizational, political and legal components of community risk reduction and a methodology for the development of a comprehensive community risk reduction plan.
This course examines the basic principles of ethics as related to fire service operations and management with special attention given to current issues in the fire service.

Exclusive of courses with a number beginning with zero or courses designated as non-transfer.

Foundation Courses

An Associate in Science in Criminal Justice Technology from a regionally accredited institution satisfies the Foundation course requirements. Students entering with any other degree must complete the Foundation courses below:

This course consists of a survey of delinquent and criminal behavior patterns, including causation. Specific problems and selected case studies are examined.
This course consists of the history, examination and evaluation of the courts, the police and the correctional organizations of the criminal justice system in the United States today. Contemporary problems and possible solutions are also considered.
This course is designed to develop an understanding of the law enforcement profession. It examines the various approaches of modern law enforcement as well as a historical overview of law enforcement. It provides a description of policing and examines law enforcement as a balance of social, historical, political, legal, individual and organizational forces.
This course provides an understanding about balancing the power of government and the freedoms and privacy of citizens to allow the government enough power to serve and protect its citizens without unnecessarily invading individual rights.
This course is a study of corrections for students of criminal justice to enable them to understand the development and conduct of its complexity and scope historically, traditionally, operationally and legally.
This course identifies and defines principles and doctrines of law with emphasis on Florida criminal and civil statutes that provide sanctions for inappropriate behavior within our society.
The fundamental principles, concepts and theory of investigation, interviews, interrogations, surveillance and sources of information, case preparations, problems in criminal investigation and investigative techniques of specific crimes are explored in this course.

An Associate in Science in Emergency Medical Services from a regionally accredited institution satisfies the Foundation course requirements. Students entering with any other degree must complete 45 credits of EMS prefix courses.

Note: Students who hold a current Paramedic certification or license in Florida or another state will need to meet with the Program Manager to discuss articulation options.  

An Associate in Science in Fire Science Technology from a regionally accredited institution satisfies the Foundation course requirements. Students entering with any other degree must complete the Foundation courses below:

This course explores the theories and fundamentals of how and why fires start, spread and how they are controlled. This course is required for the U.S. Fire Administration Higher Education (FESHE) degree.
This course presents the fundamental concepts of building construction as they relate to how buildings burn. Students will learn how the ravages of fire affect wood, steel, concrete and composite construction. Emphasis is on avoiding human injury in each type of construction. This course is required for the U.S. Fire Administration Higher Education (FESHE) degree. This course is required for the Fire Safety Inspector I, Fire Officer I and Fire Investigator I certifications.
This course provides a study of fire protection alarm and extinguishing systems, including design characteristics, operational theory and functional limitations and capabilities. There will be comparative analysis of the various systems, including the standard governing systems. This course is required for the U.S. Fire Administration Higher Education (FESHE) degree. This course is required for the Fire Safety Inspector I, Fire Investigator I and Fire Officer II certifications.
This course examines the structure and function of fire prevention organizations, conducting inspections, procedures and techniques of fire prevention, recognition and elimination of fire hazards, fire risk analysis as applied to municipal and industrial occupancies, public relations programs, including coordination with other agencies, public education and inspections practices. This course is required for the U.S. Fire Administration Higher Education (FESHE) degree. This course is required for the Florida Fire Safety Inspector and Fire Officer II certifications.
This course introduces the basic concepts of occupational health and safety as they relate to emergency service organizations. Topics include risk evaluation and control procedures for fire stations, training sites, emergency vehicles and emergency situations involving fire, EMS, hazardous materials and technical rescue. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to establish and manage a safety program in an emergency service organization. This course is required for the U.S. Fire Administration Higher Education (FESHE) degree.
This course provides an overview of fire protection, career opportunities in fire protection and related fields, philosophy and history of fire protection/service, fire loss analysis, organization and function of public and private fire protection services, fire departments as part of local government, laws and regulations affecting the fire service, fire service nomenclature, specific fire protection functions, basic fire chemistry and physics, introduction to fire protection systems, introduction to fire strategy and tactics. This course is required for the U.S. Fire Administration Higher Education (FESHE) degree.
This course provides a foundation of theoretical knowledge in order to understand the principles of the use of water in fire protection and to apply hydraulic principles to analyze and to solve water supply problems. In addition, the curriculum covers pump theory, pump rating and pressure and vacuum gauges. Students will have to successfully complete FFP 1302 Apparatus Operations to be eligible to complete the State Pump Operator certification exam through the Florida State Fire College. This course must be completed with a grade of 70 percent "C" or higher to receive credit.
This course covers the laws, rules and driving techniques for emergency vehicles. There will be a practical portion of the course that includes fire ground evolutions using pre-connected lines, tandem pumping, drafting, relays and master streams. Students must bring gloves and proper attire for water pumping exercises. After successful completion of this course and FFP 1301, the student will be eligible to take the State Pump Operator certification exam through the Florida State Fire College. This course must be completed with a grade of 70 percent "C" to receive credit. Lab fee required.
This course examines the structure and function of fire prevention organizations, conducting inspections, procedures and techniques of fire prevention, recognition and elimination of fire hazards, fire risk analysis as applied to municipal and industrial occupancies, public relations programs, including coordination with other agencies, public education and inspections practices. This course is required for the U.S. Fire Administration Higher Education (FESHE) degree. This course is required for the Florida Fire Safety Inspector and Fire Officer II certifications.
This course covers a thorough study of codes applicable to fire protection and prevention, their application in various types of building construction and design with emphasis on fire protection features. This course is required for the Fire Safety Inspector certification.
This course provides a study of fire protection alarm and extinguishing systems, including design characteristics, operational theory and functional limitations and capabilities. There will be comparative analysis of the various systems, including the standard governing systems. This course is required for the U.S. Fire Administration Higher Education (FESHE) degree. This course is required for the Fire Safety Inspector I, Fire Investigator I and Fire Officer II certifications.
This course explores the theories and fundamentals of how and why fires start, spread and how they are controlled. This course is required for the U.S. Fire Administration Higher Education (FESHE) degree.
This course provides an overview of fire protection, career opportunities in fire protection and related fields, philosophy and history of fire protection/service, fire loss analysis, organization and function of public and private fire protection services, fire departments as part of local government, laws and regulations affecting the fire service, fire service nomenclature, specific fire protection functions, basic fire chemistry and physics, introduction to fire protection systems, introduction to fire strategy and tactics. This course is required for the U.S. Fire Administration Higher Education (FESHE) degree.
This course studies the planning, development, implementation and evaluation of fire service training programs. Training objectives, facilities, equipment, multimedia, schedules and record systems are discussed within the program. Emphasis is on the development of adult learning principles, teaching effectiveness and the skills and abilities required of instructors in the fire service. This course is required for the Florida Fire Officer I and Fire Service Instructor I certifications.
This course is designed to provide the public educator with the knowledge and skills needed to perform as a fire and life safety educator as addressed in the National Fire Protection Act (NFPA) 1035. Topics include fire behavior, community assessment, injury prevention and juvenile fire setting. The student will also develop presentation skills and learn how to design public education programs. This course is an elective for both the Fire and Life Safety Educator and the Fire Safety Inspector II certification through the Florida State Fire College. This course must be completed with a grade of 70 percent "C" or higher to receive credit.
This course will examine effective management techniques required for coordination between state, local and private sector entities during large-scale disasters. This course introduces the concepts of the Incident Command System (ICS), the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and the National Responses Framework (NRF). This course will show how ICS, NIMS and the NRF provides a template for responsible agencies to work together to prevent or respond to threats and incidents regardless of cause, size or complexity. The student will have the opportunity to complete NIMS-compliant self-study courses via FEMA and the Emergency Management Institute.
This course presents the basic concepts of fire attack. It seeks to develop the thinking skills needed by a fire officer in evaluating fire ground situations and planning the necessary steps to insure efficient control of fire under an emergency situation. This course is recommended for the U.S. Fire Administration Higher Education (FESHE) degree. This course is required for the Florida Fire Officer I certification.
This course introduces the basic concepts of occupational health and safety as they relate to emergency service organizations. Topics include risk evaluation and control procedures for fire stations, training sites, emergency vehicles and emergency situations involving fire, EMS, hazardous materials and technical rescue. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to establish and manage a safety program in an emergency service organization. This course is required for the U.S. Fire Administration Higher Education (FESHE) degree.
This course is designed to show the arson investigator the different forms of matter and energy, common substances and how they relate to fires. The curriculum will discuss chemical formulas of flammable and combustible substances and their bonding and separations. Other course material includes the different chemical reactions related to fire and oxidation. Particular emphasis will be placed on the specific substances used by arsonists to ignite and accelerate burnings. This course is recommended for the U.S. Fire Administration Higher Education (FESHE) degree. This course is required for the Fire Investigator I and Fire Safety Inspector II certifications.
This course presents the fundamental concepts of building construction as they relate to how buildings burn. Students will learn how the ravages of fire affect wood, steel, concrete and composite construction. Emphasis is on avoiding human injury in each type of construction. This course is required for the U.S. Fire Administration Higher Education (FESHE) degree. This course is required for the Fire Safety Inspector I, Fire Officer I and Fire Investigator I certifications.
This course covers the interpretation and application of Fire Protection Code requirements to construction plans, blueprints and the basic surveying mapping techniques of fire protection engineering. This course is required for the Fire Safety Inspector certification.
This course provides a study of fire protection alarm and extinguishing systems, including design characteristics, operational theory and functional limitations and capabilities. There will be a comparative analysis of the various systems, including the standards governing systems. This course is required for the Fire Safety Inspector II certification.
This course is designed to enhance the fire investigator's ability to detect and determine the origin and cause of a fire. Specific topics include fire behavior review, investigator ethics, building construction, ignition sources, reading fire patterns and scene re-construction. Special topics include electrical fire investigation, woodland fires, vehicle fires, mobile home fires, RV, boat and ship fires. This course is recommended for the U.S. Fire Administration Higher Education (FESHE) degree. This course is required for the Fire Investigator I and Fire Safety Inspector II certifications.
This course prepares the student to serve effectively as an organizational spokesperson according to the current practices in the profession of public relations and includes numerous examples from the fire service. Particular emphasis will focus on case studies in crisis communications and the role of the Public Information Officer in Incident Command. This course is an elective for the Fire Safety Inspector II certification.
This course prepares the student for the responsibilities of an officer at the fire company level. This course will assist fire officers in solving the varied problems and situations required to manage effectively in today's fire service. Students will learn about the day-to-day routine of operations of a fire company, management theory, communication, motivation, station and vehicle maintenance, shift staffing and grievance procedures. This course is required for the Florida Fire Officer I certification.
This course studies the planning, development, implementation and evaluation of fire service training programs. Emphasis is on course and program design. The focus will be on the development of training objectives, multimedia presentations and evaluation of learning which will be discussed within the program. This course is required for the Florida Instructor II and Fire Officer II certifications.
This course deals with the entire spectrum of issues facing fire service leaders. The course will address labor relations, human rights and diversity, conflict of interest and frameworks for ethical decision-making. This course is recommended for the U.S. Fire Administration Higher Education (FESHE) degree. This course is required for the Florida Fire Officer III certification.
This course is designed to be a progressive primer for students who want more knowledge about fire and emergency services administration. The course demonstrates the importance of the following skills necessary to manage and lead a fire and emergency services department through the following challenges and changes of the 21st century: persuasion and influence, accountable budgeting, anticipation of challenges, the need for change and using specific management tools for analyzing and solving problems. A central part of the course focuses on how the leadership of a fire and emergency services department develops internal and external cooperation to create a coordinated approach to achieving the department's mission. This course is recommended for the U.S. Fire Administration Higher Education (FESHE) degree.
This course covers multiple company operations, logistics, strategy, the use of mutual aid forces and conflagration control. This course is intended for fire officers who may be in command of fires and other emergencies requiring close coordination and maximum use of large amounts of personnel and equipment. Typical tactical situations and scenarios are discussed and practiced. Risk management, planning and critical thinking skills are stressed. This course is required for the Florida Fire Officer II certification.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty member is required. Students may earn internship credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program. Prerequisites: A minimum of 12 college credits (excluding prep courses) completed at Seminole State College which includes course(s) specifically aligned with the student’s chosen major as identified in the student’s program plan, a Seminole State College cumulative GPA of at least 2.5, appropriate job/internship placement and permission from the Career Development Center.
This capstone course is the conclusion of the student's fire science technology academic experience. It is the final course completed by students in the Fire Science Technology Associate in Science degree program. The major focus of this course is to integrate the material acquired in the previous courses and apply knowledge to solve problems or issues relating to the fire service or public safety agencies. Departmental consent is required for this final course in the program.
This is a course in the process of expository writing. Students will read essays and compose papers that are unified, organized, logically developed and supported, clearly stated and well-focused. Research techniques are introduced and incorporated into at least one composition. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Students must pass the core assignments with a grade of "C" or higher. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Communications requirement for degree seeking students.
In this course, students develop the ability to read literary texts critically, to think logically and creatively and to write and research effectively. Students must pass the core assignments with a grade of "C" or higher. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
The purpose of this course is to improve the basic skills of speaking and listening. Class exercises emphasize preparing and delivering public speeches, speaking with clarity and variety and listening with literal and critical comprehension. The course addresses communication in the personal, career and global spheres.

Three credits from Area A and three credits from Area B

This humanities course is designed to introduce students to the critical study of human culture and its varied expressions across time. Students will employ interdisciplinary methods of analysis through engagement with diverse cultural artifacts in order to develop a foundational understanding of the human experience and its connection to culture. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for degree seeking students.
This humanities course is designed to introduce students to the critical study of human culture and its varied expressions across time. Students will employ interdisciplinary methods of analysis through engagement with diverse cultural artifacts in order to develop a foundational understanding of the human experience and its connection to culture. This course partially satisfies the writing requirements of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities for degree seeking students.
The design of this course creates a diverse learning community for students in the Liberal Studies program. The course is a multi-cultural and inter-disciplinary study of the arts, performing arts, literature, history and philosophy with special focus on race, gender and class. Honors level material. The course satisfies three credits of General Education requirements in Humanities and partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B. E. 6A-10.030.
A course designed to promote the understanding and appreciation of humankind's cultural heritage in the prehistoric, Egyptian, Mesopotamian, Judaic, Greek and Roman periods. Representative works in art, music, literature and philosophy will be studied. Global culturalism will be incorporated into the course content. The student will be introduced to Internet resources as they pertain to appropriate thematic materials. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to promote the understanding and appreciation of humankind's cultural heritage in the Early Christian and Medieval periods. Representative works in art, music, literature and philosophy will be studied. Global culturalism will be incorporated into the course content. The student will be introduced to Internet resources as they pertain to appropriate thematic materials. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to promote the understanding and appreciation of the creative process and world culture. Representative works in art, literature, music and philosophy will be studied from the Renaissance and Baroque periods. Global culturalism will be incorporated into the course content. The student will be introduced to Internet resources as they pertain to appropriate thematic materials. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to promote the understanding and appreciation of the creative process and world culture. Representative works in art, literature, music and philosophy will be studied from the Enlightenment and Romantic periods. Global culturalism will be incorporated into the course content. The student will be introduced to Internet resources as they pertain to appropriate thematic materials. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to study representative works of the 20th and early 21st centuries in the performing arts, visual arts, music, literature, film and philosophy so that the student will appreciate the foundations of the 20th century and allow projections into the future. Global culturalism will be incorporated into the course content. The student will be introduced to Internet resources as they pertain to appropriate thematic materials. This course will also show how technology interacts with culture in the contemporary world. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to study representative works of the 20th and early 21st centuries in the performing arts, visual arts, music, literature, film and philosophy so that the student will appreciate the foundations of the 20th century and allow projections into the future. Global culturalism will be incorporated into the course content. The student will be introduced to Internet resources as they pertain to appropriate thematic materials. This course will also show how technology interacts with culture in the contemporary world. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to introduce the student to the contributions of women in the humanities. It will examine their contributions to literature, art and music from the Classical period to the present day. Students will learn how gender has influenced production of the arts throughout these periods. Examining notions of masculinity and femininity will be a key component of the course and their various representations in art, literature and music will be a major subject of study. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to introduce the student to the contributions of women in the humanities. It will examine their contributions to literature, art and music from the Classical period to the present day. Students will learn how gender has influenced production of the arts throughout these periods. Examining notions of masculinity and femininity will be a key component of the course and their various representations in art, literature and music will be a major subject of study. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to introduce the student to the Indian and Southeast Asian cultures. Emphasis will be placed on the basic myths underlying culture, their manifestation in the arts and their diffusion throughout South and Southeast Asia. Representative works in literature, mythology, philosophy and the visual arts will be studied. The student will be introduced to Internet resources as they pertain to appropriate thematic materials. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
Honors Asian Humanities is designed to introduce the student to the cultures of India, Tibet and Southeast Asia. The basic myths underlying culture will be studied as well as their manifestation in the arts. The course will explore the development of Indian thought with special emphasis on early Buddhism and the development of Mahayana Buddhist schools. Representative works in literature, mythology, philosophy and the visual arts will be studied. Archeological rites in Cambodia, Burma and Thailand will be studied as examples of myth in architecture. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to explore African American cultures and artistic manifestations and to promote increased awareness, understanding, degrees of tolerance and aesthetic appreciation of African American heritage. Pre-European African influences to modern cultural values of African American societies will be examined. Contemplative objects representing both visual and performing arts will be studied in their historical context. The student will be introduced to Internet resources as they pertain to appropriate thematic materials. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to explore African American cultures and artistic manifestations and to promote increased awareness, understanding, degrees of tolerance and aesthetic appreciation of African American heritage. Pre-European African influences to modern cultural values of African American societies will be examined. Contemplative objects representing both visual and performing arts will be studied in their historical context. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to introduce the student to Latin American cultures and to promote the understanding and appreciation of its cultural heritage. Ancient to modern cultures will be surveyed. Emphasis will be placed on cultural roots and myth as well as artists' commitment to social and political struggle. Representative works in the visual arts, literature and music will be studied. No knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese is required. The student will be introduced to Internet resources as they pertain to appropriate thematic materials. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to introduce the student to Latin American cultures and to promote the understanding and appreciation of Latin American heritage. Ancient to modern cultures will be surveyed. Emphasis will be placed on cultural roots and myth as well as artists' commitment to social and political struggle. Representative works in the visual arts, literature and music will be studied. No knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese is required. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to introduce students to the cultural contributions of members of the LGBTQ community and to promote a better understanding, awareness and appreciation for this culture's unique traditions. Emphasis will be placed on the origins of the culture and on the historical context of the production and use of artistic creation. Expressive cultural artifacts will be the primary focus of study. These include visual and performance art as well as works of literature. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
Discussions of the moral problems of contemporary society such as abortion, the sexual revolution, war, violence, aging, civil disobedience, modern medical practices and other issues take place in this course. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course covers fundamental philosophical questions of the human condition including: discussions of existence, identity, ethics, culture, free will, personhood, politics, distributive justice, and much more. Students engage in deep critical thought, analysis of philosophical perspectives including their own, and ultimately gain perspective on how philosophy manifests itself in every aspect of our lived experience. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement.
This course covers fundamental philosophical questions of the human condition including: discussions of existence, identity, ethics, culture, free will, personhood, politics, distributive justice, and much more. Students engage in deep critical thought, analysis of philosophical perspectives including their own, and ultimately gain perspective on how philosophy manifests itself in every aspect of our lived experience. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement.
This course is an ideological study of the major religions of the world emphasizing the relationships of their major tenets to our modern society. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
American Literature I is a survey of the historical and cultural development of American belles-lettres from 1630 to the late nineteenth century with attention to the influence of prevalent ideas and expressions of the age. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is a survey of the historical and cultural development of American literature from the late nineteenth through the twentieth century. It focuses on the fiction, poetry and drama that precede and constitute the Modern Era. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course will provide a brief, but comprehensive study of the writing styles of selected African American writers. This study will include a historical perspective of the racial climate in American society, the connection between literature by African Americans and will examine current criticism on selected texts. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course introduces students to art from a variety of cultures and historical contexts. Topics include major art movements, varieties of materials and aesthetic theories. Coursework covers formal terms, elements and principles common to the study of art and architecture. The course stresses the relationship of design principles to various art forms including, but not limited to, sculpture, painting and architecture. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and analyze a variety of artistic styles, periods and media and students will have an increased vocabulary of art terminology. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for degree seeking students.
This course is an integrated study of the main developments of the visual art forms (architecture, sculpture and painting) from Paleolithic man to the Early Renaissance. World art will be integrated into the content. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is an integrated study of the main developments of the visual art forms (architecture, sculpture and painting) from the 16th century to the present. World art will be integrated into the content. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to help students become more active, critical viewers of films and to be able to communicate that understanding in writing. Like written forms of literature, movies are texts that can be analyzed and interpreted. Students will view a number of films from different time periods, genres and artistic approaches. Lectures will concentrate on the narrative and stylistic elements used by film makers. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030 and the Humanities Area B General Education requirement.
This is a survey course designed to introduce students to the cinematic arts of a particular national cinema and to encourage them to think globally. Emphasis will be given to internationally recognized filmmakers of foreign cinemas and their recent new directors. Students will watch and analyze numerous films. They will study the aesthetics of film language as well as the social and cultural conditions that produce the cinema. The course will encourage student understanding of the intellectual, spiritual and moral issues that unite people despite differences in time, place, language and culture. Specific film content may vary from term to term. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030 and the Humanities Area B General Education requirement.
This course is a survey of the development of British literature from Anglo-Saxon times through the eighteenth century with attention to the historical background, the continuity of essential traditions and the characteristic temper of successive periods. Major emphasis is on the Old English, Middle English and Renaissance periods. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
British Literature II emphasizes the relevance of Romanticism, Victorianism and the first half of the twentieth century to contemporary thought. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to further student understanding of the concepts and applications of analytical and theoretical approaches to literature. Students will employ critical thinking in their interrogation of the texts. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for degree seeking students.
This course will explore trends and influences in literature from World War II to the present. Contemporary literature will be examined as a reflection of the philosophy of modern life and as a reflection of the student's world. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course will explore trends and influences in literature from World War II to the present. Contemporary literature will be examined as a reflection of the philosophy of modern life and as a reflection of the student's world. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to create an awareness of the ideas, techniques and historical relationships in world literature from the Enlightenment to the present. The Enlightenment, Romanticism, the 19th Century (Realism and Naturalism) and Modernism will be studied. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to create an awareness of the ideas, techniques and historical relationships in world literature from the Enlightenment to the present. The Enlightenment, Romanticism, the 19th Century (Realism and Naturalism) and Modernism will be studied. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course traces the historical origins, characteristics and stylistic developments of rock music from a musical and sociological perspective. This course is not recommended for music majors. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to introduce the student to primary forms and genres of blues and jazz music in both their historical and cultural context. Blues and jazz will be explored methodically as a distinctly American contribution to world music. The course will feature lecture and performance presentations by some of Florida's better known musicians and commentators. Literary and visual images of blues and jazz idioms will be incorporated into the course content. Assigned readings with active listening are an integral part of the course. The student will be introduced to Internet resources on the subject of blues and jazz themes. Students will be required to compose a journal with reactionary criticisms of blues and jazz guests and must complete a project that presents biographical and musical materials about a selected blues or jazz musician. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This course fulfills the Area B Humanities requirement.
Open to all students, this course is designed for the musical layman and is a survey course devoted to music in world civilization. Included is a study of the music relating to the background of the life and other arts of the times. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for degree seeking students.
This course is designed for the musical layman and is a survey course devoted to music in world civilization. Included is a study of the music relating to the background of the life and other arts of the times. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for degree-seeking students. Honors level content. Permission from Honors Director required.
This course is an introduction to music literature, history and culture for music majors. Topics to be addressed include an overview of musical repertories and cultures from the western art music tradition, American jazz and a selected case study of non-western music from a variety of musical traditions and historical periods, including from the western middle ages and north India. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course will explore the dramatic form and structure of a play. Students will read and analyze the script in order to study the playwright's intentions, methods and meanings. The script will be examined as a blueprint for production and performance. This course partially fulfills the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course surveys the art of theatre. Students will learn about the process of creating theatre through study of the production process and the many artists who participate in the creation of theatre. Through videos and attendance at live theatre, students will also learn the various forms of theatre, such as tragedy and comedy and various modes of presentation, both presentational and representational. Students will also be introduced to theatre's historic roots and its diversity as expressed in various cultures throughout the globe. This course contains a reading and writing component. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B. E. 6A-10.030. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for degree seeking students.
This course investigates the foundational African American presence in U.S. theatre. Through dramatic literature and theories of racial construction, the course will explore the historical, cultural and socio-political underpinnings of this theatre as an artistic form in American culture.
Courses must be taken from three areas. Three credits must be taken from History
This course covers the study of man. It is an introductory course covering the economic, cultural, social and political development and technology of primitive societies. Attitudes, approach to problems and the general way of life of primitive societies are compared with modern societies. The course also provides a brief introduction to the development of fossil man and archaeology. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course will explore the nature, characteristics and content of culture from an anthropological perspective by examining the economy, art, religion, politics, language and kinship patterns of individual human societies. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Credit for this course is also awarded to entering students with appropriate scores on the International Baccalaureate (IB) examination in Social Anthropology.
The nature of economics, production, distribution and price determination will be explored. Emphasis will be placed on practical application and policy determination. Current problems will be surveyed. The course is designed for non-business majors. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This is an introductory course covering the nature, scope and methods of economics, economic concepts and economic institutions. Emphasis is placed upon production, consumption, determination of prices, distribution of income, fiscal policy, national income determinants, money and banking and comparative economic systems. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for AA degree seeking students.
This is an introductory course covering the nature, scope and method of economics, economic concepts and institutions. Emphasis is placed upon production, consumption, determination of prices, distribution of income, fiscal policy, national income determinants, money and banking and comparative economic systems. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for AA degree seeking students.
This course deals primarily with economic problems. Emphasis is given to markets, production functions, economic role of government, agricultural problems, labor-management relations, imperfect competition, interest and capital, economic security, international trade and finance and economic development. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course deals primarily with economic problems. Emphasis is given to markets, production functions, economic role of government, agricultural problems, labor-management relations, imperfect competition, interest and capital, economic security, international trade and finance and economic development. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
In this course, topics of current interest are presented in group instruction. This course may be taken four times for credit. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is an introductory study of the human and natural resources of the major regions of the world. From each region, one or more countries are selected for study in depth. Political, cultural, economic and strategic comparisons are made. The current role of the United States in the areas studied receives particular attention. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is a systematic study of the physical elements of the Earth, including their interrelationships and importance to man and his activities. Basic explanations of physical features of the Earth, their form and origin, principles of weather, world climactic patterns, world vegetation patterns and the study of soil properties and classification into the great soil groups of the world are covered. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course examines the political dimensions of Islam within a regional and global context. The course will analyze the foundation of Islamic thought in society, the nature of the relationship between religious and political establishments, the roots of instability and conflict in the Middle East, and the problems generated by the conceptualization of the West vs. the "rest."
This course is an introduction to major issues and theories of world politics. Topics include state and non-state actors, the nature of power, causes of war and peace, terrorism, international organizations, finance and trade, economic development, globalization, human rights and environmental concerns. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is an introduction to major issues and theories of world politics. Topics include state and non-state actors, the nature of power, causes of war and peace, terrorism, international organizations, finance and trade, economic development, globalization, human rights and environmental concerns. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course will explore the dynamics from a variety of frames. The course will provide a cursory overview of various issues such as conflict, violence, war, non-violence and peace. The course is intended to engage students in the theory and application addressing conflict, violence, war and terrorism. Students will examine approaches to peace, alternatives to war and to peace-building through peace studies and non-violence movements. The course will adopt the frame that we must review actions of the past in order to prevent recurrences. The student will draw upon the ideology of individuals identified as great peacemakers. While exploring great peacemakers, a focus on personal non-violence, ethical approaches to war, conflict transformation or peace and movements for social change will be conducted. Students will investigate local and international conflict, social movements and non-violent approaches to peace. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
In this course basic aspects of the federal government are studied. Emphasis is placed upon content and interpretation of the Constitution, Federalism, the Congress, the Presidency, the federal court system and the citizen's connection to the federal government by means of elections, political parties, interest groups and public opinion. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for A.A. degree seeking students and the Florida state civic literacy requirement per Florida Statues Section 1007.25 for all students.
In this course, basic aspects of the federal government are studied. Emphasis is placed upon content and interpretation of the Constitution, Federalism, the Congress, the Presidency, the federal court system and the citizen's connection to the federal government by means of elections, political parties, interest groups and public opinion. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for A.A. degree seeking students and the Florida state civic literacy requirement per Florida Statues Section 1007.25 for all students.
In this course, functions of state, county and city governments are studied. Emphasis is placed upon constitutions, political parties, politics, legislatures, courts, chief executives and interrelationships between federal and state governments and metropolitan problems. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
The basic principles of political thought are studied in this course. Students will examine the state and the relationship between the individual and the state. Topics such as authority, consent, obligation, freedom, order, equality, justice and democracy.
The basic principles of political thought are studied in this course. Students will examine the state and the relationship between the individual and the state. Topics such as authority, consent, freedom and obligation are examined. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course includes a comparative survey of the social, political, economic and historical tenets and developments of contemporary political ideologies. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course will expose the student to various policies and environmental regulations concerning air quality and dependence on foreign energy sources. Discussion will include enactment of policies, laws, regulations and programs with regard to conventional and alternative energy sources. Assessment of concerns over future depletion of global oil supplies and the impact to the U.S. economy will be discussed. The federal, state or local governmental response to issues concerning pollution and its impact on the number of environmental laws, the effectiveness of any proposed initiative and the extent of implementation and enforcement will be explored.
This is an introduction to the basic principles of associative learning. The primary focus of the course is on how organisms learn about their relationships that occur in the environment. This will be achieved through studying the phenomena of classical and operant conditioning in animals and humans. Specific techniques for understanding behavior are presented. Honors level content. Permission required from the Honors Director.
This course will examine the clinical description and etiology of psychological disorders from an integrative perspective. Emphasis will be placed on theories of causation and current research on treatment modalities. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course explores the effects of genetic, psychological, maturational and social factors at various stages during the lifespan. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Some sections of DEP 2004 have service-learning components. Please refer to class notes in schedule of classes for details.
This course applies psychological principles to individual and group functioning in organizational settings. Major topics include employee selection, motivation, job satisfaction, leadership and performance evaluation. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course explores the major theoretical perspectives to personality theory, including psychodynamic, trait, biological, humanistic, behavioral and cognitive systems. The course will also evaluate practical applications for the areas of counseling, business, education, vocational skills and personal growth. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This is an introductory course which surveys the scientific study of behavior and mental processes known as psychology. This course will focus on the major categories identified by the American Psychological Association which are: Biological, Cognitive, Development, Social and Personality, and Mental and Physical Health. These categories will encompass topics such as learning, motivation, emotions, personality, abnormal behavior, treatment and therapy options, and an introduction to research methods. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Some sections of PSY 2012 have service-learning components. Please refer to class notes in schedule of classes for details. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for degree seeking students.
This is an introductory psychology course with an Honors designation. It intends to survey the scientific study of behavior and mental processes known as psychology. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course will focus on the major categories identified by the American Psychological Association which are: Biological, Cognitive, Development, Social and Personality, and Mental and Physical Health. These categories will encompass topics such as learning, motivation, emotions, personality, abnormal behavior, treatment and therapy options, and an introduction to research methods. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Some sections may have service-learning components. Please refer to class notes in schedule of classes for details. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for degree seeking students.
This course will examine influential experiments conducted in psychology over the last 100 years. These landmark studies have influenced and, at times, changed psychological principles and ethical standards. Major studies are in the areas of biopsychology, learning, memory, development, emotion, motivation, personality, psychopathology, therapies and social psychology. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is an introductory survey of sociology covering its scope, methods and general principles. Topics emphasized include group behavior, race relations, population, social institutions, social change and social stratification. The purpose of the course is to assist the student in acquiring an understanding of society. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course is an introductory survey of sociology covering its scope, methods and general principles. Topics emphasized include group behavior, race relations, population, social institutions, social change and social stratification. The purpose of the course is to assist the student in acquiring an understanding of society. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Note: This course contains Honors level material. Acceptance into the Honors Program or Permission from the Honors Director required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course is an in-depth analysis into the scope and causes of major problem areas from the perspective of both the individual and the community. Consideration will be given to various possible remedial approaches to each problem area. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is applied sociology that will pursue a unique, original research project each semester. It provides students with an in-depth understanding of social scientific research through experimental investigation. Utilizing the research project as a point of focus, this course includes training in all aspects of empirical research, including literature review, methodology, data collection, data coding, data analysis and presentation of results. Previous coursework in sociology or psychology is recommended. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director.
This course is designed to study the changing culture of our nation. Issues of race, ethnicity, gender, class, nationality and globalism will be explored. This course is also designed to provide information and strategies for living and working in a pluralistic, multi-cultural society. Values and ethics of diversity and commonality will be emphasized. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course will explore the dynamics of conflict from a variety of frames. Students will be provided with valuable insight about conflict that will help lead to an understanding regarding the conflicts they are likely to face in life, at school or work, in society as well as those they observe in national headlines. An introduction to the dispute resolution practices of mediation, facilitation and negotiation will be conducted. The examination of how one's gender and cultural perspective may influence the approach and outcome of the conflict will be discussed. Current trends and issues within the field of conflict management and resolution will be reviewed. The course will engage students in the theory and application of addressing conflict management and resolution on an individual, interpersonal and international perspective. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to present students with an interdisciplinary study of the sexual functioning of humans. Course information is drawn liberally from the disciplines of sociology, psychology and biology, providing students with an integrated introduction to the study of human sexual behavior. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is a historical and comparative study of courtship, mate selection, engagement, marriage, husband-wife relationships and child-rearing in the United States. Emphasis is placed upon the changing contemporary family with respect to social and economic status, sex, sources of marital conflict and social values. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course will examine normative deviance through the sociological lens. It will focus on the social context, behaviors and societal reactions associated with deviance. Criminal and noncriminal forms of deviance will be investigated using a variety of theoretical perspectives. In approaching deviance sociologically, this course will highlight the social constructions of deviance and the influence of social control and stigmatization as reactions to deviant behavior. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course begins with European arrival in the New World and moves on to colonial America, examining early America regionally. Pre-revolutionary America warrants special attention, including the French and Indian War leading to the Stamp Act and the activities of Boston's "Sons of Liberty." The Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution are examined in detail. Jeffersonian and Jacksonian democracy, westward expansion and the events and issues leading to the American Civil War conclude the course. The role of women and various ethnic groups in the development of America are considered throughout the course. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course begins with European arrival in the New World and moves on to Colonial America, examining early America regionally. Pre-revolutionary America warrants special attention, including the French and Indian War leading to the Stamp Act and the activities of Boston's "Sons of Liberty." The Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution are examined in detail. Jeffersonian and Jacksonian democracy, westward expansion and the events and issues leading to the American Civil War conclude the course. The role of women and various ethnic groups in the development of America are considered through the course. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course begins with the "Reconstruction" period and examines the problems of reunifying America. The nation's industrial period gets close attention, as does the rise of American cities and their accompanying social and political problems. U.S. Imperialism and the Spanish-American War are examined. The "Progressive" period, which includes emphasis on the American Labor Movement and the demand for women's rights are included. World War I and its aftermath in the "Roaring Twenties" are analyzed. The Great Depression and World War II are detailed. The conflicts of the late twentieth century, including the Cold War, Korea, Vietnam and the American Civil Rights Movement are examined. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for degree seeking students and satisfies the Florida State Civic Literacy requirement per Florida Statutes.
This course begins with the "Reconstruction" period and examines the problems of reunifying America. The nation's industrial period gets close attention, as does the rise of American cities and their accompanying social and political problems. U.S. Imperialism and the Spanish-American War are examined. The "Progressive" period, which includes emphasis on the American Labor Movement and the demand for women's rights are included. World War I and its aftermath in the "Roaring Twenties" are analyzed. The Great Depression and World War II are detailed. The conflicts of the late twentieth century, including the Cold War, Korea, Vietnam and the American Civil Rights movement are examined. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for degree seeking students and satisfies the Florida State Civic Literacy requirement per Florida Statutes.
This course examines the major political, social, economic, cultural, military and diplomatic development that shaped the development of the modern American nation since 1945, including World War II, the Cold War, the McCarthy Era, the complacent fifties, the turbulent sixties, the disillusioning seventies and the search for new directions since, to include the 1980's. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course presents the history of Florida from the pre-Columbian era to the present with a special focus on Central Florida. Topics include pre-contact, colonial and modern periods with emphasis on political developments, population growth and associated social, economic and environmental issues.
This course will cover the role of women in American history from the colonial period to the present. Emphasis will be placed upon the contributions of women to the development of colonial America and their role in pre-Revolutionary times. A separate section will analyze women during the War of Independence and the writing of the U.S. Constitution. Women during the early Republic on the eve of the Civil War and their role in the Reconstruction of America will likewise be discussed. Also addressed is the topic of women as leaders of the "Progressive" movement and during World War I and World War II. The "Women's Lib" movement of the 1960s and 1970s is examined and the role of women in America today concludes the course. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course will cover the role of women in American history from the colonial period to the present. Emphasis will be placed upon the contributions of women to the development of colonial America and their role in pre-Revolutionary times. A separate section will analyze women during the War of Independence and the writing of the U.S. Constitution. Women during the early Republic on the eve of the Civil War and their role in the Reconstruction of America will likewise be discussed. Also addressed is the topic of women as leaders of the "Progressive" movement and during World War I and World War II. The "Women's Lib" movement of the 1960s and 1970s is examined and the role of women in America today concludes the course. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course analyzes the tribal and national background of Africans before their forced migration to Latin and North America. It examines the so-called "Triangle Trade," Africans in colonial and revolutionary America and the lives of free Black Americans as well as those held in bondage. A close look at the Abolitionist Movement and the American Civil War is included. Prominent African Americans from Benjamin Banneker and Phyllis Wheatley to Martin Luther King and Maya Angelou will be studied. The political, social, economic and religious positions and circumstances of African Americans in the twentieth century will conclude the course. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course traces the rise of Western civilization from 1000 B.C.E. to the Renaissance, c. 1600. It emphasizes Greek civilization, including drama, mythology, philosophy and the origins of Greek democracy and then examines the late Roman Republic and early Roman Empire followed by the rise of Christianity, Islam, the Byzantine Empire, the "Flowering of Medieval Culture" and the Christian Synthesis of the late Middle Ages. The European Renaissance and the Reformation including social, political and philosophical issues will be discussed. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course traces the rise of Western civilization from 1000 B.C.E. to the Renaissance, c. 1600. It emphasizes Greek civilization, including drama, mythology, philosophy and the origins of Greek democracy and then examines the late Roman Republic and early Roman Empire followed by the rise of Christianity, Islam, the Byzantine Empire, the "Flowering of Medieval Culture" and the Christian Synthesis of the late Middle Ages. The European Renaissance and the Reformation including social, political and philosophical issues will be discussed. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course covers the period from c. 1600 to the present. Topics include the scientific revolution, the rise of absolute monarchy in Europe, the 18th-century Enlightenment and the French Revolution. The impact of Napoleon is addressed as is the Industrial Revolution and the advent of socialism, including Marxism. Cultural ideas from Romanticism to social Darwinism are analyzed. European imperialism, World War I and the rise of fascism lead to a discussion of World War II. The impact of western civilization on Asia, Africa and the Middle East are also considered. The Cold War and the modern period conclude the course. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course covers the period from c. 1600 to the present. Topics include the scientific revolution, the rise of absolute monarchy in Europe, the 18th-century Enlightenment and the French Revolution. The impact of Napoleon is addressed as is the Industrial Revolution and the advent of socialism, including Marxism. Cultural ideas from Romanticism to social Darwinism are analyzed. European imperialism, World War I and the rise of fascism lead to a discussion of World War II. The impact of western civilization on Asia, Africa and the Middle East are also considered. The Cold War and the modern period conclude the course. Permission required from Honors director. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course will use an interdisciplinary approach to create an introduction to both science and European history during the two related periods (such as Greek and Roman or Medieval and Renaissance). Students will examine major historical events, actors, ideas and cultural trends. They should also strengthen their skills in writing, reading and critical analysis. Each historical theme for study will correspond to a concept in science so that students will be able to approach architecture, military engineering and other elements of period life with modern scientific knowledge.
This course will cover the history of Latin America from 1492 to the present, emphasizing the multi-racial origins of Latin American countries, the development of political institutions, the relationship between Latin America and the U.S.A. and the response of modern Latin America to the challenges of democracy and economic development. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
Taking both a thematic and chronological approach, this course explores the ways in which peoples across the world have engaged, conflicted and cooperated with one another since 1500 CE. We will emphasize the ways in which individuals and groups have experienced and influenced larger historical trends, including exploration and colonization, the rise of capitalism and challenges to capital, decolonization and globalization. Throughout the semester, we will learn how historians create knowledge and practice historical thinking and skills.
This survey course traces the historical background and development of Christianity from the first century to the Medieval period. There is an emphasis on the Hebraic roots of Christianity, the political and social setting of Palestine during the time of Jesus of Nazareth and the problems involved in the so-called, "Quest for the Historical Jesus." The missionary work of St. Paul is closely examined, as is emerging Christian doctrine between 100 and 500 C.E. Philosophical and spiritual alternatives to Christianity are also analyzed, as is Christianity's relationship to the Roman and Byzantine Empires. Everyday life and forms of worship among Christians are studied, as is Christianity as a political institution. While matters of faith and doctrine are discussed, the course perspective is historical rather than religious. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.

Courses must be taken from two different areas

This course is intended to familiarize students with the basic biology of yeast and fungi that are of medical importance. A survey of common mycotic infections and mycotoxicosis is presented. It includes basic hands-on laboratory exercises involving the microscopic examination of samples and isolates, collecting samples for culturing yeast and fungi, preparation, inoculation and incubation of media, identification of yeast and fungal morphotypes (both microscopic and on culture media) using dichotomous or pictographic schemes, field studies and laboratory experimentations.
This course is a study of the characteristics of living organisms. Unifying concepts such as metabolism, genetics, evolution and cellular organization will be investigated. Designed for non-science majors, this course does not fulfill the credit requirements for biology majors (see BSC 2010C). This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course is a study of the characteristics of living organisms with emphasis on man. Unifying concepts such as metabolism, energy utilization and reproduction will be investigated. Laboratory exercises will emphasize basic principles of biology. Designed for non-science majors, this course does not fulfill the credit requirements for biology majors. Lab fee required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course is a study of the characteristics of living organisms. Unifying concepts such as metabolism, genetics, evolution and cellular organization will be investigated. Designed for non-science majors, this course does not fulfill the credit requirements for biology majors (see BSC 2010C). Honors level content. Permission from Honors Director required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science Requirement for A.A. degree-seeking students.
This course provides an introduction to scientific inquiry in relationship to the human body, its systems and basic functions with emphasis on homeostatic mechanisms. The structure and function of cells, tissues and organ systems will be investigated. Designed for non-science majors. This course does not fulfill the credit requirements for Biology majors.
This course is a study of interactions between living things and their biotic and abiotic environments with emphasis on the influence of humankind on natural systems and built environments. Designed for non-science majors, this course does not fulfill the credit requirements for biology majors.
This course is a study of plant and animal interactions in their natural environment and the influence of man on these natural systems. Active learning components may include outdoor activities and/or field trips. Designed for non-majors. Honors level content. Permission of the Honors director is required.
This course is a primer to prepare students to succeed in a biology or anatomy and physiology courses. The course focuses on developing and improving study skills and emphasizes personal accountability. Course content includes a review of basic math, biology, chemistry and cells and introduces anatomical terminology and body basics. This course cannot be used as a substitute for BSC 2010C.
Anatomy and Physiology I - Transfer
Students will be introduced to the most common lifestyle on earth: parasitism! This course will be a broad survey of parasites of humans, domestic and wild animals. Major topics will include ecological and evolutionary aspects of parasite-host interactions with an emphasis on life cycles, anatomy and physiology of parasites and immunological, pathological and clinical responses of hosts to parasitic infection. The treatment and control of parasites will also be discussed.
This course is primarily for science majors or students with a strong biology background. It is a study of the molecular and cellular composition and function of living organisms. Emphasis will be given to structure, chemical metabolism and genetic mechanisms. Laboratory illustrates basic biological principles. Lab fee required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course is a survey of the elementary aspects of the astronomical universe. Topics include the history and growth of astronomy, instrumentation, solar system, stars, galaxies and cosmology. Star-gazing sessions and planetarium trips are included to identify the prominent constellations and stars. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This course is a survey of the elementary aspects of the astronomical universe. Topics include the history and growth of astronomy, instrumentation, solar system, stars, galaxies and cosmology. Star-gazing sessions and planetarium trips are included to identify the prominent constellations and stars. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This course will introduce students to the Earth as a complex and dynamic system. Focus will be on the solid Earth, the oceans, the atmosphere and interactions among these subsystems. Students will learn of the Earth's origin and place within the solar system. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree-seeking students.
This is a three-credit-hour General Education course with no prerequisites. Students will study the impact of human systems on the physical and biological environment as well as discuss possible solutions to today's environmental problems. Topics include ecology, natural resources, energy, pollution, population growth, urbanization and sustainability. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This is a four-credit-hour General Education course with no prerequisites. Students will study the impact of human systems on the physical and biological environment as well as discuss possible solutions to today's environmental problems. Topics include ecology, natural resources, energy, pollution, population growth, urbanization and sustainability. The laboratory will give students an analytical learning experience in environmental science, as well as teach them to apply the learned concepts to real world problems and issues. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This is a three-credit hour General Education course. Students will study the impact of human systems on the physical and biological environment as well as discuss possible solutions to today's environmental problems. Topics include ecology, natural resources, energy, pollution, population growth, urbanization and sustainability. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This beginning course is designed to give the student a basic understanding of Earth. Emphasis is on Earth materials, geologic hazards, the water cycle and plate tectonics. This course satisfies a natural science requirement and provides background knowledge for further courses in Earth sciences.
This course provides an introduction to the fossil record of life on Earth. Focus will be on modes of preservation, identification of fossil material, evolution and the fossil record of invertebrate and vertebrate animals. A field trip may be required.
This course provides a survey of introductory ideas in physical geology, including Earth materials, geologic hazards, plate tectonics, the water cycle and surficial landforms. Laboratory work will consist of identification of minerals and rock specimens, interpretation of stratigraphic units and work with topographic, physiographic and geologic maps and imagery. Field trips may be required. Lab fee required.
This beginning course is designed to acquaint the student with the elementary physical, chemical, biological and geological characteristics of the world ocean system. Emphasis is on Florida and its unique relationship with the ocean environment.
This beginning course is designed to acquaint the student with the oceans, Earth's most dominant feature and their importance to all planetary systems. Focus will be on their physical, chemical, biological and geological characteristics. Emphasis is on Florida and its unique relationship with the ocean environment. Field trips may be included.
This honors level introductory course is designed to acquaint students with the oceans, Earth's most dominant feature and their importance to all planetary systems. Focus will be on their physical, chemical, biological and geological characteristics. Emphasis is on Florida and its unique relationship with the ocean environment. Field trips may be included. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director.
This beginning course is designed to acquaint students with the elementary characteristics of the atmosphere. Students with an interest in aviation would especially benefit from many units taught in the course. Units include a study of atmospheric structure, heat budget, winds, air pollution, local and regional weather forecasting and more. Weather products are downloaded from the Internet and used throughout the course. Optional field trips included.
This beginning course is designed to acquaint students with the elementary characteristics of the atmosphere. Students with an interest in aviation would especially benefit from many units taught in the course. Units include a study of atmospheric structure, heat budget, winds, air pollution, local and regional weather forecasting and more. Weather products are downloaded from the Internet and used throughout the course. Laboratory work will focus on the extracting of information from online weather resources and the use of other weather-related tools. Optional field trips included. Lab fee required.
This is a one-semester course for the non-science major designed to meet the General Education requirement. Presumes no chemistry or mathematics background. Basic chemical principles are covered and related to larger topics that may include the chemistry of water and the atmosphere, energy sources, natural and man-made materials and environmental issues. Laboratory exercises during the lecture may be used to complement course material. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This is a one-semester course for the non-science major designed to meet the General Education requirement. Presumes no chemistry or mathematics background. Basic chemical principles are covered and related to larger topics that may include the chemistry of water and the atmosphere, energy sources, natural and man-made materials and environmental issues. Laboratory experiments are chosen that support these topics. Lab fee required. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This is a one-semester course for the non-science major designed to meet the General Education requirement. Presumes no chemistry or mathematics background. Basic chemical principles are covered and related to larger topics that may include the chemistry of water and the atmosphere, energy sources, natural and man-made materials and environmental issues. Laboratory exercises during the lecture may be used to complement course material. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This is a one-semester course designed to introduce the principles of chemistry to nursing and allied health students. It assumes no prior chemistry background. The course can also be used as a preparation for CHM 2045C. Topics will span general, organic and biological chemistry and cover problem-solving, atomic and molecular structure, chemical reactions, bonding, gas laws, radioactivity, an introduction to organic chemistry, carbohydrates, acids/bases and other selected topics. Lab fee required.
This course serves as the first semester of the two-semester general chemistry sequence. Topics covered include problem-solving, atomic and molecular structure, chemical formulas and nomenclature, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, bonding models, gas laws, solutions and other selected topics. Laboratory experiments are chosen that support these topics. Lab fee required. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This course serves as the first semester of the two-semester general chemistry sequence. Topics covered include problem-solving, atomic and molecular structure, chemical formulas and nomenclature, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, bonding models, gas laws, solutions and other selected topics. Laboratory experiments are chosen that support these topics. Lab fee required. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This course introduces students to the quantitative and qualitative descriptions of the fundamental physical principles used in construction and architectural design. Topics include vectors, forces, static equilibrium of point particles and rigid bodies, torque, center of gravity and moment of inertia, stress-strain relationships, torsion and shear stress, as well as some basic electrical principles, such as Ohm's Law, power and resistor circuits. Applications to construction and design will be discussed. This course must be completed with a grade of "C" or higher.
This course is for non-science majors. Fundamental concepts of physics with application of everyday experiences are covered. Topics include kinematics, mechanics, electricity and magnetism and special topics. This course is designed to give the student a working knowledge of the physical factors in our environment. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This course contains a descriptive and quantitative study of kinematics, mechanics, energy and applications of mechanics. This course meets the requirements for professional and technical students needing an algebra-based physics course. Lab fee required. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This physics course is designed for science, engineering and mathematics majors. Topics studied are kinematics, mechanics and applications of mechanics. Lab fee required. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This honors physics course is designed for science, engineering and mathematics majors. Topics studied are kinematics, mechanics and applications of mechanics. Lab is included. Lab fee required. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This course is an overview of local, regional and global sustainability with the goal of helping students recognize and engage with the interplay between environmental, socio-cultural and economic forces that affect our ability to achieve sustainability. Topics will include the science of climate change, pollution, environmental ethics and politics, renewable energy and sustainability in the built environment.
This course is a study of the fundamental topics in advanced algebra with emphasis on applications, the understanding of the function concept and manipulative skills. Major topics include operations on algebraic expressions and complex numbers, solving polynomial equations and inequalities, absolute value equations and inequalities and rational equations and inequalities, applications, functions, exponents and logarithms, graphs of polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions and systems of equations and inequalities. The use of graphing calculators will be incorporated throughout the course. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for degree seeking students.
This is a course in precalculus algebra intended for the student who is planning to take trigonometry and the calculus sequence. Major topics include rational and other algebraic functions and their graphs, piecewise-defined functions, a review of exponential and logarithmic functions, conic sections, matrices and determinants, sequences and series, Mathematical Induction, the Binomial Theorem and applications. The use of graphing calculators will be incorporated throughout the course. This course may be taken concurrently with MAC 1114, Trigonometry.
This is a course in precalculus algebra and trigonometry intended for the student who is planning to take the calculus sequence. This course condenses into a five-credit hour format all topics of Precalculus Algebra (MAC 1140) and Trigonometry (MAC 1114). Algebra topics include the following: polynomial, rational and other algebraic functions and their graphs, piecewise-defined functions, a review of exponential and logarithmic functions, conic sections, matrices and determinants, sequences and series, Mathematical Induction, the Binomial Theorem and applications. Trigonometry topics include angular measure, right triangle and unit circle trigonometry, trigonometric (circular) and inverse trigonometric functions and their graphs, trigonometric identities, conditional trigonometric equations, solution of right and oblique triangles, vectors, complex numbers in trigonometric form, applications, polar coordinates and graphs and parametric equations and graphs. The use of graphing calculators will be incorporated throughout the course. Successful completion of a high school course containing trigonometric topics and/or concepts is recommended.
This course is a study of Differential and Integral Calculus of algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions with applications to business analysis. It is designed to provide the student of business and social sciences a course in applied calculus. This course is not intended for the student who is required to complete the calculus series.
This is a first course in analytic geometry and the theory and application of calculus. Selected topics include a review of functions, limits and continuity, the derivative, differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions and their inverses, the Mean Value and Intermediate Value Theorems, extrema and graph sketching, area and the definite integral, anti-differentiation and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and integration of transcendental functions and their inverses. A graphing calculator will be used throughout the course. Students should ask the instructor which calculator will be used. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for degree seeking students.
This is a first course in analytic geometry and the theory and application of calculus. Selected topics include a review of functions, limits and continuity, the derivative, differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions and their inverses, the Mean Value and Intermediate Value Theorems, extrema and graph sketching, area and the definite integral, anti-differentiation and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and integration of transcendental functions and their inverses. The graphing calculator will be used throughout the course. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for degree seeking students.
This course is a continuation of MAC 2311. Selected topics include conics, translation and rotation of axes, techniques of integration, arc length and other applications of the definite integral, polar coordinates, indeterminate forms and improper integrals, infinite sequences and series and Taylor's Formula. A graphing calculator will be used throughout the course. Students should ask the instructor which calculator will be used.
The following topics will be covered in this course: sets and Venn diagrams, logic, inductive and deductive reasoning, counting principles, permutations and combinations, probability, descriptive statistics and geometry. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for degree seeking students. It is recommended that students without college-level math credits have completed a secondary-level course in Geometry, Algebra 2, Precalculus, Calculus, or Math for College Liberal Arts with a grade of ‘B’ or higher before taking this course.
This course provides an opportunity for students to see mathematics used in ways not seen in traditional mathematics courses. Topics are selected from the following: financial mathematics, numbers and number systems, elementary number theory and graph theory. Additional topics may be included at the discretion of the instructor. History of mathematics, critical thinking skills, problem-solving techniques and the appropriate use of technology will be used throughout the course. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for degree seeking students. It is recommended that students without college-level math credits have completed a secondary-level course in Geometry, Algebra 2, Precalculus, Calculus, or Math for College Liberal Arts with a grade of ‘B’ or higher before taking this course.
This course introduces descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, two-sample inferences, correlation and regression and nonparametric tests. This course is a first course in statistical methods for those students entering a science or business-related field. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for degree seeking students. It is recommended that students without college-level math credits have completed a secondary-level course in Geometry, Algebra 2, Precalculus, Calculus, or Math for College Statistics with a grade of ‘B’ or higher before taking this course.
This Honors course introduces descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, two-sample inferences, correlation and regression and nonparametric tests. This course is a first course in statistical methods and involves Honors students in projects and development of portfolios. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for degree seeking students. It is recommended that students without college-level math credits have completed a secondary-level course in Geometry, Algebra 2, Precalculus, Calculus, or Math for College Statistics with a grade of ‘B’ or higher before taking this course.
Total Credits: 120

General Education Core Course. Denotes that a class is a State of Florida General Education Core Course.

Prior to the award of an associate in arts or baccalaureate degree, first-time-in-college students entering a Florida College System institution in the Fall 2015 term and thereafter must complete at least one (1) course from each of the general education subject areas listed in this section. Beginning in the 2022-23 academic year and thereafter, students entering associate in arts, associate in science or associate in applied science, or baccalaureate degree programs must complete at least one (1) course from each of the general education subject areas listed in this section prior to the awarding of their degree. Please refer to this catalog's Graduation Requirements section for specific requirements on the General Education Core Courses.

The State of Florida requires that all students graduating from Seminole State College of Florida and other institutions in the Florida College System (FCS), as well as from any State University System (SUS) institution, fulfill a Civic Literacy Competency requirement prior to submitting an Intent to Graduate form in the term they plan to graduate. Requirements vary based on admit term and program. Please refer to this catalog’s Graduation Requirements section for specific requirements on the Civic Literacy Proficiency Requirement.

Students enrolled in Seminole State College’s baccalaureate degree programs must demonstrate foreign language proficiency. Students who have previously received a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution are exempt from this requirement. Please refer to this catalog's Graduation Requirements section for specific requirements on Foreign Language Proficiency.

Your tuition shouldn’t go against your intuition.

Your pursuit of higher education is admirable. So why struggle with high tuition in the process? Here we make life’s next steps affordable. Whether you’re seeking a university transfer (A.A.) degree, a four-year bachelor’s, an Associate in Science degree or even earning a technical certificate, you’ll find reasonable tuition and payment options that make sense. And to us, that’s scholarly.

In fact, a full-time college education at Seminole State is more than $10,000 less each year than most state universities. 

Go For Less.

Tuition and Fee Comparison*

 Seminole State UFFSUUCF
Tuition and Fees$3,597$6,380$6,538 $6,379
Room and Board-0-$10,590 $11,088 $10,300
Books and Supplies$1,000$850$1,000$1,200
Total$4,597$17,860 $18,626 $17,879

For more information on Seminole State's tuition and fees, please see the 2020-21 fee schedule.

* Tuition costs are based on Fall 2020 and Spring 2021 terms, with 15 credit hours per term for in-state students. Dorm fees, meal plans and book expenses are estimates based on information provided on each university's website. Lab fees and other fees that may be assessed at the time of registration may be viewed in the College fee schedule. As Seminole State is a commuter college with no residence halls on its campuses, costs for room and board are not calculated.

Career Opportunities

Upon completion of the Public Safety Administration Bachelor of Science program, graduates may find employment in both the public and private sectors working in administration as: 

  • Correctional Treatment Specialist
  • Emergency Medical Services Administration Command Staff
  • Fire Department Administration Command Staff
  • Fire Inspector
  • Fire Marshal
  • First-Line Supervisor of Firefighting and Prevention Workers 
  • First-Line Supervisor of Police and Detectives
  • Forensic Science Technician
  • Paramedic
  • Police and Sheriff's Office Administration Command Staff
  • Probation Officer 
  • Security Director


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