Engineering Technology Bachelor of Science

Earn your four-year degree here at Seminole State, and get started designing the infrastructure and systems of tomorrow. As part of our program, you’ll benefit from expertly developed courses, award-winning facilities and standards of excellence set by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology. Plus, as in real-life engineering, our program features frequent hands-on experiences with community projects and personal support from the area’s design and construction leaders.

Getting Started: Summer B Session

April 15:   Financial Aid


June 13:   Application


June 20:   Classes Begin

Other Important Dates »

Why Seminole State?

  • Outstanding reputation: Seminole State has been developing programs for the built environment for more than 20 years. 
  • Professional curriculum: The curriculum is based on the model set by ABET, the professional benchmark since 1937.
  • Dedicated faculty: Faculty are professionally licensed with real-world and classroom expertise. 
  • Industry involvement: The program is industry-focused and supported by the region’s design and construction leaders.
  • Hands-on experience: Apply your knowledge to real-world situations through co-ops and internships with industry partners, and participate in active construction site visits and community projects.

Engineering Technology Bachelor of Science
Type: BS
Major Code : AET-BS
CIP: 1101501011

Program Description

The Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Engineering Technology program emphasizes the application of existing scientific and engineering techniques to solve real-world problems found in engineering settings. The program develops the student's knowledge and skills to plan, design, inspect, construct/fabricate, operate, and maintain engineering systems, infrastructure and buildings.

Profession

Engineering Technology is one of the most exciting technical careers. Employment and job opportunities are strong. The business world needs people who can solve problems and get things done. This matches perfectly with Engineering Technology. Technologists apply engineering and scientific knowledge with technical skills to support engineering activities. They typically concentrate their activities on applied design, using current engineering practice. Technologists play key roles on the engineering team: they are involved in product development, manufacturing, product assurance, sales and program management. They typically pursue careers in such areas as engineering production and design, building systems design, surveying, GIS, civil and site development, mechatronics and robotics, alternative energy, green and sustainable design, and engineering/project management. For students who are problem-solvers and who have a “can do” spirit, Engineering Technology is a great choice.

.

Career Opportunities

  • Civil, Site & Surveying Engineering Technologist
  • Mechatronics & Robotics Engineering Technologist
  • Engineering & Technology Program Management
  • Sustainable Engineering Technologist
  • Design, Modeling & Simulation Engineering Technologist
  • Industrial & Manufacturing Manager
  • Operations & Maintenance Manager

For career information related to this program, please visit O*Net OnLine.

Job Outlook

Employment of engineering technologists is projected to grow 15 percent from 2012 to 2022, faster than the average for all occupations. The median annual wage for engineering technologists was $80,890 in May 2012 (Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics). Per Forbes, A Bachelor of Science in Engineering Technology is ranked as the eighth highest paying degree for college graduates.

Program Admission

Applicants seeking admission to Seminole State College's bachelor's degree programs must comply with the College's General Admissions procedures. In addition, students must meet the following program-specific requirements listed below prior to being accepted into upper-division coursework:

  • Completion of Associate in Arts (A.A.) or bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited institution or completion of selected Associate in Science (A.S.) degrees in related areas from any regionally accredited Florida institution:
    • A.S., Architectural Design and Construction Technology (CIP 1615010100)
    • A.S., Architectural Design and Drafting Technology (CIP 1615010100)
    • A.S., Civil Engineering (CIP 1715020101)
    • A.S., Electronics Engineering Technology (CIP 1615000001)
    • A.S., Engineering Technology (CIP1615030301)
    • A.S., Environmental Science Technology (CIP 1715059901)
    • A.S., Industrial Management Technology (CIP 1606200101)
    • A.S., Manufacturing Technology (CIP 1615060302)
    • A.S., Naval Architecture and Yacht Design (CIP 1614220100)
    • A.S., Safety Engineering Technology (CIP 1615070101)
    • A.S., Technology Project Management (CIP 1506120107)
  • 60-plus credit hours from a regionally accredited institution with at least 18 credit hours in Engineering or Engineering Technology satisfies requirements for admissions into the program.

    All other degrees will be evaluated by the faculty committee on a case-by-case basis.

  • A GPA of 2.0 or higher.
  • Program Progression Requirements: once admitted, students must achieve (or have achieved) a grade of "C" or higher in the following courses:
    • Civil, Site & Surveying and Production & Design Specializations:
      • ARC 1301 Architectural Design I
      • BCN 2230 Construction Materials and Methods
      • ETD 1340C Computer-Aided Design II
      • SUR 2101C Surveying
    • Mechatronics & Robotics Specialization:
      • ETI 1420C Materials & Processes for Engineering Tech
      • ETI 1843C Motors and Controls
      • ETM 1010C Mechanical Measurement & Instrumentation
      • ETM 2315C Hydraulic and Pneumatic Systems
    • Engineering & Project Managment and Sustainable Engineering Specializations (choose one group):
      • ARC 1301 Architectural Design I
      • BCN 2230 Construction Materials and Methods
      • ETD 1340C Computer-Aided Design II
      • SUR 2101C Surveying

        Or

      • ETI 1420C Materials & Processes for Engineering Tech.
      • ETI 1843C Motors and Controls
      • ETM 1010C Mechanical Measurement & Instrumentation
      • ETM 2315C Hydraulic and Pneumatic Systems
    • All Specializations
      • MAC 2233 Concepts of Calculus OR MAC 2311 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I
      • PHY 1053C Physics I or higher
      • STA 2023 Statistical Methods OR MAC 2312 Analytic Geometry w/ Calculus II
View program admission, career opportunities and more.......
Available Courses
Required Courses
39
This course covers the basic concepts of computer programming. Students use a structured approach using the Java programming language to design and program logic techniques such as iteration, initialization, conditional processing, accumulation and sequencing. Also considered are programming style and program efficiency. Logic techniques and data formats are illustrated using high level programming languages. This class utilizes classroom lecture and hands-on programming exercises. A working knowledge of the Windows PC including starting programs, saving files and copying files is required. Lab fee required.
This is an introductory course in basic electricity intended for the engineering technology programs. It consists of the concepts, laws and definitions encountered in AC and DC electric circuits.
This course will introduce the student to the role of the engineer as a creative design professional. Emphasis will be on understanding the creative process and the factors that influence it. The student will participate in engineering orientation and make case studies of selected engineering fields.
This course is an introduction to the techniques of drawing for three-dimensional spatial relationships, visualization, sketching and graphical presentation. Engineering drawing, descriptive geometry and graphical solution techniques using both manual and computer methods will be emphasized. Lab fee required.
This course is an introduction to computer software applications involving engineering spreadsheets (Excel) and symbolic processing (MATLAB) in order to solve a variety of engineering-related problems.
The purpose of this course is to help drafting students develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes required to work at an entry-level job in such positions as CAD technician trainee, CAD system operator or CAD technician. This course is designed for students who have already received in-depth training in one or more application areas. Lab fee required.
This course is an introduction to the new designing techniques and capabilities of solid modeling using the SolidWorks software. Topics include the integration and application of parametric solid modeling drawing within SolidWorks. Lab fee required.
This course will prepare the student for the field of Engineering Technology and/or related sciences. The course will focus on specialized practical knowledge related to the mathematical, scientific or technical aspects of mathematics, science and engineering. Fundamental principles of statics, co-planar and non-co-planar force systems including concurrent and non-concurrent forces will be covered. Additional focus will be placed on both friction and non-friction systems. Stress and strain evaluations on columns, beams, trusses and foundation systems will also be addressed.
Note: ETG 2502 must be completed with a grade of "C" or higher.
This course will continue to prepare the student for the field of engineering technology and/or a related science. The course will focus on specialized, practical knowledge related to more advanced mathematical, scientific or technical aspects of mathematics, science and engineering. Relationships between external forces and action of members of a structure will be covered. Topics include stress, shear, moment, deflections, column and beam connections and Mohr's Circle.
In this course, the student will use everything previously learned in the program to plan a related engineering problem or project. The student will be responsible for planning the basic design, material selection, structural analysis and related calculations, etc. Project must be approved by faculty advisor. The student will produce a formal oral presentation. This course must be completed with a grade of "C" or higher.
This course provides the student with the skills to formulate, develop and apply analytical techniques to reach cost-effective solutions to business, government and/or engineering-related problems. The course will focus on time-based analysis of selection, replacement, lease-to-buy options, multiple alternatives, uncertainty and sensitivity analysis. A problem-solving approach will be implemented to develop the concepts identified. Topics include engineering, decision-making, cash flow equivalence, present worth analysis, annual cash flow analysis, rate of return analysis, incremental analysis, depreciation, income tax assessment, replacement analysis, inflation and deflation, estimating in future event, selecting a minimum attractive rate of return and the successful evaluation and rationing of capital among competing projects.
This course provides an introduction to applied thermodynamics and fluid mechanics. Thermodynamic topics include pressure, temperature, heat and heat transfer, properties of substances, First & Second Law of Thermodynamics and analysis of power. Fluid dynamic topics include fluid statics and the basic laws of fluid flow, conservation of mass, momentum and energy, applications of the basic laws to pipe flow, hydraulic and pneumatic processes.
This course covers the introduction to the theory and practice of managing formal organizations, including planning, organization theory, human behavior and control.
This course involves the practical uses of applied mathematics in the areas of engineering technology, design and construction. Trigonometric functions are covered as well as law of sines, law of cosines and basic vector mechanics.

or

This course is a calculus preparatory course in trigonometry with emphasis upon functions. The topics include angular measure, right triangle and unit circle trigonometry, trigonometric (circular) and inverse trigonometric functions and their graphs, trigonometric identities, conditional trigonometric equations, solution of right and oblique triangles, vectors, complex numbers in trigonometric form, applications, polar coordinates and graphs and parametric equations and graphs. The use of graphing calculators will be incorporated throughout the course.
Elective Courses
18

Elective Credits

18
Credits
Engineering Technology Specializations
34

Choose 34 credits from any of the following specializations:

  • Civil, Site and Surveying
  • Production and Design
  • Engineering and Project Management
  • Mechatronics and Robotics
  • Sustainable Engineering

Civil, Site and Surveying Specialization

34

Required Specialization Courses

13
Credits
This course introduces the student to the basic concepts of architectural design, including aspects and determinants of form and space. Drafting skills and the concepts of graphic communication are introduced and developed. Lab fee required.
This course offers useful knowledge of the materials and methods of building construction. Students are introduced to building science, materials science, legal constraints and building craft. Building techniques are presented as whole working systems from site work through roofing. This course will present the basic construction systems, each in sufficient detail, so that the student is brought to an operational level of knowledge.
In this course, students will learn advanced two- and three-dimensional drafting techniques. Menu and program modification will be emphasized along with improved speed and accuracy. Lab fee required.
This course covers the theory and practice of surveying, use and care of instruments, instrument error, balancing and closing traverses, introduction to land and construction surveying. Lab fee required.

Specialization Electives

21
Credits
Students will learn advanced concepts for building systems associated with residential and commercial-type structures. Particular emphasis will be given to the H.V.A.C., mechanical, plumbing and electrical systems. Different types of systems in each discipline will be discussed. The student will be exposed to design processes and system selections for each building system used.
Principles and practices of residential and commercial land development processes will be discussed in this course. Students will learn zoning and land use requirements and/or restrictions. The course will expose the student to project development processes and the utilization criteria used. Financial requirements and responsibility of the project, feasibility studies, market analysis, site analysis and utilization, project programming and design will also be addressed in this course. Project cost estimates for infrastructure, common buildings, individual specialty buildings and/or houses will be identified and evaluated.
This course is an introduction to structural analysis. Designs of concrete, timber and steel members will be covered as well as current code and specification requirements.
This course presents site plan development, including contour revisions, grading, drainage, utilities and street and road layout. Pipe drawings, both flat and pictorial, utility and working drawings and extensive civil, three-dimensional applications will be included. Students will learn to plan, prepare and interpret engineering drawings. The student will learn the use of drafting equipment and computers to design and draft mechanical, architectural, civil, electrical, structural building systems and related areas.
This course is an instructional program that prepares individuals to apply mathematical and scientific principles to the delineation, determination, planning and positioning of land tracts, land and water boundaries, land contours and features and the preparation of related maps, charts and reports. Includes instruction in applied geodesy, computer graphics, photo interpretation, plane and geodetic surveying, mensuration, traversing, survey equipment operation and maintenance, instrument calibration and basic cartography.
This course covers the analysis of map properties and use of maps as sources of information, including the essentials of location, scale, projections, direction, elevation and general map elements. An introduction to map-making in geographic information systems is presented.

Choose 3 credits from any other BSET Specialization

3
Credits

Production and Design Specialization

34

Required Specialization Courses

13
Credits
This course introduces the student to the basic concepts of architectural design, including aspects and determinants of form and space. Drafting skills and the concepts of graphic communication are introduced and developed. Lab fee required.
This course offers useful knowledge of the materials and methods of building construction. Students are introduced to building science, materials science, legal constraints and building craft. Building techniques are presented as whole working systems from site work through roofing. This course will present the basic construction systems, each in sufficient detail, so that the student is brought to an operational level of knowledge.
In this course, students will learn advanced two- and three-dimensional drafting techniques. Menu and program modification will be emphasized along with improved speed and accuracy. Lab fee required.
This course covers the theory and practice of surveying, use and care of instruments, instrument error, balancing and closing traverses, introduction to land and construction surveying. Lab fee required.

Specialization Electives

21
Credits
This course explores a number of related computer graphics programs and how they can be combined to enhance construction communication and presentations. Illustration and drafting software will be introduced. 3D modeling software (Revit) is included.
This course is a three-dimensional CAD course which introduces the student to Autodesk Revit Software. The student learns to work with architectural computer models rather than the basic geometric drawing approach. The Revit platform for building information modeling is a complete design and documentation solution which supports all phases of design, drawing production and schedule development for a given project. This software allows the student to work in various views of the parametric building model at the same time.
This course is a three-dimensional CAD course which introduces the student to advanced concepts in Autodesk Revit Software. The student continues to learn how to draw and design in a three-dimensional architectural computer model format. Advanced concepts in three-dimensional modeling are introduced and implemented in class projects. This software allows the student to work in various views of the parametric building model at the same time. Each view may be opened separately and any changes that are made in one drawing are immediately updated in all other views. The Revit platform for building information modeling also allows the student to identify and produce a material list (automatically) for every item required for a particular design as the design develops and changes. This becomes an invaluable tool for the estimating and scheduling functions required by the contractor.
Students will learn advanced concepts for building systems associated with residential and commercial-type structures. Particular emphasis will be given to the H.V.A.C., mechanical, plumbing and electrical systems. Different types of systems in each discipline will be discussed. The student will be exposed to design processes and system selections for each building system used.
This course is an introduction to structural analysis. Designs of concrete, timber and steel members will be covered as well as current code and specification requirements.

Choose 6 credits from any other BSET Specialization

6
Credits

Engineering and Project Management Specialization

34

Required Specialization Courses

13
Credits

Choose Option A or B:

Option A

This course introduces the student to the basic concepts of architectural design, including aspects and determinants of form and space. Drafting skills and the concepts of graphic communication are introduced and developed. Lab fee required.
This course offers useful knowledge of the materials and methods of building construction. Students are introduced to building science, materials science, legal constraints and building craft. Building techniques are presented as whole working systems from site work through roofing. This course will present the basic construction systems, each in sufficient detail, so that the student is brought to an operational level of knowledge.
In this course, students will learn advanced two- and three-dimensional drafting techniques. Menu and program modification will be emphasized along with improved speed and accuracy. Lab fee required.
This course covers the theory and practice of surveying, use and care of instruments, instrument error, balancing and closing traverses, introduction to land and construction surveying. Lab fee required.

Option B

This course is an introduction to material characteristics and behavior. The student shall study the interrelationships of structure, property, performance and material selection. Use of engineering materials such as metals, ceramics, polymers, electronic materials and composites in engineering applications will be covered. The student shall be introduced to the concept of sustainable materials. Lab fee required.
This course explores the theory and application of AC and DC motors. It covers how different types of motors operate and how electronic motor control systems are designed and can be used to improve efficiency in a wide ranges of applications. Lab fee required.
This course provides the basic foundation for both mechanical and electronic measurement techniques. The course will integrate the concepts, principles and techniques of mechanical measurement with the use of various types of instruments, including micrometers, verniers, calipers, gauges and other types of measuring equipment. The course will also introduce the student to the basic measurement techniques employing electronic test equipment including the operation and usage of digital multimeters, function generators and oscilloscopes. Lab fee required.
This course provides the basic principles of electro-mechanical, hydraulic and pneumatic systems. It includes a practical approach to technical problems involving hydraulics and pneumatics, fluid mechanics, hydrostatic forces and pump operation, including the electrical circuitry needed to operate and control hydraulic/pneumatic systems. Lab fee required.

Specialization Electives

21
Credits
This course provides a review of the project management standards, including American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) standards (and its ten project management knowledge areas and five project processes) and other applicable standards. The course will also introduce the concept of Earned Value Management (EVM). All federal projects in excess of $50M must be managed using certified EVM management systems.
This course provides an overview of the theory and practice of managing projects within various organizational structures. The fundamental building blocks of project management are addressed with special emphasis on the triple constraint and developing project plans. Students will learn to develop appropriate project scope, schedule, budget and integrated baselines essential for proper project analysis and management. These topics are taken one at a time through a series of applied problems and then exercised through case studies.
Managing the human elements of project management is as challenging as mastering the technical aspects. Innovative approaches are employed to successfully motivate, communicate, negotiate and resolve conflicts among the team members and stakeholders. In this course, students develop an understanding of the individual, the group and the project team. Proven techniques to make conflict a constructive rather than a destructive experience are discovered. Students develop effective communication, negotiation and conflict resolution skills to successfully lead both domestic and global projects.
Quality management ensures that project deliverables meet pre-determined criteria. Methods for quality management are studied, including quality planning, assurance and control. Risk management is the systematic process of identifying, analyzing, evaluating and controlling project risks. Both qualitative and quantitative risk analyses are conducted and strategies for proactive risk aversion and reactive risk response are developed.

Choose 9 credits from any other BSET Specialization

9
Credits

Mechatronics and Robotics Specialization

34

Required Specialization Courses

13
Credits
This course is an introduction to material characteristics and behavior. The student shall study the interrelationships of structure, property, performance and material selection. Use of engineering materials such as metals, ceramics, polymers, electronic materials and composites in engineering applications will be covered. The student shall be introduced to the concept of sustainable materials. Lab fee required.
This course explores the theory and application of AC and DC motors. It covers how different types of motors operate and how electronic motor control systems are designed and can be used to improve efficiency in a wide ranges of applications. Lab fee required.
This course provides the basic foundation for both mechanical and electronic measurement techniques. The course will integrate the concepts, principles and techniques of mechanical measurement with the use of various types of instruments, including micrometers, verniers, calipers, gauges and other types of measuring equipment. The course will also introduce the student to the basic measurement techniques employing electronic test equipment including the operation and usage of digital multimeters, function generators and oscilloscopes. Lab fee required.
This course provides the basic principles of electro-mechanical, hydraulic and pneumatic systems. It includes a practical approach to technical problems involving hydraulics and pneumatics, fluid mechanics, hydrostatic forces and pump operation, including the electrical circuitry needed to operate and control hydraulic/pneumatic systems. Lab fee required.

Specialization Electives

21
Credits
This course provides an introduction to computer taxonomy, description languages, conventional computer architecture, microprogramming, instruction sets, I/O techniques, memory, survey of non-conventional architecture and software interfaces.
This course emphasizes the design and programming of microcontrollers. Students will be introduced to microcontroller architecture, use of programmable counter/timer arrays, analog interfaces, serial communications and other peripherals.
This course provides an introduction and overview of security issues for organizational and institutional computing. Physical, software and computing systems security will be discussed. Students will be required to perform introductory security analyses, write code to automate some security preparedness tasks and set up a protection scheme for a simple PC computer.
This course explores the concepts of object-oriented programming including abstraction, encapsulation, inheritance and polymorphism. The applications developed will focus on extracting objects from a problem domain and designing solutions based on passing messages between objects. Implementation will be done in a current object-oriented language.
This course applies basic mathematical logic skills and foundations used in computer science and information systems technology. It is designed for students in a major of IT or IST and includes logic rules, tautologies, Boolean algebra, set theory, mathematical induction and other topics of discrete computational analysis.
This course emphasizes advanced topics in robot programming, interfacing and designing for industrial and laboratory applications. Topics include a study of the history of robots, typical configurations, mechanisms, sensors, actuators and advanced control schemes with sensors and actuators for industrial applications.
This course emphasizes programming, interfacing and designing robotic work cells for industrial applications. A study of robot configurations and programming techniques will be investigated for applications found in assembly, inspection and material handling.

Sustainable Engineering Specialization

34

Required Specialization Courses

13
Credits

Choose Option A or B:

Option A

This course introduces the student to the basic concepts of architectural design, including aspects and determinants of form and space. Drafting skills and the concepts of graphic communication are introduced and developed. Lab fee required.
This course offers useful knowledge of the materials and methods of building construction. Students are introduced to building science, materials science, legal constraints and building craft. Building techniques are presented as whole working systems from site work through roofing. This course will present the basic construction systems, each in sufficient detail, so that the student is brought to an operational level of knowledge.
In this course, students will learn advanced two- and three-dimensional drafting techniques. Menu and program modification will be emphasized along with improved speed and accuracy. Lab fee required.
This course covers the theory and practice of surveying, use and care of instruments, instrument error, balancing and closing traverses, introduction to land and construction surveying. Lab fee required.

Option B

This course is an introduction to material characteristics and behavior. The student shall study the interrelationships of structure, property, performance and material selection. Use of engineering materials such as metals, ceramics, polymers, electronic materials and composites in engineering applications will be covered. The student shall be introduced to the concept of sustainable materials. Lab fee required.
This course explores the theory and application of AC and DC motors. It covers how different types of motors operate and how electronic motor control systems are designed and can be used to improve efficiency in a wide ranges of applications. Lab fee required.
This course provides the basic foundation for both mechanical and electronic measurement techniques. The course will integrate the concepts, principles and techniques of mechanical measurement with the use of various types of instruments, including micrometers, verniers, calipers, gauges and other types of measuring equipment. The course will also introduce the student to the basic measurement techniques employing electronic test equipment including the operation and usage of digital multimeters, function generators and oscilloscopes. Lab fee required.
This course provides the basic principles of electro-mechanical, hydraulic and pneumatic systems. It includes a practical approach to technical problems involving hydraulics and pneumatics, fluid mechanics, hydrostatic forces and pump operation, including the electrical circuitry needed to operate and control hydraulic/pneumatic systems. Lab fee required.

Specialization Electives

21
Credits
This course provides an overview of the theory and practice of managing projects within various organizational structures. The fundamental building blocks of project management are addressed with special emphasis on the triple constraint and developing project plans. Students will learn to develop appropriate project scope, schedule, budget and integrated baselines essential for proper project analysis and management. These topics are taken one at a time through a series of applied problems and then exercised through case studies.
This course covers the essential principles of sustainable forms of energy. Specific topics include the units of measure, analytical comparisons of energy types, calculating consumption and production values and exploring essential underlying formulas. Case studies will emphasize useful applications of existing sustainable energy sources.
This course will introduce the student to the principles and fundamental photovoltaic technology. Solar radiation, site survey and planning, solar components and configuration, batteries, PV panel construction, inverters and system sizing are some of the topics covered in depth in this course. This course will help the student develop knowledge of the complete photovoltaic system and the different configurations used in industry.
As the demand for energy grows worldwide, there has been an increased emphasis on utilization of non-conventional power sources. This course addresses and explores technological advances in alternative forms of energy. Characteristics of both conventional and emerging technologies such as nuclear, hydro-electric, solar, wind, geo-thermal, ocean energy, hydrogen and battery-electric will be explored. Students will be exposed to the obstacles of alternative energy development and technological challenges of their implementation such as cost, infrastructure and availability bases on geography. Pollution and global climate change will be discussed. Identification of major outdoor air pollutants, the scope of outdoor air pollution and the assessment of potential solutions will be emphasized.
This course will expose students to the impact of buildings on natural resources and the environment. Weekly lessons will cover sustainable rating systems, as well as modules in water efficiency, energy conservation measures, indoor environmental quality, and materials and resources. Sustainable best practices and standards will be emphasized.
This course is intended to provide an overview of concepts, tools and techniques necessary to build and operate a sustainable organization. Topics covered include the role of leadership in sustainability, organizational design issues, capital investment, costing and risk management systems, incentives and rewards, measurement of social, environmental and economic impacts, green marketing concepts and internal and external reporting.
This course will expose the student to various policies and environmental regulations concerning air quality and dependence on foreign energy sources. Discussion will include enactment of policies, laws, regulations and programs with regard to conventional and alternative energy sources. Assessment of concerns over future depletion of global oil supplies and the impact to the U.S. economy will be discussed. The federal, state or local governmental response to issues concerning pollution and its impact on the number of environmental laws, the effectiveness of any proposed initiative and the extent of implementation and enforcement will be explored.
General Education Courses
37

Communications General Education courses

9
Credits

History General Education course

3
Credits

Humanities General Education courses

6
Credits

Mathematics General Education Courses: Choose MAC 2233 or higher level Mathematics General Education course and STA 2023 or MAC 2311 and 2312 or higher level Mathematics General Education courses

6
This course is a study of Differential and Integral Calculus of algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions with applications to business analysis. It is designed to provide the student of business and social sciences a course in applied calculus. This course is not intended for the student who is required to complete the calculus series.
or higher level mathematics course
and
This course introduces descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, two-sample inferences, correlation and regression and nonparametric tests. This course is a first course in statistical methods for those students entering a science or business-related field. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
or
and
This is a first course in analytic geometry and the theory and application of calculus. Selected topics include a review of functions, limits and continuity, the derivative, differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions and their inverses, the Mean Value and Intermediate Value Theorems, extrema and graph sketching, area and the definite integral, anti-differentiation and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and integration of transcendental functions and their inverses. A graphing calculator will be used throughout the course. Students should ask the instructor which calculator will be used. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
or higher level mathematics course
This course is a continuation of MAC 2311. Selected topics include conics, translation and rotation of axes, techniques of integration, arc length and other applications of the definite integral, polar coordinates, indeterminate forms and improper integrals, infinite sequences and series and Taylor's Formula. A graphing calculator will be used throughout the course. Students should ask the instructor which calculator will be used.

Science General Education Courses

7
This course contains a descriptive and quantitative study of kinematics, mechanics, energy and applications of mechanics. This course meets the requirements for professional and technical students needing an algebra-based physics course. Lab fee required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
or higher level Physics course
and

Science General Education Course from Area A (Biological Science) or Area B (Earth Science)

Social Science General Education courses

6
Credits
Total Credits:
128
Note:

Students enrolled in Seminole State College’s baccalaureate degree programs must demonstrate foreign language proficiency. Students who have previously received a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution are exempt from this requirement.  Additionally, per Florida Statute 1007.25, “Beginning with students initially entering a Florida College System institution or state university in 2014-2015 and thereafter, coursework for an associate in arts degree shall include demonstration of competency in a foreign language.” 

Note:

Program Progression Requirements: once admitted, students must achieve (or have achieved) a grade of "C" or higher in the following courses: ARC 1301, BCN 2230, EGS 1111C, ETD 1320C, SUR 2101C, MAC 2233 or MAC 2311, STA 2023 or MAC 2312, PHY 1053C.

Note:

Students must meet General Education requirements. Students awarded an Associate in Arts or Baccalaureate degree or who have official transcripts documenting "General Education Requirements Met" from a Florida College System or Florida State University System degree-granting institution shall be considered to have satisfied Seminole State's General Education requirements. Please refer to this catalog's General Education section for specific requirements.

Note:

Honors in the Major is an indication that the student pursues academic excellence and exhibits leadership qualities. The Honors in the Major Program is designed to encourage the best juniors and seniors to do classwork and projects that expose them to the latest in technology and methodology. Refer to the Honors in the Major section of this catalog for details.

Textbook information will be available online for each term's courses 45 days prior to the first day of classes for the term.

Each course offered by Seminole State is listed alphabetically and organized by the course prefix, catalog number and description. The courses in this catalog are identified by prefixes and numbers that were assigned by Florida's Statewide Course Numbering System, a system used by all public postsecondary institutions in Florida and 32 non-public institutions. Seminole State controls the description, credit and content of its own courses.

Your tuition shouldn’t go against your intuition.

Your pursuit of higher education is admirable. So why struggle with high tuition in the process? Here we make life’s next steps affordable. Whether you’re seeking a university transfer (A.A.) degree, a four-year bachelor’s, an Associate in Science degree or even earning a technical certificate, you’ll find reasonable tuition and payment plans that make sense. And to us, that’s scholarly.

In fact, a full-time college education at Seminole State is more than $10,000 less each year than most state universities. 

Go For Less.

Tuition and Fee Comparison*

 Seminole State UFFSUUCF
Tuition and Fees$3,597$6,380$6,480$6,379
Room and Board-0-$10,120$10,666$10,010
Books and Supplies$1,000$1,030$1,000$1,030
Total$4,597$17,530$18,146$17,419.20

For more information on Seminole State's tuition and fees, please see the 2018-19 fee schedule.

* Tuition costs are based on Fall 2018 and Spring 2019 terms, with 15 credit hours per term for in-state students. Dorm fees, meal plans and book expenses are estimates based on information provided on each university's website. As Seminole State is a commuter college with no residence halls on its campuses, costs for room and board are not calculated.

The Profession

Engineering technology professionals assist engineers and architects in developing the heating, air conditioning and electrical systems of buildings. They use their expertise in math, physics and engineering to ensure that a building is sound and functional. Engineering graduates pursue highly paid careers in the construction industry and related areas.

Career Opportunities

Occupations benefiting from this degree are some of the fastest growing in Central Florida. During the next eight years, state figures project an average of 325 openings per year in the region.

A bachelor's degree in architectural engineering prepares you for these careers:

  • Architectural Engineering Technologist
  • Drafter
  • Drafting Manager
  • Engineering and Mapping Technician
  • Environmental Engineering Technician
  • Surveyor

Contact

Baccalaureate Office
407.708.2106 (call or text)
Bachelor's Admissions