Digital Media Associate in Science

For Spring Term 2021, we are offering in-person, hybrid, remote and online  courses.  
For more information, view class types

Digital media is everywhere. It’s in everything we do. Learn the skills and theories behind conveying information to your audience with creativity so your message makes an impact. With hands-on training from instructors with extensive experience, you can build a powerful portfolio showcasing your talent and skills that will land you your dream job.

Related Programs

Getting Started: Spring Term 2021

Oct. 1:  Financial Aid


Jan. 4:  Application


Jan. 11:  Classes Begin

Other Important Dates »

Why Seminole State?

  • Affordable tuition: Earn a state university education at about half the cost.
  • Small class sizes: With classes of 30 or less, you don’t have to learn in an auditorium.
  • Online degree option: Most courses for our A.S. degrees are offered in person and online, so you can study when and where you want. 
  • Seamless transitionMost A.S. graduates earn credits that can be applied to a bachelor's degree at Seminole State or at the University of Central Florida through DirectConnect™ to UCF.*
  • Job Placement: According to state data, most Seminole State A.S. programs have placement rates above 90 percent.

*A.S. students who are planning to transfer to bachelor's degree programs should meet with a counselor, advisor or specialist to make sure the required courses are taken and the entry requirements are met.

Additional Information

Digital Media
Type: Associate in Science
Major Code: GRDIG-AS
CIP: 1611080300
Educational Pathway: GRDIG-AS

Program Description

Available Course Course Not Offered Spring 2021
This course explores the avenues of contemporary digital design, highlighting the importance of process, innovation and communication. Students will become familiar with design projects ranging from traditional print, sophisticated websites, interactive digital media and motion graphics. The course will focus on developing and refining the design concept and the execution strategy. Lab fee required.
This course is an introduction to the concepts and principles of digital imaging and the tools and techniques of image capture, creation, manipulation and integration of still images. Students will understand composition, layout, color theory, image capture and output using industry-standard software. Lab fee required.
This course covers the foundations of interactive media including user-interface design concept, optimization/performance issues, resources and tools. Students combine audio, video, imaging, animation and other media formats to construct an interactive product using industry-standard software. Lab fee required.
This course prepares students for professional situations through the creation of individual demo reels, resumes, websites and portfolios by emphasizing business structure. Topics such as studio hierarchy, production bidding, media distribution and professional growth will be included to highlight many of the important aspects of business in order for students to attain and sustain a professional career. Lab fee required.
This course is designed for beginning Adobe Illustrator users. Fundamental concepts and features are introduced and applied to a variety of graphics applications. The world of vector graphics and professional illustrations is entered, explored and applied to a variety of graphic endeavors. Lab fee required.
This course is an introduction to Photoshop software which provides an extensive variety of electronic tools for manipulating photographs and creating illustrations. The course is designed for the graphics individual who wishes to integrate photography with page layouts. Students will learn the basics of scanning, retouching, color correcting, proofing and output to printer devices. Lab fee required.
This course is designed to explore the current technologies associated with Web 2.0 and social media. Topics to be covered include social networking etiquette, Real Simple Syndication (RSS), tagging, Consumer-Generated Content (CGC), blogs, wikis and podcasting. Student knowledge in the historical perspectives, prevailing definitions and industry-wide applications of Web 2.0 and social media tools will be extended. Lab fee required.
This course is an introduction to the concepts, principles, tools and techniques of producing, assembling and mixing digital video and audio. Students will understand story, creativity, planning and organizational skills as a part of the production process. Lab fee required.
This course is designed to teach the concepts, terminology and principles of desktop publishing using industry computer software to communicate visual concepts used for the printing of publications such as brochures, advertisements, books and magazines. The student will develop the skills necessary to create publications designed for print publishing and production. Lab fee required.
This is an advanced course in page layout software. Designed to teach advanced techniques and principles of digital publishing to assist students in gaining stronger creative control and improved production capabilities. Students create publications displaying multi-faceted integration of sophisticated text and graphic techniques. Emphasis will focus on the development of long-page publications and Internet connectivity. Lab fee required.
This course includes the design and preparation of websites, including the Web home page. Focus is from a graphics point of view and emphasis is on the importance of Web page design and layout. The course is taught using various software programs. Basics of HTML for the Web will be introduced. Lab fee required.
This course is designed for experienced Adobe Illustrator users. Advanced concepts, features and techniques are further enhanced and applied to graphic applications. The world of vector graphics, the Web Internet and professional illustrations are further explored. Lab fee required.
This course teaches typography as a primary tool of all graphic designers. The emphasis of the course is in the elements and anatomy of type and its expressive, technical and visual aspects. This course also teaches typeface, size, leading, line length, headlines, grids, hierarchy and the overall character in developing creative elements. Readability in type is examined in the development of publications - ads, books, brochures, identity systems and posters.
This is a course for experienced Photoshop software graphic design users who wish to expand their skills in the application of this electronic tool for manipulating photographs and illustrations. The course introduces new features, tips and techniques for using these electronic tools. The goal is to apply more controls and improve production capabilities. Lab fee required.
This course introduces students to web design for mobile devices. Topics include planning an effective mobile website, industry standard Mobile Markup Language, CSS, mobile commerce, social media, testing and publishing. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to plan, develop, test and publish web content designed for mobile devices. Lab fee required.
This course covers fundamental design and programming principles for computer games and simulations. Topics include discrete event simulation, gaming and simulations design and general gaming/simulation programming.
This course covers the basic concepts of computer programming. Students use a structured approach using the Java programming language to design and program logic techniques such as iteration, initialization, conditional processing, accumulation and sequencing. Also considered are programming style and program efficiency. Logic techniques and data formats are illustrated using high level programming languages. This class utilizes classroom lecture and hands-on programming exercises. A working knowledge of the Windows PC including starting programs, saving files and copying files is required. Lab fee required.
This course provides an introduction to object-oriented programming using the Java programming language. Students will design, build, test and debug computer applications that utilize classes, objects, inheritance, polymorphism and interfaces. Lab fee required.
This course is designed to teach beginning level 3D animation for digital media. Emphasis will be placed on viewing the world in three dimensions as opposed to a single flat plane and training the eye to see shape instead of line. It will allow students to comprehend fully visual concepts such as light and shadow, foreshortening, color recognition and modeling techniques. Other topics include NURBS vs. polygons, texturing, lighting, rendering and keyframe animation. Lab fee required.
This course gives the student an in-depth look at character design, development, rigging and animation. Character creation will include segmented and solid model mesh of bipeds and quadrupeds. Students will examine techniques used to create facial expressions and lip sync using phonemes. Lab fee required.
This course focuses on digital post-production used for film, animation, video, digital media and the Web. This course identifies production methods, compositing and sophisticated motion control for high-quality, two-dimensional animation. Focus is placed on digital media components, video tape and screen outputs for special and specialty projects while exploring foundations for computer-aided digital production. The topic of work flow issues and the variety of design and production vehicles will be addressed. Lab fee required.
This is an advanced course in computer graphics in the design profession. Students will use the computer to create original artwork and illustrations that will be used in professional publications. Advanced concepts, features and professional illustration are further explored. Lab fee required.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
Credit for this course is awarded to entering students with appropriate scores on the International Baccalaureate examination in Visual Arts.
Credit for this course is awarded to entering students with appropriate scores on the International Baccalaureate examination in Visual Arts.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
This is an art travel/study course combining preparation on campus, travel and study. Content is variable depending on the program in which the student enrolls and the specific topics to be covered. Students must be 18 years of age on or before departure.
This course is designed for students who require or are interested in basic aspects of data mining and analytics using domain-specific data. Students learn the computerized techniques by which to organize, manipulate, report, present, depict and analyze domain-specific data in order to find or otherwise derive information.
This course will provide basic knowledge of the various aspects of the game industry. Topics covered include types of game development careers, game development and design processes, marketing themes, copyright laws, game company structures, various types of programming languages used by different types of games and the impact of video games on modern society. Students will learn general programming concepts and common game development environments. Lab fee required.
This course covers fundamental design and programming principles for computer games and simulations. Topics include discrete event simulation, gaming and simulations design and general gaming/simulation programming.
This course extends the concepts covered in CAP 2801 to include advanced discrete simulation and video game programming principles. Topics include advanced simulation models, simulation and video game programming languages and programming real world simulation systems.
This course is an introduction to data structures, algorithms, programming methodologies and software architectures in support of computer simulation. Topics include lists, queues, sets, trees, searching, sorting, reusable code and order of complexity. Simulation structures developed include event lists, time management and queuing models. Software models are implemented and tested.
This course covers the basic concepts of computer programming. Students use a structured approach using the Java programming language to design and program logic techniques such as iteration, initialization, conditional processing, accumulation and sequencing. Also considered are programming style and program efficiency. Logic techniques and data formats are illustrated using high level programming languages. This class utilizes classroom lecture and hands-on programming exercises. A working knowledge of the Windows PC including starting programs, saving files and copying files is required. Lab fee required.
Students will learn the Visual Basic programming language through classroom lectures and hands-on lab exercises. Topics covered include selection statements, iteration, event-driven programming, data files, databases, menus and ActiveX controls. Lab fee required.
An introduction to the Python programming language to include control data structures, functions and web implementation.
This course provides an introduction to object-oriented programming and the C++ programming language. Students will create, document, run and debug programs using computer facilities on campus. Key topics include variables, classes, objects, selection, iteration, strings, arrays, pointers and functions. Lab fee required.
The student applies the Visual C++ programming language to more advanced problems by designing, implementing and documenting computer applications. Key topics include class constructors and destructors, function overloading, operator overloading, dynamic memory allocation, encapsulation, inheritance and polymorphism. Selected classes from the C++ Standard Template Library (STL) are also covered. Lab fee required.
This course provides an introduction to the C# programming language. Students will learn the basic features of the language, including selection, iteration, data types and scope. In addition, the course will cover the object-oriented aspects of the language including encapsulation, inheritance and polymorphism. Lab fee required.
In this course, the student will use the more advanced features of the C# programming language to create complex applications that utilize graphical user interfaces, databases, multithreading, Internet communications and multimedia. Lab fee required.
This course is an introduction to creating Android mobile applications. The student is introduced to the Android development environment and development tools. Significant time is spent learning the Java programming language. Java topics include data types, variables, expressions, selection, iteration, methods, classes, objects and object-oriented concepts. Android applications are developed with basic user interface objects and layouts. A mobile device is not required.
This course focuses on developing applications for the Android mobile application platform. It assumes the student has a basic understanding of Java gained through the prerequisite course. User interface widgets (Views) and advanced layout options will be covered. Medium-to-advanced features such as using graphics, images, audio and video in apps will be covered. In addition, apps saving data using a database, using location-based services and tracking motion using the accelerometer will be developed. The business of distributing, marketing and selling Android applications will be addressed. A mobile device is not required.
This course provides an introduction to object-oriented programming using the Java programming language. Students will design, build, test and debug computer applications that utilize classes, objects, inheritance, polymorphism and interfaces. Lab fee required.
In this course the student will learn the more advanced features of the Java programming language and object-oriented programming. Advanced Java applications will be created that utilize graphical user interfaces, data structures, databases, multithreading, Internet communications and multimedia. Lab fee required.
This course uses Visual Basic to solve advanced programming problems. Topics covered include advanced Windows controls, Internet controls, ActiveX controls, ActiveX documents, Multiple Documents Interface (MDI) applications, Dynamic Link Libraries (DLLs), the Component Object Model (COM) and class modules. This class utilizes classroom lectures and hands-on programming exercises. Lab fee required.
Web Applications introduces students to the art of web development by using industry standard tools and scripts to construct commercial-grade web pages. The course will cover the software tools available to create and develop web pages as well as hands-on experience configuring a variety of software used on a website. Lab fee required.
Web Programming I will focus on the skills required for web application development using XHTML, client-side scripting and basic server-side scripts. This course will explore the syntax, semantics and limitations of page layout, Cascading Style Sheets and basic scripting. Implementation of server-side scripting will be covered as it pertains to form processing. Examples of tools, W3 standards and cross-browser compatibility will also be examined. Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to design, program and publish a commercial-grade website. Lab fee required.
This course will teach the student how to build applications based on JavaScript technologies. Topics covered include working with Node.js, JSON, REST, NoSQL databases and popular JavaScript application frameworks. Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to build a rich internet application based on front-end technologies.
Databases drive today's e-commerce websites. This course demonstrates how to leverage the power of a relational database through the use of SQL and server-side scripting. The student will explore server-side scripts in a variety of languages to provide dynamic website content. The course will demonstrate how to connect to data from standard ODBC-compliant databases and create database-driven websites. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to design, develop and publish a dynamic database-driven application suitable for use in business or e-commerce. Lab fee required.
This course introduces the student to modern web development with a client-side JavaScript framework, a service tier and a back-end database. The student constructs a sample web application and studies topics such as constructing forms, using CSS frameworks, source control and deployment.
In this course, topics of current interest are presented in group instruction. Lab fee required.
In this course, topics of current interest are presented via individual or group instruction. Generally, the student will work with a faculty member to explore a subject not covered in the standard curriculum.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
This course explores the concepts of object-oriented programming, including abstraction, encapsulation, inheritance and polymorphism. The applications developed will focus on extracting objects from a problem domain and designing solutions based on passing messages between objects. Implementation will be done in a current object-oriented language.
This course includes advanced programming topics such as multithreading, libraries, exception handling, GUI, networks, memory allocation, database connection and cross-platform development issues.
This course is an in-depth study of database management systems. The course focuses on the relational database which is the most common model used by businesses. Key topics include an overview of database systems, database design, the relational model, physical design, indexing, transaction management, concurrency management, recovery and tuning. In addition, some non-relational topics will be addressed such as data warehousing, decision support and data mining databases.
Students will study the most widely used mobile development environments used by businesses. A hands-on environment will be provided by implementing a common solution using multiple development environments and multiple devices.
This course covers the development of distributed multi-tier, web-based applications using the Java programming language. The use of the current Java Platform and Enterprise Edition (EE) platform will be integral to this process. Key topics include Enterprise Java Beans (EJB), web services, profiles, servlets and Java Server Pages (JSP).
This course explores the avenues of contemporary digital design, highlighting the importance of process, innovation and communication. Students will become familiar with design projects ranging from traditional print, sophisticated websites, interactive digital media and motion graphics. The course will focus on developing and refining the design concept and the execution strategy. Lab fee required.
This course provides a broad introduction to sound design principles as applied to moving pictures and interactive systems. Creative use of sound is explored through an introduction to field recording and the use of digital audio workstations. Students use original sound recordings from other departments as well as those sampled from an extensive sound library in order to create sound pieces both with and without images. Lab fee required.
This course gives the student an in-depth look at character design, development, rigging and animation. Character creation will include segmented and solid model mesh of bipeds and quadrupeds. Students will examine techniques used to create facial expressions and lip sync using phonemes. Lab fee required.
This course is designed to teach an intermediate level of three-dimensional animation for digital media. Emphasis is placed on building 3D world space that tells a story. It will allow students to build upon concepts such as environments, physical motion and modeling techniques, rendering and post-production. Lab fee required.
This course focuses on digital post-production used for film, animation, video, digital media and the Web. This course identifies production methods, compositing and sophisticated motion control for high-quality, two-dimensional animation. Focus is placed on digital media components, video tape and screen outputs for special and specialty projects while exploring foundations for computer-aided digital production. The topic of work flow issues and the variety of design and production vehicles will be addressed. Lab fee required.
This course includes 2D tools for compositing, animation, and effects that digital media professionals, web designers, and video professionals use. Fundamentals in the design of composited layers are combined with sophisticated visuals and audio effects for animations. Students are also introduced to the use of digital assets created in object-oriented and digital imaging software.
This course prepares students for professional situations through the creation of individual demo reels, resumes, websites and portfolios by emphasizing business structure. Topics such as studio hierarchy, production bidding, media distribution and professional growth will be included to highlight many of the important aspects of business in order for students to attain and sustain a professional career. Lab fee required.
In this course, topics of current interest are presented in group instruction.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
The course includes beginning theory and practices as a platform to springboard into live sound reinforcement as well as recording and broadcasting technology, incorporating the signal processing and hands-on techniques found in a myriad of real world applications. The eventual goal is to learn to incorporate audio gear for optimum performance in a variety of professional operations.
The purpose of this course is to develop skills in using more advanced equipment for television production and to apply these skills in producing television programs. The course will stress writing, producing, directing and editing television programs. Lab fee required.
This course teaches students procedures and practices of directing a variety of television productions. Emphasis will be placed on working with writers and producers in directing programs from concept to product. Lab fee required.
In this course, students will learn editing techniques and other post-production processes, including A/B roll editing, digital video effects, electronic graphics and audio mixing. Students will be introduced to non-linear editing systems. Lab fee required.
This course will instruct students to operate non-linear editing systems focusing on AVID technologies. Students will become familiar with software applications related to special effects, audio enhancements and image manipulation. Lab fee required.
This is the capstone course for the TV and Film program. Students will produce a demonstration reel exhibiting their best work in all areas of pre-production, production and post-production. The course should be a benefit to students seeking employment or wishing to transfer to a senior institution. Lab fee required.
In this course, topics of current interest are presented in group instruction. This course may be taken four times for credit. Lab fee required.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
This course is a three-dimensional CAD course which introduces the student to Autodesk Revit Software. The student learns to work with architectural computer models rather than the basic geometric drawing approach. The Revit platform for building information modeling is a complete design and documentation solution which supports all phases of design, drawing production and schedule development for a given project. This software allows the student to work in various views of the parametric building model at the same time.
This course is a three-dimensional CAD course which introduces the student to advanced concepts in Autodesk Revit Software. The student continues to learn how to draw and design in a three-dimensional architectural computer model format. Advanced concepts in three-dimensional modeling are introduced and implemented in class projects. This software allows the student to work in various views of the parametric building model at the same time. Each view may be opened separately and any changes that are made in one drawing are immediately updated in all other views. The Revit platform for building information modeling also allows the student to identify and produce a material list (automatically) for every item required for a particular design as the design develops and changes. This becomes an invaluable tool for the estimating and scheduling functions required by the contractor.
This course is scheduled for individual students who wish to explore topics not covered in the curriculum. The student must present a design of study (learning contract) to the faculty member who is to direct the work. Approval from the dean or director is required prior to registration.
In this course, topics of current interest are presented in group instruction. This is a project-based class. Project is selected by the student and approved by the instructor. Lab fee required.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
This course presents site plan development, including contour revisions, grading, drainage, utilities and street and road layout. Pipe drawings, both flat and pictorial, utility and working drawings and extensive civil, three-dimensional applications will be included. Students will learn to plan, prepare and interpret engineering drawings. The student will learn the use of drafting equipment and computers to design and draft mechanical, architectural, civil, electrical, structural building systems and related areas.
In this course, topics of current interest are presented in individual or group instructional format. This is a project-based class. The project is selected by the student and approved by the instructor. The instructor works one-on-one with the student to complete the work as required.
The Introduction to Computer Graphics course is designed to familiarize publishing, graphic, art and multi-media students with the basics of hardware and software of the computer system for electronic publishing. Students will be familiarized with commercial graphic design and printing issues as applied to publishing systems. Lab fee required.
This course is designed to teach the concepts, terminology and principles of desktop publishing using industry computer software to communicate visual concepts used for the printing of publications such as brochures, advertisements, books and magazines. The student will develop the skills necessary to create publications designed for print publishing and production. Lab fee required.
This is an advanced course in page layout software. Designed to teach advanced techniques and principles of digital publishing to assist students in gaining stronger creative control and improved production capabilities. Students create publications displaying multi-faceted integration of sophisticated text and graphic techniques. Emphasis will focus on the development of long-page publications and Internet connectivity. Lab fee required.
This course is a foundation to computer-aided digital publishing. It will explore various means of viewing visual elements in design. Focus is upon the foundations of professional design skills for computer graphics, multimedia, film and video and animation. Various media are used to explore traditional media, photography, illustration, animation, film and video and other image media development. The student is introduced to typography, typeface and type as a design element as well as composition, layout, pagination, style, balance, format and project planning. Lab fee required.
This course is an introduction to Photoshop software which provides an extensive variety of electronic tools for manipulating photographs and creating illustrations. The course is designed for the graphics individual who wishes to integrate photography with page layouts. Students will learn the basics of scanning, retouching, color correcting, proofing and output to printer devices. Lab fee required.
This course teaches typography as a primary tool of all graphic designers. The emphasis of the course is in the elements and anatomy of type and its expressive, technical and visual aspects. This course also teaches typeface, size, leading, line length, headlines, grids, hierarchy and the overall character in developing creative elements. Readability in type is examined in the development of publications - ads, books, brochures, identity systems and posters.
In this course topics of current interest are presented in group instruction.
In this course topics of current interest are presented in group instruction.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
A global, multi-cultural experience has become an increasingly vital part of a student’s education. This study abroad course provides students with opportunities to explore significant international, historical and contemporary sites. Students are exposed to the cultural influences of the arts, graphic arts and architecture. Lectures and course work are complimented by walking tours led by experienced faculty and guest professionals. Students must be 18 years of age on or before departure.
This is a course in the process of expository writing. Students will read essays and compose papers that are unified, organized, logically developed and supported, clearly stated and well-focused. Research techniques are introduced and incorporated into at least one composition. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Students must pass the core assignments with a grade of "C" or higher. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Communications requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.

Recommended:

This course is an integrated study of the main developments of the visual art forms (architecture, sculpture and painting) from Paleolithic man to the Early Renaissance. World art will be integrated into the content. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.

Recommended:

This course is an integrated study of the main developments of the visual art forms (architecture, sculpture and painting) from the 16th century to the present. World art will be integrated into the content. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This humanities course is designed to introduce students to the critical study of human culture and its varied expressions across time. Students will employ interdisciplinary methods of analysis through engagement with diverse cultural artifacts in order to develop a foundational understanding of the human experience and its connection to culture. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for A.A. degree-seeking students.
This humanities course is designed to introduce students to the critical study of human culture and its varied expressions across time. Students will employ interdisciplinary methods of analysis through engagement with diverse cultural artifacts in order to develop a foundational understanding of the human experience and its connection to culture. This course partially satisfies the writing requirements of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities for A.A. degree seeking students.
A course designed to promote the understanding and appreciation of humankind's cultural heritage in the prehistoric, Egyptian, Mesopotamian, Judaic, Greek and Roman periods. Representative works in art, music, literature and philosophy will be studied. Global culturalism will be incorporated into the course content. The student will be introduced to Internet resources as they pertain to appropriate thematic materials. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to promote the understanding and appreciation of humankind's cultural heritage in the Early Christian and Medieval periods. Representative works in art, music, literature and philosophy will be studied. Global culturalism will be incorporated into the course content. The student will be introduced to Internet resources as they pertain to appropriate thematic materials. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to promote the understanding and appreciation of the creative process and world culture. Representative works in art, literature, music and philosophy will be studied from the Renaissance and Baroque periods. Global culturalism will be incorporated into the course content. The student will be introduced to Internet resources as they pertain to appropriate thematic materials. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to promote the understanding and appreciation of the creative process and world culture. Representative works in art, literature, music and philosophy will be studied from the Enlightenment and Romantic periods. Global culturalism will be incorporated into the course content. The student will be introduced to Internet resources as they pertain to appropriate thematic materials. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to study representative works of the 20th and early 21st centuries in the performing arts, visual arts, music, literature, film and philosophy so that the student will appreciate the foundations of the 20th century and allow projections into the future. Global culturalism will be incorporated into the course content. The student will be introduced to Internet resources as they pertain to appropriate thematic materials. This course will also show how technology interacts with culture in the contemporary world. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to study representative works of the 20th and early 21st centuries in the performing arts, visual arts, music, literature, film and philosophy so that the student will appreciate the foundations of the 20th century and allow projections into the future. Global culturalism will be incorporated into the course content. The student will be introduced to Internet resources as they pertain to appropriate thematic materials. This course will also show how technology interacts with culture in the contemporary world. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to introduce the student to the contributions of women in the humanities. It will examine their contributions to literature, art and music from the Classical period to the present day. Students will learn how gender has influenced production of the arts throughout these periods. Examining notions of masculinity and femininity will be a key component of the course and their various representations in art, literature and music will be a major subject of study. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to introduce the student to the contributions of women in the humanities. It will examine their contributions to literature, art and music from the Classical period to the present day. Students will learn how gender has influenced production of the arts throughout these periods. Examining notions of masculinity and femininity will be a key component of the course and their various representations in art, literature and music will be a major subject of study. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to introduce the student to the Indian and Southeast Asian cultures. Emphasis will be placed on the basic myths underlying culture, their manifestation in the arts and their diffusion throughout South and Southeast Asia. Representative works in literature, mythology, philosophy and the visual arts will be studied. The student will be introduced to Internet resources as they pertain to appropriate thematic materials. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
Honors Asian Humanities is designed to introduce the student to the cultures of India, Tibet and Southeast Asia. The basic myths underlying culture will be studied as well as their manifestation in the arts. The course will explore the development of Indian thought with special emphasis on early Buddhism and the development of Mahayana Buddhist schools. Representative works in literature, mythology, philosophy and the visual arts will be studied. Archeological rites in Cambodia, Burma and Thailand will be studied as examples of myth in architecture. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to explore African American cultures and artistic manifestations and to promote increased awareness, understanding, degrees of tolerance and aesthetic appreciation of African American heritage. Pre-European African influences to modern cultural values of African American societies will be examined. Contemplative objects representing both visual and performing arts will be studied in their historical context. The student will be introduced to Internet resources as they pertain to appropriate thematic materials. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to explore African American cultures and artistic manifestations and to promote increased awareness, understanding, degrees of tolerance and aesthetic appreciation of African American heritage. Pre-European African influences to modern cultural values of African American societies will be examined. Contemplative objects representing both visual and performing arts will be studied in their historical context. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to introduce the student to Latin American cultures and to promote the understanding and appreciation of its cultural heritage. Ancient to modern cultures will be surveyed. Emphasis will be placed on cultural roots and myth as well as artists' commitment to social and political struggle. Representative works in the visual arts, literature and music will be studied. No knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese is required. The student will be introduced to Internet resources as they pertain to appropriate thematic materials. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to introduce the student to Latin American cultures and to promote the understanding and appreciation of Latin American heritage. Ancient to modern cultures will be surveyed. Emphasis will be placed on cultural roots and myth as well as artists' commitment to social and political struggle. Representative works in the visual arts, literature and music will be studied. No knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese is required. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to introduce students to the cultural contributions of members of the LGBTQ community and to promote a better understanding, awareness and appreciation for this culture's unique traditions. Emphasis will be placed on the origins of the culture and on the historical context of the production and use of artistic creation. Expressive cultural artifacts will be the primary focus of study. These include visual and performance art as well as works of literature. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course covers the study of fundamental philosophical problems and concepts. Speculation about limits of human understanding, value judgments, foundations of morality and speculation about the existence of God in order to present students with the tools for constructing their own philosophy. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
The course covers the study of fundamental philosophical problems and concepts. Speculation about limits of human understanding, value judgments, foundations of morality and speculation about the existence of God will be covered in order to present students with the tools for constructing their own philosophy. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
Discussions of the moral problems of contemporary society such as abortion, the sexual revolution, war, violence, aging, civil disobedience, modern medical practices and other issues take place in this course. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is an ideological study of the major religions of the world emphasizing the relationships of their major tenets to our modern society. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
American Literature I is a survey of the historical and cultural development of American belles-lettres from 1630 to the late nineteenth century with attention to the influence of prevalent ideas and expressions of the age. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is a survey of the historical and cultural development of American literature from the late nineteenth through the twentieth century. It focuses on the fiction, poetry and drama that precede and constitute the Modern Era. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course will provide a brief, but comprehensive study of the writing styles of selected African American writers. This study will include a historical perspective of the racial climate in American society, the connection between literature by African Americans and will examine current criticism on selected texts. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course introduces students to art from a variety of cultures and historical contexts. Topics include major art movements, varieties of materials and aesthetic theories. Coursework covers formal terms, elements and principles common to the study of art and architecture. The course stresses the relationship of design principles to various art forms including, but not limited to, sculpture, painting and architecture. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and analyze a variety of artistic styles, periods and media and students will have an increased vocabulary of art terminology. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course is an integrated study of the main developments of the visual art forms (architecture, sculpture and painting) from Paleolithic man to the Early Renaissance. World art will be integrated into the content. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is an integrated study of the main developments of the visual art forms (architecture, sculpture and painting) from the 16th century to the present. World art will be integrated into the content. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to help students become more active, critical viewers of films and to be able to communicate that understanding in writing. Like written forms of literature, movies are texts that can be analyzed and interpreted. Students will view a number of films from different time periods, genres and artistic approaches. Lectures will concentrate on the narrative and stylistic elements used by film makers. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030 and the Humanities Area B General Education requirement.
This is a survey course designed to introduce students to the cinematic arts of a particular national cinema and to encourage them to think globally. Emphasis will be given to internationally recognized filmmakers of foreign cinemas and their recent new directors. Students will watch and analyze numerous films. They will study the aesthetics of film language as well as the social and cultural conditions that produce the cinema. The course will encourage student understanding of the intellectual, spiritual and moral issues that unite people despite differences in time, place, language and culture. Specific film content may vary from term to term. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030 and the Humanities Area B General Education requirement.
This course is a survey of the development of British literature from Anglo-Saxon times through the eighteenth century with attention to the historical background, the continuity of essential traditions and the characteristic temper of successive periods. Major emphasis is on the Old English, Middle English and Renaissance periods. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
British Literature II emphasizes the relevance of Romanticism, Victorianism and the first half of the twentieth century to contemporary thought. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to further student understanding of the concepts and applications of analytical and theoretical approaches to literature. Students will employ critical thinking in their interrogation of the texts. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course will explore trends and influences in literature from World War II to the present. Contemporary literature will be examined as a reflection of the philosophy of modern life and as a reflection of the student's world. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course will explore trends and influences in literature from World War II to the present. Contemporary literature will be examined as a reflection of the philosophy of modern life and as a reflection of the student's world. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to create an awareness of the ideas, techniques and historical relationships in world literature from the Enlightenment to the present. The Enlightenment, Romanticism, the 19th Century (Realism and Naturalism) and Modernism will be studied. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to create an awareness of the ideas, techniques and historical relationships in world literature from the Enlightenment to the present. The Enlightenment, Romanticism, the 19th Century (Realism and Naturalism) and Modernism will be studied. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course traces the historical origins, characteristics and stylistic developments of rock music from a musical and sociological perspective. This course is not recommended for music majors. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to introduce the student to primary forms and genres of blues and jazz music in both their historical and cultural context. Blues and jazz will be explored methodically as a distinctly American contribution to world music. The course will feature lecture and performance presentations by some of Florida's better known musicians and commentators. Literary and visual images of blues and jazz idioms will be incorporated into the course content. Assigned readings with active listening are an integral part of the course. The student will be introduced to Internet resources on the subject of blues and jazz themes. Students will be required to compose a journal with reactionary criticisms of blues and jazz guests and must complete a project that presents biographical and musical materials about a selected blues or jazz musician. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This course fulfills the Area B Humanities requirement.
Open to all students, this course is designed for the musical layman and is a survey course devoted to music in world civilization. Included is a study of the music relating to the background of the life and other arts of the times. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course is designed for the musical layman and is a survey course devoted to music in world civilization. Included is a study of the music relating to the background of the life and other arts of the times. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for A.A. degree-seeking students. Honors level content. Permission from Honors Director required.
This course is an introduction to music literature, history and culture for music majors. Topics to be addressed include an overview of musical repertories and cultures from the western art music tradition, American jazz and a selected case study of non-western music from a variety of musical traditions and historical periods, including from the western middle ages and north India. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course will explore the dramatic form and structure of a play. Students will read and analyze the script in order to study the playwright's intentions, methods and meanings. The script will be examined as a blueprint for production and performance. This course partially fulfills the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course surveys the art of theatre. Students will learn about the process of creating theatre through study of the production process and the many artists who participate in the creation of theatre. Through videos and attendance at live theatre, students will also learn the various forms of theatre, such as tragedy and comedy and various modes of presentation, both presentational and representational. Students will also be introduced to theatre's historic roots and its diversity as expressed in various cultures throughout the globe. This course contains a reading and writing component. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B. E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course investigates the foundational African American presence in U.S. theatre. Through dramatic literature and theories of racial construction, the course will explore the historical, cultural and socio-political underpinnings of this theatre as an artistic form in American culture.
This is a course in precalculus algebra intended for the student who is planning to take trigonometry and the calculus sequence. Major topics include rational and other algebraic functions and their graphs, piecewise-defined functions, a review of exponential and logarithmic functions, conic sections, matrices and determinants, sequences and series, Mathematical Induction, the Binomial Theorem and applications. The use of graphing calculators will be incorporated throughout the course. This course may be taken concurrently with MAC 1114, Trigonometry.
This is a course in precalculus algebra and trigonometry intended for the student who is planning to take the calculus sequence. This course condenses into a five-credit hour format all topics of Precalculus Algebra (MAC 1140) and Trigonometry (MAC 1114). Algebra topics include the following: polynomial, rational and other algebraic functions and their graphs, piecewise-defined functions, a review of exponential and logarithmic functions, conic sections, matrices and determinants, sequences and series, Mathematical Induction, the Binomial Theorem and applications. Trigonometry topics include angular measure, right triangle and unit circle trigonometry, trigonometric (circular) and inverse trigonometric functions and their graphs, trigonometric identities, conditional trigonometric equations, solution of right and oblique triangles, vectors, complex numbers in trigonometric form, applications, polar coordinates and graphs and parametric equations and graphs. The use of graphing calculators will be incorporated throughout the course. Successful completion of a high school course containing trigonometric topics and/or concepts is recommended.
This course is a study of Differential and Integral Calculus of algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions with applications to business analysis. It is designed to provide the student of business and social sciences a course in applied calculus. This course is not intended for the student who is required to complete the calculus series.
This is a first course in analytic geometry and the theory and application of calculus. Selected topics include a review of functions, limits and continuity, the derivative, differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions and their inverses, the Mean Value and Intermediate Value Theorems, extrema and graph sketching, area and the definite integral, anti-differentiation and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and integration of transcendental functions and their inverses. A graphing calculator will be used throughout the course. Students should ask the instructor which calculator will be used. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This is a first course in analytic geometry and the theory and application of calculus. Selected topics include a review of functions, limits and continuity, the derivative, differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions and their inverses, the Mean Value and Intermediate Value Theorems, extrema and graph sketching, area and the definite integral, anti-differentiation and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and integration of transcendental functions and their inverses. The graphing calculator will be used throughout the course. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course is a continuation of MAC 2311. Selected topics include conics, translation and rotation of axes, techniques of integration, arc length and other applications of the definite integral, polar coordinates, indeterminate forms and improper integrals, infinite sequences and series and Taylor's Formula. A graphing calculator will be used throughout the course. Students should ask the instructor which calculator will be used.
The following topics will be covered in this course: sets and Venn diagrams, logic, inductive and deductive reasoning, counting principles, permutations and combinations, probability, descriptive statistics and geometry. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course provides an opportunity for students to see mathematics used in ways not seen in traditional mathematics courses. Topics are selected from the following: financial mathematics, numbers and number systems, elementary number theory and graph theory. Additional topics may be included at the discretion of the instructor. History of mathematics, critical thinking skills, problem-solving techniques and the appropriate use of technology will be used throughout the course. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course introduces descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, two-sample inferences, correlation and regression and nonparametric tests. This course is a first course in statistical methods for those students entering a science or business-related field. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This Honors course introduces descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, two-sample inferences, correlation and regression and nonparametric tests. This course is a first course in statistical methods and involves Honors students in projects and development of portfolios. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course is intended to familiarize students with the basic biology of yeast and fungi that are of medical importance. A survey of common mycotic infections and mycotoxicosis is presented. It includes basic hands-on laboratory exercises involving the microscopic examination of samples and isolates, collecting samples for culturing yeast and fungi, preparation, inoculation and incubation of media, identification of yeast and fungal morphotypes (both microscopic and on culture media) using dichotomous or pictographic schemes, field studies and laboratory experimentations.
This course is a study of the characteristics of living organisms. Unifying concepts such as metabolism, genetics, evolution and cellular organization will be investigated. Designed for non-science majors, this course does not fulfill the credit requirements for biology majors (see BSC 2010C). This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course is a study of the characteristics of living organisms with emphasis on man. Unifying concepts such as metabolism, energy utilization and reproduction will be investigated. Laboratory exercises will emphasize basic principles of biology. Designed for non-science majors, this course does not fulfill the credit requirements for biology majors. Lab fee required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course is a study of the characteristics of living organisms. Unifying concepts such as metabolism, genetics, evolution and cellular organization will be investigated. Designed for non-science majors, this course does not fulfill the credit requirements for biology majors (see BSC 2010C). Honors level content. Permission from Honors Director required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science Requirement for A.A. degree-seeking students.
This course provides an introduction to scientific inquiry in relationship to the human body, its systems and basic functions with emphasis on homeostatic mechanisms. The structure and function of cells, tissues and organ systems will be investigated. Designed for non-science majors. This course does not fulfill the credit requirements for Biology majors.
This course is a study of interactions between living things and their biotic and abiotic environments with emphasis on the influence of humankind on natural systems and built environments. Designed for non-science majors, this course does not fulfill the credit requirements for biology majors.
This course is a study of plant and animal interactions in their natural environment and the influence of man on these natural systems. Active learning components may include outdoor activities and/or field trips. Designed for non-majors. Honors level content. Permission of the Honors director is required.
This course is a primer to prepare students to succeed in a biology or anatomy and physiology courses. The course focuses on developing and improving study skills and emphasizes personal accountability. Course content includes a review of basic math, biology, chemistry and cells and introduces anatomical terminology and body basics. This course cannot be used as a substitute for BSC 2010C.
Anatomy and Physiology I - Transfer
Students will be introduced to the most common lifestyle on earth: parasitism! This course will be a broad survey of parasites of humans, domestic and wild animals. Major topics will include ecological and evolutionary aspects of parasite-host interactions with an emphasis on life cycles, anatomy and physiology of parasites and immunological, pathological and clinical responses of hosts to parasitic infection. The treatment and control of parasites will also be discussed.
This course is primarily for science majors or students with a strong biology background. It is a study of the molecular and cellular composition and function of living organisms. Emphasis will be given to structure, chemical metabolism and genetic mechanisms. Laboratory illustrates basic biological principles. Lab fee required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course is a survey of the elementary aspects of the astronomical universe. Topics include the history and growth of astronomy, instrumentation, solar system, stars, galaxies and cosmology. Star-gazing sessions and planetarium trips are included to identify the prominent constellations and stars. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course is a survey of the elementary aspects of the astronomical universe. Topics include the history and growth of astronomy, instrumentation, solar system, stars, galaxies and cosmology. Star-gazing sessions and planetarium trips are included to identify the prominent constellations and stars. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course will introduce students to the Earth as a complex and dynamic system. Focus will be on the solid Earth, the oceans, the atmosphere and interactions among these subsystems. Students will learn of the Earth's origin and place within the solar system. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree-seeking students.
This is a three-credit-hour General Education course with no prerequisites. Students will study the impact of human systems on the physical and biological environment as well as discuss possible solutions to today's environmental problems. Topics include ecology, natural resources, energy, pollution, population growth, urbanization and sustainability. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This is a three-credit hour General Education course. Students will study the impact of human systems on the physical and biological environment as well as discuss possible solutions to today's environmental problems. Topics include ecology, natural resources, energy, pollution, population growth, urbanization and sustainability. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This beginning course is designed to give the student a basic understanding of Earth. Emphasis is on Earth materials, geologic hazards, the water cycle and plate tectonics. This course satisfies a natural science requirement and provides background knowledge for further courses in Earth sciences.
This course provides an introduction to the fossil record of life on Earth. Focus will be on modes of preservation, identification of fossil material, evolution and the fossil record of invertebrate and vertebrate animals. A field trip may be required.
This course provides a survey of introductory ideas in physical geology, including Earth materials, geologic hazards, plate tectonics, the water cycle and surficial landforms. Laboratory work will consist of identification of minerals and rock specimens, interpretation of stratigraphic units and work with topographic, physiographic and geologic maps and imagery. Field trips may be required. Lab fee required.
This beginning course is designed to acquaint the student with the elementary physical, chemical, biological and geological characteristics of the world ocean system. Emphasis is on Florida and its unique relationship with the ocean environment.
This beginning course is designed to acquaint the student with the oceans, Earth's most dominant feature and their importance to all planetary systems. Focus will be on their physical, chemical, biological and geological characteristics. Emphasis is on Florida and its unique relationship with the ocean environment. Field trips may be included.
This honors level introductory course is designed to acquaint students with the oceans, Earth's most dominant feature and their importance to all planetary systems. Focus will be on their physical, chemical, biological and geological characteristics. Emphasis is on Florida and its unique relationship with the ocean environment. Field trips may be included. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director.
This beginning course is designed to acquaint students with the elementary characteristics of the atmosphere. Students with an interest in aviation would especially benefit from many units taught in the course. Units include a study of atmospheric structure, heat budget, winds, air pollution, local and regional weather forecasting and more. Weather products are downloaded from the Internet and used throughout the course. Optional field trips included.
This beginning course is designed to acquaint students with the elementary characteristics of the atmosphere. Students with an interest in aviation would especially benefit from many units taught in the course. Units include a study of atmospheric structure, heat budget, winds, air pollution, local and regional weather forecasting and more. Weather products are downloaded from the Internet and used throughout the course. Laboratory work will focus on the extracting of information from online weather resources and the use of other weather-related tools. Optional field trips included. Lab fee required.
This is a one-semester course for the non-science major designed to meet the General Education requirement for the A.A. degree. Presumes no chemistry or mathematics background. Basic chemical principles are covered and related to larger topics that may include the chemistry of water and the atmosphere, energy sources, natural and man-made materials and environmental issues. Laboratory exercises during the lecture may be used to complement course material. Lab fee required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This is a one-semester course for the non-science major designed to meet the General Education requirement for the A.A. degree. Presumes no chemistry or mathematics background. Basic chemical principles are covered and related to larger topics that may include the chemistry of water and the atmosphere, energy sources, natural and man-made materials and environmental issues. Laboratory experiments are chosen that support these topics. Lab fee required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This is a one-semester course for the non-science major designed to meet the General Education requirement for the A.A. degree. Presumes no chemistry or mathematics background. Basic chemical principles are covered and related to larger topics that may include the chemistry of water and the atmosphere, energy sources, natural and man-made materials and environmental issues. Laboratory exercises during the lecture may be used to complement course material. Lab fee required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This is a one-semester course designed to introduce the principles of chemistry to nursing and allied health students. It assumes no prior chemistry background. The course can also be used as a preparation for CHM 2045C. Topics will span general, organic and biological chemistry and cover problem-solving, atomic and molecular structure, chemical reactions, bonding, gas laws, radioactivity, an introduction to organic chemistry, carbohydrates, acids/bases and other selected topics. Lab fee required.
This course serves as the first semester of the two-semester general chemistry sequence. Topics covered include problem-solving, atomic and molecular structure, chemical formulas and nomenclature, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, bonding models, gas laws, solutions and other selected topics. Laboratory experiments are chosen that support these topics. Lab fee required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course serves as the first semester of the two-semester general chemistry sequence. Topics covered include problem-solving, atomic and molecular structure, chemical formulas and nomenclature, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, bonding models, gas laws, solutions and other selected topics. Laboratory experiments are chosen that support these topics. Lab fee required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course is for non-science majors. Fundamental concepts of physics with application of everyday experiences are covered. Topics include kinematics, mechanics, electricity and magnetism and special topics. This course is designed to give the student a working knowledge of the physical factors in our environment. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course contains a descriptive and quantitative study of kinematics, mechanics, energy and applications of mechanics. This course meets the requirements for professional and technical students needing an algebra-based physics course. Lab fee required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This physics course is designed for science, engineering and mathematics majors. Topics studied are kinematics, mechanics and applications of mechanics. Lab fee required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This honors physics course is designed for science, engineering and mathematics majors. Topics studied are kinematics, mechanics and applications of mechanics. Lab is included. Lab fee required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course is an overview of local, regional and global sustainability with the goal of helping students recognize and engage with the interplay between environmental, socio-cultural and economic forces that affect our ability to achieve sustainability. Topics will include the science of climate change, pollution, environmental ethics and politics, renewable energy and sustainability in the built environment.
This course covers the study of man. It is an introductory course covering the economic, cultural, social and political development and technology of primitive societies. Attitudes, approach to problems and the general way of life of primitive societies are compared with modern societies. The course also provides a brief introduction to the development of fossil man and archaeology. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course will explore the nature, characteristics and content of culture from an anthropological perspective by examining the economy, art, religion, politics, language and kinship patterns of individual human societies. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Credit for this course is also awarded to entering students with appropriate scores on the International Baccalaureate (IB) examination in Social Anthropology.
The nature of economics, production, distribution and price determination will be explored. Emphasis will be placed on practical application and policy determination. Current problems will be surveyed. The course is designed for non-business majors. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This is an introductory course covering the nature, scope and methods of economics, economic concepts and economic institutions. Emphasis is placed upon production, consumption, determination of prices, distribution of income, fiscal policy, national income determinants, money and banking and comparative economic systems. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for AA degree seeking students.
This is an introductory course covering the nature, scope and method of economics, economic concepts and institutions. Emphasis is placed upon production, consumption, determination of prices, distribution of income, fiscal policy, national income determinants, money and banking and comparative economic systems. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for AA degree seeking students.
This course deals primarily with economic problems. Emphasis is given to markets, production functions, economic role of government, agricultural problems, labor-management relations, imperfect competition, interest and capital, economic security, international trade and finance and economic development. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course deals primarily with economic problems. Emphasis is given to markets, production functions, economic role of government, agricultural problems, labor-management relations, imperfect competition, interest and capital, economic security, international trade and finance and economic development. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
In this course, topics of current interest are presented in group instruction. This course may be taken four times for credit. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is an introductory study of the human and natural resources of the major regions of the world. From each region, one or more countries are selected for study in depth. Political, cultural, economic and strategic comparisons are made. The current role of the United States in the areas studied receives particular attention. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is a systematic study of the physical elements of the Earth, including their interrelationships and importance to man and his activities. Basic explanations of physical features of the Earth, their form and origin, principles of weather, world climactic patterns, world vegetation patterns and the study of soil properties and classification into the great soil groups of the world are covered. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course examines the political dimensions of Islam within a regional and global context. The course will analyze the foundation of Islamic thought in society, the nature of the relationship between religious and political establishments, the roots of instability and conflict in the Middle East, and the problems generated by the conceptualization of the West vs. the "rest."
This course is an introduction to major issues and theories of world politics. Topics include state and non-state actors, the nature of power, causes of war and peace, terrorism, international organizations, finance and trade, economic development, globalization, human rights and environmental concerns. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is an introduction to major issues and theories of world politics. Topics include state and non-state actors, the nature of power, causes of war and peace, terrorism, international organizations, finance and trade, economic development, globalization, human rights and environmental concerns. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course will explore the dynamics from a variety of frames. The course will provide a cursory overview of various issues such as conflict, violence, war, non-violence and peace. The course is intended to engage students in the theory and application addressing conflict, violence, war and terrorism. Students will examine approaches to peace, alternatives to war and to peace-building through peace studies and non-violence movements. The course will adopt the frame that we must review actions of the past in order to prevent recurrences. The student will draw upon the ideology of individuals identified as great peacemakers. While exploring great peacemakers, a focus on personal non-violence, ethical approaches to war, conflict transformation or peace and movements for social change will be conducted. Students will investigate local and international conflict, social movements and non-violent approaches to peace. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
In this course basic aspects of the federal government are studied. Emphasis is placed upon content and interpretation of the Constitution, Federalism, the Congress, the Presidency, the federal court system and the citizen's connection to the federal government by means of elections, political parties, interest groups and public opinion. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for A.A. degree seeking students and the Florida state civic literacy requirement per Florida Statues Section 1007.25 for all students.
In this course, basic aspects of the federal government are studied. Emphasis is placed upon content and interpretation of the Constitution, Federalism, the Congress, the Presidency, the federal court system and the citizen's connection to the federal government by means of elections, political parties, interest groups and public opinion. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for A.A. degree seeking students and the Florida state civic literacy requirement per Florida Statues Section 1007.25 for all students.
In this course, functions of state, county and city governments are studied. Emphasis is placed upon constitutions, political parties, politics, legislatures, courts, chief executives and interrelationships between federal and state governments and metropolitan problems. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
The basic principles of political thought are studied in this course. Students will examine the state and the relationship between the individual and the state. Topics such as authority, consent, obligation, freedom, order, equality, justice and democracy.
The basic principles of political thought are studied in this course. Students will examine the state and the relationship between the individual and the state. Topics such as authority, consent, freedom and obligation are examined. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course includes a comparative survey of the social, political, economic and historical tenets and developments of contemporary political ideologies. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course will expose the student to various policies and environmental regulations concerning air quality and dependence on foreign energy sources. Discussion will include enactment of policies, laws, regulations and programs with regard to conventional and alternative energy sources. Assessment of concerns over future depletion of global oil supplies and the impact to the U.S. economy will be discussed. The federal, state or local governmental response to issues concerning pollution and its impact on the number of environmental laws, the effectiveness of any proposed initiative and the extent of implementation and enforcement will be explored.
This is an introduction to the basic principles of associative learning. The primary focus of the course is on how organisms learn about their relationships that occur in the environment. This will be achieved through studying the phenomena of classical and operant conditioning in animals and humans. Specific techniques for understanding behavior are presented. Honors level content. Permission required from the Honors Director.
This course will examine the clinical description and etiology of psychological disorders from an integrative perspective. Emphasis will be placed on theories of causation and current research on treatment modalities. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course explores the effects of genetic, psychological, maturational and social factors at various stages during the lifespan. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Some sections of DEP 2004 have service-learning components. Please refer to class notes in schedule of classes for details.
This course applies psychological principles to individual and group functioning in organizational settings. Major topics include employee selection, motivation, job satisfaction, leadership and performance evaluation. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course explores the major theoretical perspectives to personality theory, including psychodynamic, trait, biological, humanistic, behavioral and cognitive systems. The course will also evaluate practical applications for the areas of counseling, business, education, vocational skills and personal growth. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This is an introductory course which surveys the field of psychology and basic principles and concepts utilized to understand human behavior. The major areas of study include development, learning, perception, motivation, emotions, personality, abnormal behavior, psychotherapy and testing measurements. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Some sections of PSY 2012 have service-learning components. Please refer to class notes in schedule of classes for details. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for AA degree seeking students.
This is an introductory psychology course with an Honors designation. It intends to survey the field of psychology and the basic principles and concepts utilized to understand major behavior. The major areas of study include methodology, statistics and a research literature survey as well as the major areas of the field of psychology. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for AA degree seeking students.
This course will examine influential experiments conducted in psychology over the last 100 years. These landmark studies have influenced and, at times, changed psychological principles and ethical standards. Major studies are in the areas of biopsychology, learning, memory, development, emotion, motivation, personality, psychopathology, therapies and social psychology. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is an introductory survey of sociology covering its scope, methods and general principles. Topics emphasized include group behavior, race relations, population, social institutions, social change and social stratification. The purpose of the course is to assist the student in acquiring an understanding of society. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course is an introductory survey of sociology covering its scope, methods and general principles. Topics emphasized include group behavior, race relations, population, social institutions, social change and social stratification. The purpose of the course is to assist the student in acquiring an understanding of society. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Note: This course contains Honors level material. Acceptance into the Honors Program or Permission from the Honors Director required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course is an in-depth analysis into the scope and causes of major problem areas from the perspective of both the individual and the community. Consideration will be given to various possible remedial approaches to each problem area. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is applied sociology that will pursue a unique, original research project each semester. It provides students with an in-depth understanding of social scientific research through experimental investigation. Utilizing the research project as a point of focus, this course includes training in all aspects of empirical research, including literature review, methodology, data collection, data coding, data analysis and presentation of results. Previous coursework in sociology or psychology is recommended. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director.
This course is designed to study the changing culture of our nation. Issues of race, ethnicity, gender, class, nationality and globalism will be explored. This course is also designed to provide information and strategies for living and working in a pluralistic, multi-cultural society. Values and ethics of diversity and commonality will be emphasized. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course will explore the dynamics of conflict from a variety of frames. Students will be provided with valuable insight about conflict that will help lead to an understanding regarding the conflicts they are likely to face in life, at school or work, in society as well as those they observe in national headlines. An introduction to the dispute resolution practices of mediation, facilitation and negotiation will be conducted. The examination of how one's gender and cultural perspective may influence the approach and outcome of the conflict will be discussed. Current trends and issues within the field of conflict management and resolution will be reviewed. The course will engage students in the theory and application of addressing conflict management and resolution on an individual, interpersonal and international perspective. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to present students with an interdisciplinary study of the sexual functioning of humans. Course information is drawn liberally from the disciplines of sociology, psychology and biology, providing students with an integrated introduction to the study of human sexual behavior. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is a historical and comparative study of courtship, mate selection, engagement, marriage, husband-wife relationships and child-rearing in the United States. Emphasis is placed upon the changing contemporary family with respect to social and economic status, sex, sources of marital conflict and social values. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course will examine normative deviance through the sociological lens. It will focus on the social context, behaviors and societal reactions associated with deviance. Criminal and noncriminal forms of deviance will be investigated using a variety of theoretical perspectives. In approaching deviance sociologically, this course will highlight the social constructions of deviance and the influence of social control and stigmatization as reactions to deviant behavior. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
Total Credits: 64

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Tuition and Fee Comparison*

 Seminole StateUFFSUUCF
Tuition and Fees$3,131$6,380$6,538$6,379
Room and Board-0-$10,590$11,088$10,300
Books and Supplies$1,000$890$1,000$1,200
Total$4,131$17,860$18,626$17,879

For more information on Seminole State's tuition and fees, please see the 2020-21 fee schedule.

* Tuition costs are based on Fall 2020 and Spring 2021 terms, with 15 credit hours per term for in-state students. Dorm fees, meal plans and book expenses are estimates based on information provided on each university's website. Lab fees and other fees that may be assessed at the time of registration may be viewed in the College fee schedule. As Seminole State is a commuter college with no residence halls on its campuses, costs for room and board are not calculated.

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