Criminal Justice Technology Associate in Science

The Associate in Science in Criminal Justice Technology provides you with a strong background of necessary skills in the fast paced field of Criminal Justice. This program includes courses in the areas of law enforcement, legal affairs, corrections, and investigations. Covering criminal law, criminal procedures, crime scene investigation, and criminology, you will study valuable topics that will prepare you for a career in the public safety field.

Related Programs

Getting Started: Summer Full and
A Session

March 14:  Financial Aid


May 2:  Application


May 9:  Classes Begin

Other Important Dates »

Why Seminole State?

  • Affordable tuition: Earn a state university education at about half the cost.
  • Small class sizes: With classes of 30 or less, you don’t have to learn in an auditorium.
  • Online degree option: Most courses for our A.S. degrees are offered in person and online, so you can study when and where you want. 
  • Seamless transitionMost A.S. graduates earn credits that can be applied to a bachelor's degree at Seminole State or at the University of Central Florida through DirectConnect® to UCF.*
  • Job Placement: According to state data, most Seminole State A.S. programs have placement rates above 90 percent.

*A.S. students who are planning to transfer to bachelor's degree programs should meet with a counselor, advisor or specialist to make sure the required courses are taken and the entry requirements are met.

Additional Information

Criminal Justice Technology
Type: Associate in Science
Major Code: CRIM-AS
CIP: 1743010302

Program Description

Available Course Course Not Offered Fall 2022
This course consists of a survey of delinquent and criminal behavior patterns, including causation. Specific problems and selected case studies are examined.
This course consists of the history, examination and evaluation of the courts, the police and the correctional organizations of the criminal justice system in the United States today. Contemporary problems and possible solutions are also considered.
This course examines substance abuse in the United States with an emphasis on social, historical and criminal implications.
This capstone course is the conclusion of the student's criminal justice academic experience and is the summation of the Criminal Justice Associate in Science (A.S.) degree program. The major focus of this course is to integrate the material acquired in the previous courses and apply knowledge to solve problems or issues relating to the criminal justice system or criminal justice agencies.
This course is a study of corrections for students of criminal justice to enable them to understand the development and conduct of its complexity and scope historically, traditionally, operationally and legally.
This course is designed to develop an understanding of the law enforcement profession. It examines the various approaches of modern law enforcement as well as a historical overview of law enforcement. It provides a description of policing and examines law enforcement as a balance of social, historical, political, legal, individual and organizational forces.
The fundamental principles, concepts and theory of investigation, interviews, interrogations, surveillance and sources of information, case preparations, problems in criminal investigation and investigative techniques of specific crimes are explored in this course.
This course provides an understanding about balancing the power of government and the freedoms and privacy of citizens to allow the government enough power to serve and protect its citizens without unnecessarily invading individual rights.
This course identifies and defines principles and doctrines of law with emphasis on Florida criminal and civil statutes that provide sanctions for inappropriate behavior within our society.
This course will provide a basic understanding of the security role in society. This course will present a global view of security along with the practical application of security principles. Students will be exposed to physical security, personnel security and risk assessments as well as industrial security, institutional security and homeland security. Students will also be introduced to security management planning and administration.
This is a survey course introducing the student to the multidisciplinary nature of forensics. The scope of this course will include discovery at a crime scene, location of evidence, physical evidence, analytical techniques for organic and inorganic materials, forensic toxicology, firearms, ammunition, unique tool marks and various impressions.
This course is designed to provide a broad and rigorous academic investigation of homicide. The student will go beyond what they have learned about murder through popular media presentations. Students will be exposed to a scientific study of different types of homicide, theories of homicide and homicide law as well as details about how homicide cases are worked on by detectives and how murder cases are dealt with in the courts.
This course provides the basic philosophical principles necessary to analyze ethical dilemmas within the criminal justice world. This course also offers an approach that deals with real life examples of misconduct, the effects of misconduct, research on criminal justice ethics and the various policy issues in criminal justice. This course will also identify themes that run though the entire criminal justice system, for example, issues such as discretion and due process concerning practitioners in law enforcement, the courts and corrections. This course will also look at how the definition of justice is defined by criminal justice professionals who deal with these dilemmas on a daily basis.
This course will develop students to be effective managers by exposing them to concepts such as budget management, crafting program enhancements and proposals, project management, developing and maintaining agency policies, complying with federal and state labor laws and meeting expectations of accreditation bodies.
This course focuses on the fundamentals of criminal justice supervision such as motivation techniques, applying discipline appropriately, conducting effective and meaningful employee performance evaluations, operational planning and implementing staff schedules. The student will also be introduced to the concepts of effective leadership.
This course introduces the student to the basic skills needed for effective public speaking and an appreciation for an effective public message program. The student will learn how to handle crisis management and the media as well as how to utilize social networking resources to meet the demands of the communities they serve.
This course examines various types and topologies of deviant criminal acts and the underlying causes of behavior of the perpetrators who commit them. Specific offenders and their behaviors will be studied.
This course will provide a basic understanding of those individuals who engage in predator violence, including serial killers, mass murderers, serial rapists and stalkers. This course will discuss the ways law enforcement is dealing with these types of persons to detect, arrest and prosecute them. The course will also discuss ways in which male and female predators are similar and different. The course will also discuss which victims are selected and why a particular person becomes a victim.
This course is an examination of organized crime, including structures, persons involved and their role, history and activities and the issues surrounding efforts to define and control it.
This course provides a comprehensive overview of a wide range of sexual behaviors and sex crimes. This course will deal with crimes such as voyeurism and exhibitionism to rape, sex crimes against children and more. This course will study the unique and engaging case studies and first person accounts from the sex offenders. This course will study sex crimes, deviance and criminal behavior theory and analysis. The course will also deal with information on psychological profiling of sex offenders, the crimes they commit, the effects on their victims and attempted treatments.
This course is the capstone course of the Criminal Justice Leadership certificate program. Topics addressed will include the impact of generational change on law enforcement in the United States, recruiting and retaining qualified employees in the future and developing appropriate promotional processes. Prerequisite: Course must be taken in the last semester.
This course strives to depict the role of the forensic scientist in the criminal justice system. This course is designed for the non-scientific student. The course is a classroom introduction to the world of forensic science that includes Internet application, ability and limitations of the modern crime laboratory. Forensic science begins at the crime scene. If an investigator cannot recognize, collect and package evidence properly, no amount of equipment or expertise in the laboratory will salvage the situation.
This course is designed to evaluate computer crime in non-technological language while presenting all basic modern procedures needed to investigate and prosecute it. This course also covers both forensic and legal issues, addresses the First and Fourth Amendments, the U. S. Patriot Act, international collaborations, identity theft, SmartPhones, GPS navigation, Cloud computing, cyberbullying and cyberterrorism.
This course examines current research and theories of racial and ethnic discrimination within America's criminal justice system. This course will include the analysis of patterns of criminal behavior and victimization, police practices, course processing and sentencing, the death penalty and correctional programs. This course will incorporate discussion of all major race groups found in the United States.
This course provides an examination of the growth of community policing by reviewing and researching traditional policy, community relations and community policing. It includes a view of social, behavioral and operational issues that are fundamental to effective policy and community relations.
In this course, the student will develop a mature understanding of violence and abuse in intimate, dating and casual relationships. This understanding will be developed through an interdisciplinary perspective providing a contemporary view of the criminal justice experience with the diverse forms of violence and populations. This course will include dating violence, stalking, domestic violence and teen dating violence.
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the problem of juvenile delinquency. Topics include the history of juvenile delinquency and defining and measuring of juvenile delinquency in American society, theories of delinquency, the law enforcement role, juvenile court process, juvenile recidivism and the social and cultural influences involved in defining delinquency.
The purpose of this course is to point out why the evidence of the law court follows its present direction. Course content includes considering rules of evidence and rules of exclusion. Tests of admissible evidence applied by the courts, including direct and circumstantial evidence, will be covered.
This course will provide students with an understanding of the court system. Students will study the abilities courts have to regulate our lives, shape what is acceptable and what is forbidden. Students will also study how the court system works to avoid violating people's rights and liberties. This course covers topics such as the role of courts in modern society, pressure on the courts and how that pressure is handled, various levels of courts, professionals who work in the system, the role of the victim, rights of the defendant and a step-by-step program to show how a case works its way through the court system. Students may be required to attend a session in an actual courtroom at the discretion of the instructor.
This course is an in-depth historical look at terrorism and its origins, types and history that will provide the student with the knowledge necessary to understand the background of yesterday and the evolution of terrorism today. Religions and nations are covered in the investigation of terrorism, its many different factions and their relationships. Discussions will explore the kinds of efforts being expanded around the world to find ways to deter or discover terrorism and find other ways to deal with it. Students will examine what the future of terrorism might be in the 21st Century.
This course provides an introduction to the subject of school safety and the security of the students, staff and school assets. Topics that will be covered include vulnerability of schools to risks, access control, the role of the school resource officer, the security of data retained and maintained by the school, event security, school violence, as well as the risk factors associated with student mental health and behavioral issues.
This course introduces the student to the field of intelligence and the eligibility requirements to obtain a career in intelligence analysis at the governmental level. This course provides the student with an understanding of how intelligence systems function, how they fit within the policymaking systems of free societies, and how they are managed and controlled. The course will provide a theoretical overview of the intelligence field, including the psychology of intelligence, the main types of intelligence methods, the tools and techniques utilized by intelligence analysts, the differences between writing for research and writing for briefings, delivery and presentation techniques used to prepare intelligence briefings, basic data management strategies and tools, and various types of intelligence used throughout the public and private sectors.
This course is designed to provide the knowledge and skills needed to meet emergency first aid situations. There will be comprehensive training in recognition, evaluation and handling victims of illness or accidents. Students, after successful completion, will receive an American Heart Association Basic Life Support (BLS) card. Lab fee required.
This course is designed to be a foundation for students preparing to take MGF 1106, MGF 1107 or STA 2023. A strong emphasis will be placed on the application of linear equations and inequalities, systems of linear equations and quadratic equations. Topics also include real numbers and their properties, products and factoring, graphs and functions, counting methods, descriptive statistics as well as an introduction to probability and financial mathematics. Students who already have credit for MAT 1033 Intermediate Algebra do not need to take this course.
This is an intermediate course in formal algebra for students without a strong background in algebra. Topics include sets, the real number system and number properties, absolute value, products and factoring, algebraic fractions, linear and quadratic equations and inequalities with applications, systems of equations, radicals, rational exponents, graphs and relations and functions (four elective credits).
This course includes conditioning activities such as weight training, calisthenics and circuit training. May be taken four times for credit.
This course is designed to help students become more effective in college. The course teaches students how to set goals, manage time, improve retention of information, take notes, strengthen test-taking skills, deal with test anxiety, master stress reduction techniques, think critically, approach problems creatively, communicate more effectively, use the library and other college services, adapt to various instructional styles, understand their own learning style and identify and deal with problems (learning, personal or social) that interfere with their ability to learn, develop an appreciation for diversity and develop appropriate classroom behaviors. Lab fee required.

Any CCJ, CJC, CJE, CJJ, CJL, DSC or SLS prefix college credit course

This is a course in the process of expository writing. Students will read essays and compose papers that are unified, organized, logically developed and supported, clearly stated and well-focused. Research techniques are introduced and incorporated into at least one composition. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Students must pass the core assignments with a grade of "C" or higher. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Communications requirement for degree seeking students.
This is a course in the process of expository writing. Students will read essays and compose papers that are unified, organized, logically developed and supported, clearly stated and well-focused. Research techniques are introduced and incorporated into at least one composition. Some assignments may be coordinated with other Honors courses. Students must pass the core assignments with a grade of "C" or higher. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors coordinator. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Communications requirement for degree seeking students.
The purpose of this course is to improve the basic skills of speaking and listening. Class exercises emphasize preparing and delivering public speeches, speaking with clarity and variety and listening with literal and critical comprehension. The course addresses communication in the personal, career and global spheres.
This course introduces students to art from a variety of cultures and historical contexts. Topics include major art movements, varieties of materials and aesthetic theories. Coursework covers formal terms, elements and principles common to the study of art and architecture. The course stresses the relationship of design principles to various art forms including, but not limited to, sculpture, painting and architecture. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and analyze a variety of artistic styles, periods and media and students will have an increased vocabulary of art terminology. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for degree seeking students.
This humanities course is designed to introduce students to the critical study of human culture and its varied expressions across time. Students will employ interdisciplinary methods of analysis through engagement with diverse cultural artifacts in order to develop a foundational understanding of the human experience and its connection to culture. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for degree seeking students.
This humanities course is designed to introduce students to the critical study of human culture and its varied expressions across time. Students will employ interdisciplinary methods of analysis through engagement with diverse cultural artifacts in order to develop a foundational understanding of the human experience and its connection to culture. This course partially satisfies the writing requirements of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities for degree seeking students.
This course is designed to further student understanding of the concepts and applications of analytical and theoretical approaches to literature. Students will employ critical thinking in their interrogation of the texts. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for degree seeking students.
Open to all students, this course is designed for the musical layman and is a survey course devoted to music in world civilization. Included is a study of the music relating to the background of the life and other arts of the times. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for degree seeking students.
This course is designed for the musical layman and is a survey course devoted to music in world civilization. Included is a study of the music relating to the background of the life and other arts of the times. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for degree-seeking students. Honors level content. Permission from Honors Director required.
This course covers fundamental philosophical questions of the human condition including: discussions of existence, identity, ethics, culture, free will, personhood, politics, distributive justice, and much more. Students engage in deep critical thought, analysis of philosophical perspectives including their own, and ultimately gain perspective on how philosophy manifests itself in every aspect of our lived experience. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement.
This course covers fundamental philosophical questions of the human condition including: discussions of existence, identity, ethics, culture, free will, personhood, politics, distributive justice, and much more. Students engage in deep critical thought, analysis of philosophical perspectives including their own, and ultimately gain perspective on how philosophy manifests itself in every aspect of our lived experience. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement.
This course surveys the art of theatre. Students will learn about the process of creating theatre through study of the production process and the many artists who participate in the creation of theatre. Through videos and attendance at live theatre, students will also learn the various forms of theatre, such as tragedy and comedy and various modes of presentation, both presentational and representational. Students will also be introduced to theatre's historic roots and its diversity as expressed in various cultures throughout the globe. This course contains a reading and writing component. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B. E. 6A-10.030. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for degree seeking students.
This course is a survey of the elementary aspects of the astronomical universe. Topics include the history and growth of astronomy, instrumentation, solar system, stars, galaxies and cosmology. Star-gazing sessions and planetarium trips are included to identify the prominent constellations and stars. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This course is a survey of the elementary aspects of the astronomical universe. Topics include the history and growth of astronomy, instrumentation, solar system, stars, galaxies and cosmology. Star-gazing sessions and planetarium trips are included to identify the prominent constellations and stars. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This course is a study of the characteristics of living organisms. Unifying concepts such as metabolism, genetics, evolution and cellular organization will be investigated. Designed for non-science majors, this course does not fulfill the credit requirements for biology majors (see BSC 2010C). This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course is a study of the characteristics of living organisms. Unifying concepts such as metabolism, genetics, evolution and cellular organization will be investigated. Designed for non-science majors, this course does not fulfill the credit requirements for biology majors (see BSC 2010C). Honors level content. Permission from Honors Director required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science Requirement for A.A. degree-seeking students.
This course is a study of the characteristics of living organisms with emphasis on man. Unifying concepts such as metabolism, energy utilization and reproduction will be investigated. Laboratory exercises will emphasize basic principles of biology. Designed for non-science majors, this course does not fulfill the credit requirements for biology majors. Lab fee required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
Anatomy and Physiology I - Transfer

BSC 1085 is not offered at Seminole State College of Florida

This course is primarily for science majors or students with a strong biology background. It is a study of the molecular and cellular composition and function of living organisms. Emphasis will be given to structure, chemical metabolism and genetic mechanisms. Laboratory illustrates basic biological principles. Lab fee required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This is a one-semester course for the non-science major designed to meet the General Education requirement. Presumes no chemistry or mathematics background. Basic chemical principles are covered and related to larger topics that may include the chemistry of water and the atmosphere, energy sources, natural and man-made materials and environmental issues. Laboratory exercises during the lecture may be used to complement course material. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This is a one-semester course for the non-science major designed to meet the General Education requirement. Presumes no chemistry or mathematics background. Basic chemical principles are covered and related to larger topics that may include the chemistry of water and the atmosphere, energy sources, natural and man-made materials and environmental issues. Laboratory exercises during the lecture may be used to complement course material. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This is a one-semester course for the non-science major designed to meet the General Education requirement. Presumes no chemistry or mathematics background. Basic chemical principles are covered and related to larger topics that may include the chemistry of water and the atmosphere, energy sources, natural and man-made materials and environmental issues. Laboratory experiments are chosen that support these topics. Lab fee required. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This course serves as the first semester of the two-semester general chemistry sequence. Topics covered include problem-solving, atomic and molecular structure, chemical formulas and nomenclature, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, bonding models, gas laws, solutions and other selected topics. Laboratory experiments are chosen that support these topics. Lab fee required. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This course serves as the first semester of the two-semester general chemistry sequence. Topics covered include problem-solving, atomic and molecular structure, chemical formulas and nomenclature, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, bonding models, gas laws, solutions and other selected topics. Laboratory experiments are chosen that support these topics. Lab fee required. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This course will introduce students to the Earth as a complex and dynamic system. Focus will be on the solid Earth, the oceans, the atmosphere and interactions among these subsystems. Students will learn of the Earth's origin and place within the solar system. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree-seeking students.
This is a three-credit-hour General Education course with no prerequisites. Students will study the impact of human systems on the physical and biological environment as well as discuss possible solutions to today's environmental problems. Topics include ecology, natural resources, energy, pollution, population growth, urbanization and sustainability. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This is a three-credit hour General Education course. Students will study the impact of human systems on the physical and biological environment as well as discuss possible solutions to today's environmental problems. Topics include ecology, natural resources, energy, pollution, population growth, urbanization and sustainability. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This is a four-credit-hour General Education course with no prerequisites. Students will study the impact of human systems on the physical and biological environment as well as discuss possible solutions to today's environmental problems. Topics include ecology, natural resources, energy, pollution, population growth, urbanization and sustainability. The laboratory will give students an analytical learning experience in environmental science, as well as teach them to apply the learned concepts to real world problems and issues. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This course is for non-science majors. Fundamental concepts of physics with application of everyday experiences are covered. Topics include kinematics, mechanics, electricity and magnetism and special topics. This course is designed to give the student a working knowledge of the physical factors in our environment. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This course contains a descriptive and quantitative study of kinematics, mechanics, energy and applications of mechanics. This course meets the requirements for professional and technical students needing an algebra-based physics course. Lab fee required. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This physics course is designed for science, engineering and mathematics majors. Topics studied are kinematics, mechanics and applications of mechanics. Lab fee required. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This honors physics course is designed for science, engineering and mathematics majors. Topics studied are kinematics, mechanics and applications of mechanics. Lab is included. Lab fee required. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This course is a study of the fundamental topics in advanced algebra with emphasis on applications, the understanding of the function concept and manipulative skills. Major topics include operations on algebraic expressions and complex numbers, solving polynomial equations and inequalities, absolute value equations and inequalities and rational equations and inequalities, applications, functions, exponents and logarithms, graphs of polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions and systems of equations and inequalities. The use of graphing calculators will be incorporated throughout the course. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for degree seeking students.
This is a first course in analytic geometry and the theory and application of calculus. Selected topics include a review of functions, limits and continuity, the derivative, differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions and their inverses, the Mean Value and Intermediate Value Theorems, extrema and graph sketching, area and the definite integral, anti-differentiation and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and integration of transcendental functions and their inverses. A graphing calculator will be used throughout the course. Students should ask the instructor which calculator will be used. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for degree seeking students.
This is a first course in analytic geometry and the theory and application of calculus. Selected topics include a review of functions, limits and continuity, the derivative, differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions and their inverses, the Mean Value and Intermediate Value Theorems, extrema and graph sketching, area and the definite integral, anti-differentiation and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and integration of transcendental functions and their inverses. The graphing calculator will be used throughout the course. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for degree seeking students.
The following topics will be covered in this course: sets and Venn diagrams, logic, inductive and deductive reasoning, counting principles, permutations and combinations, probability, descriptive statistics and geometry. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for degree seeking students. It is recommended that students without college-level math credits have completed a secondary-level course in Geometry, Algebra 2, Precalculus, Calculus, or Math for College Liberal Arts with a grade of ‘B’ or higher before taking this course.
This course provides an opportunity for students to see mathematics used in ways not seen in traditional mathematics courses. Topics are selected from the following: financial mathematics, numbers and number systems, elementary number theory and graph theory. Additional topics may be included at the discretion of the instructor. History of mathematics, critical thinking skills, problem-solving techniques and the appropriate use of technology will be used throughout the course. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for degree seeking students. It is recommended that students without college-level math credits have completed a secondary-level course in Geometry, Algebra 2, Precalculus, Calculus, or Math for College Liberal Arts with a grade of ‘B’ or higher before taking this course.
This course introduces descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, two-sample inferences, correlation and regression and nonparametric tests. This course is a first course in statistical methods for those students entering a science or business-related field. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for degree seeking students. It is recommended that students without college-level math credits have completed a secondary-level course in Geometry, Algebra 2, Precalculus, Calculus, or Math for College Statistics with a grade of ‘B’ or higher before taking this course.
This Honors course introduces descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, two-sample inferences, correlation and regression and nonparametric tests. This course is a first course in statistical methods and involves Honors students in projects and development of portfolios. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for degree seeking students. It is recommended that students without college-level math credits have completed a secondary-level course in Geometry, Algebra 2, Precalculus, Calculus, or Math for College Statistics with a grade of ‘B’ or higher before taking this course.

* POS 2041 or POS 2041H partially satisfies the Civic Literacy requirement. Students entering the Florida College System for the first time in Fall 2022 or later can satisfy the Civic Literacy requirement by passing a course and an assessment.   Refer to the online catalog for assessment options.

In this course basic aspects of the federal government are studied. Emphasis is placed upon content and interpretation of the Constitution, Federalism, the Congress, the Presidency, the federal court system and the citizen's connection to the federal government by means of elections, political parties, interest groups and public opinion. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for A.A. degree seeking students and the Florida state civic literacy requirement per Florida Statues Section 1007.25 for all students.
In this course, basic aspects of the federal government are studied. Emphasis is placed upon content and interpretation of the Constitution, Federalism, the Congress, the Presidency, the federal court system and the citizen's connection to the federal government by means of elections, political parties, interest groups and public opinion. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for A.A. degree seeking students and the Florida state civic literacy requirement per Florida Statues Section 1007.25 for all students.
Total Credits: 60

General Education Core Course. Denotes that a class is a State of Florida General Education Core Course.

Prior to the award of an associate in arts or baccalaureate degree, first-time-in-college students entering a Florida College System institution in the Fall 2015 term and thereafter must complete at least one (1) course from each of the general education subject areas listed in this section. Beginning in the 2022-23 academic year and thereafter, students entering associate in arts, associate in science or associate in applied science, or baccalaureate degree programs must complete at least one (1) course from each of the general education subject areas listed in this section prior to the awarding of their degree. Please refer to this catalog's Graduation Requirements section for specific requirements on the General Education Core Courses.

The State of Florida requires that all students graduating from Seminole State College of Florida and other institutions in the Florida College System (FCS), as well as from any State University System (SUS) institution, fulfill a Civic Literacy Competency requirement prior to submitting an Intent to Graduate form in the term they plan to graduate. Requirements vary based on admit term and program. Please refer to this catalog’s Graduation Requirements section for specific requirements on the Civic Literacy Proficiency Requirement.

Your tuition shouldn’t go against your intuition.

Your pursuit of higher education is admirable. So why struggle with high tuition in the process? Here we make life’s next steps affordable. Whether you’re seeking a university transfer (A.A.) degree, a four-year bachelor’s, an Associate in Science degree or even earning a technical certificate, you’ll find reasonable tuition and great value. And to us, that’s scholarly.

In fact, a full-time college education at Seminole State is more than $10,000 less each year than most state universities.

Go For Less.


Tuition and Fee Comparison*

 Seminole StateUFFSUUCF
Tuition and Fees$3,131$6,380$6,538$6,379
Room and Board-0-$10,400$11,472$10,300
Books and Supplies$1,000$810$1,000$1,200
Total$4,131$17,590$19,010$17,879

For more information on Seminole State's tuition and fees, please see the 2021-22 fee schedule.

* Tuition costs are based on Fall 2021 and Spring 2022 terms, with 15 credit hours per term for in-state students. Dorm fees, meal plans and book expenses are estimates based on information provided on each university's website. Lab fees and other fees that may be assessed at the time of registration may be viewed in the College fee schedule. As Seminole State is a commuter college with no residence halls on its campuses, costs for room and board are not calculated.

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