Physical Therapist Assistant (PTA) Associate in Science

For Fall Term 2021, we are offering in-person, hybrid, remote and online courses.  
For more information, view class types

After an injury, a patient needs a skilled set of hands to help them recover. This is where you come in. Become trained in physical therapy, and learn the application of physical agents, massage, gait training and therapeutic exercises that help relieve pain and restore function.

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Getting Started: Fall Term 2021

June 14:  Financial Aid


Aug. 16:  Application


Aug. 23:  Classes Begin

Other Important Dates »

Why Seminole State?

  • Affordable tuition: Earn a state university education at about half the cost.
  • Small class sizes: With classes of 30 or less, you don’t have to learn in an auditorium.
  • Online degree option: Most courses for our A.S. degrees are offered in person and online, so you can study when and where you want. 
  • Seamless transitionMost A.S. graduates earn credits that can be applied to a bachelor's degree at Seminole State or at the University of Central Florida through DirectConnect™ to UCF.*
  • Job Placement: According to state data, most Seminole State A.S. programs have placement rates above 90 percent.

*A.S. students who are planning to transfer to bachelor's degree programs should meet with a counselor, advisor or specialist to make sure the required courses are taken and the entry requirements are met.

Physical Therapist Assistant (PTA)
Type: Associate in Science
Major Code: PTA-AS
CIP: 1351080601
Educational Pathway: PTA-AS

Program Description

Program Admission

Available Course Course Not Offered Summer 2021

Students must complete all Required Courses with a grade of "C" or higher.

This course introduces the new Physical Therapist Assistant (PTA) student to the physical therapy profession, its professional organizations and the ever-changing world of healthcare. Special emphasis is placed on becoming a healthcare professional and understanding all behaviors and responsibilities which by law, ethical standards and professional standards of conduct are appropriate for a physical therapist assistant. Additional focus is placed upon understanding the role of the PTA in the healthcare system with regard to the role of team members, legal/ethical issues, medical terminology, documentation, stress management, patient safety and privacy, practice parameters and communication skills. The course format is lecture and discussion, with the inclusion of lab activities. Learning in the course is evaluated via assignments, projects, quizzes and examinations. Lab fee required.Students must complete this course with a grade of "C" or higher.
This course is a comprehensive examination of the structure and function of the musculoskeletal system. The concepts of active and passive insufficiency are introduced and their application to human movement made relevant. Special emphasis is placed upon the observation and analysis of human movement. The course format is mainly lecture and discussion. Learning in this course is evaluated via quizzes and cumulative examinations. Students must complete this course with a grade of "C" or higher.
This course is a lab companion to PHT 1120 and provides laboratory practice for those skills requiring hands-on experience. Emphasis is placed upon palpation, goniometric measurements, manual muscle testing and the analysis of human movement. The course format is mainly demonstration and practice of psychomotor skills in the lab environment with the use of patient simulators. Learning in this course is evaluated via competency-based skill checks and/or practical exams. Lab fee required. Students must complete this course with a grade of "C" or higher.
This course emphasizes the essential patient care skills necessary for clinical practice. Students will learn the basics of assessment of medical status through vital signs, performance of safe patient mobility, infection control, prevention of pressure injury, body mechanics, wheelchair fitting and mobility, gait training and associated assistive devices, as well as use of modalities such as compression, thermal and cryotherapy. The course format is mainly lecture and discussion. Learning in this course is evaluated via quizzes and cumulative examinations. Students must complete this course with a grade of "C" or higher.
This course is the lab companion to PHT 1200 and provides laboratory practice for those skills requiring hands-on experience. Students will perform assessment of medical status through vital signs, performance of safe patient mobility, infection control, prevention of pressure injury, wheelchair fitting and mobility, gait training with the appropriate associated assistive devices, as well as use of modalities such as compression, thermal and cryotherapy. The course format is mainly demonstration and practice of psychomotor skills in the lab environment with the use of patient simulators. Learning in this course is evaluated via competency-based skill checks and oral/practical exams. Lab fee required. Students must complete this course with a grade of "C" or higher.
This course emphasizes various physical therapy modalities used to treat pain, edema, weakness, wounds and spasm. Modalities presented include ultrasound, electrical stimulation, soft tissue mobilization, compression wrapping, laser, traction and hydrotherapy. The course format is mainly lecture and discussion. Learning in this course is evaluated via assignments, quizzes and cumulative examinations. Students must complete this course with a grade of "C" or higher.
This course is the lab companion to PHT 1213 and provides laboratory practice for those skills requiring hands-on experience. Emphasis is placed on safe use of modality equipment as well as monitoring and documenting patient simulator responses to the treatments conducted. The course format is mainly demonstration and practice of psychomotor skills in the lab environment with the use of patient simulators. Learning in this course is evaluated via competency-based skill checks and oral/practical exams. Lab fee required. Students must complete this course with a grade of "C" or higher.
This course is the first of two full-time clinical experiences designed to introduce students to the clinical setting. Students will treat patients under the guidance and supervision of a licensed physical therapist or physical therapist assistant. Learning in this course is primarily evaluated with the Clinical Performance Instrument. Lab fee required.
This course is a comprehensive examination of the role of the cardiopulmonary system on physical therapy practice. Common pathologies, treatments, medications, lab values, imaging, and necessary treatment modifications for the cardiovascular, respiratory, and hematologic systems are discussed. The course format is lecture and discussion. Learning in this course is evaluated via assignments, projects, quizzes, and cumulative examinations. Lab fee required.
This course is the lab companion to PHT 2289 and provides laboratory practice for those skills requiring hands-on experience. Emphasis is placed on mobilizing patients with various cardiac precautions, auscultating heart and lung sounds, airway clearance, and interpreting and responding to electrocardiogram abnormalities. The course format is demonstration and practice of psychomotor skills in the lab environment with the use of patient simulators. Learning in this course is evaluated via competency-based skill checks and oral/practice exams. Lab fee required.
This course is a comprehensive examination of common adult neurological disorders. Emphasis is placed upon the etiology, pathology, clinical presentation, medical testing, management, prognosis and neurorehabilitation techniques for cerebral vascular accidents, cerebellar disorders and other balance disorders. Normal pediatric sensorimotor development is reviewed. The course format is lecture and discussion. Learning in this course is evaluated via assignments, projects, quizzes and cumulative examinations.
This course is the lab companion to PHT 2253 and provides laboratory practice for those skills requiring hands-on experience. Emphasis is placed upon students completing the appropriate data collection, neurorehabilitative techniques and patient/caregiver education required for the treatment of disorders discussed in the lecture portion of the course. Students will develop interventions based upon the physical therapist's plan of care/goals, medical reports and the patient response. The course format is demonstration and practice of psychomotor skills in the lab environment with the use of patient simulators. Learning in this course is evaluated via competency-based skill checks and oral/practical exams. Lab fee required.
This course is a comprehensive examination of common adult and pediatric neurological disorders. Emphasis is placed upon the etiology, pathology, clinical presentation, medical testing, management, prognosis, and neurorehabilitation techniques for various disorders including, but not limited to, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries, upper and lower motor neuron disorders, ALS, and pediatric neurological disorders. The course format is lecture and discussion. Learning in this course is evaluated via assignments, projects, quizzes and cumulative examinations.
This course is the lab companion to PHT 2255 and provides laboratory practice for those skills requiring hands-on experience. Emphasis is placed upon students completing the appropriate data collection, neurorehabilitative techniques and patient/caregiver education required for the treatment of disorders discussed in the lecture portion of the course. Students will develop interventions based upon the physical therapist's plan of care/goals, medical reports and the patient response. The course format is demonstration and practice of psychomotor skills in the lab environment with the use of patient simulators. Learning in this course is evaluated via competency-based skill checks and oral/practical exams. Lab fee required.
This course includes the pathologies, treatment modifications, pertinent medications, lab values and imaging for multiple body systems including, but not limited to, immune, integumentary, lymphatic and male reproductive. Additionally, non-system diagnosis including oncology and pertinent genetic/developmental disorders are examined. Lab demonstrations and practice will include wound care treatments such as pulsed lavage, sterile technique, wound dressings, wound cleansing, electrical stimulation, ultrasound, laser compression garments, edema pumps, edema measurement and compete decongestive therapy. Learning in this course is evaluated via assignments, projects, quizzes, cumulative exams, competency-based skill checks and oral/practical exams.
This course includes the pathologies treatment modifications, pertinent medications, lab values, and imaging for multiple body systems including, but not limited to, endocrine, renal, gastrointestinal, hepatic, metabolic and women's reproductive health considerations. The course format is lecture and discussion. Learning in this course is evaluated via assignments, projects, quizzes and cumulative examinations.
This course emphasizes the basics of therapeutic exercise including passive, active-assistive, active, stretching and resistive exercises. It explores the variety of ways these exercises may be performed (manual vs. mechanical) and considerations leading to modification (stage of tissue state and recovery, subjective and objective findings). The course format is mainly lecture and discussion. Learning in this course is evaluated via quizzes and cumulative examinations. Students must complete this course with a grade of "C" or higher.
This course is the lab companion to PHT 2224 and provides laboratory practice for those skills requiring hands-on experience. Emphasis is placed upon passive, active-assistive, active, stretching and resistive exercises. The course format is mainly demonstration and practice of psychomotor skills in the lab environment with the use of patient simulators. Learning in this course is evaluated via competency-based skill checks and oral/practical exams. Lab fee required. Students must complete this course with a grade of "C" or higher.
This course builds on exercise concepts introduced in PHT 2224 and PHT 2224L and integrates knowledge of orthopedic and other system disorders presented in PHT 2310. The conservative and post-surgical rehabilitation, including appropriate data collection, interventions and patient/caregiver education for the specific disorders is emphasized in this course. The course format is mainly lecture and discussion. Learning in this course is evaluated via quizzes and cumulative examinations. Students must complete this course with a grade of "C" or higher.
This course is the lab companion to PHT 2228 and provides laboratory practice for those skills requiring hands-on experience. Emphasis is placed upon students completing the appropriate data collection, interventions and patient/caregiver education required for the treatment of disorders discussed in the lecture portion of this course. Students will develop treatment plans based upon the physical therapist's plan of care/goals, medical reports and the patient response. The course format is mainly demonstration and practice of psychomotor skills in the lab environment with the use of patient simulators. Learning in this course is evaluated via competency-based skill checks and oral/practical exams. Lab fee required. Students must complete this course with a grade of "C" or higher.
This course emphasizes the etiology, pathology, clinical presentation, prognosis and general medical management of a variety of musculoskeletal, cardiopulmonary, integumentary, metabolic and other system disorders most commonly seen in physical therapy practice. Medical management, including lab values, imaging, pharmacology and their significance and consideration in treatment is emphasized. The course format is mainly lecture and discussion. Learning in this course is evaluated via quizzes and cumulative examinations. Students must complete this course with a grade of "C" or higher.
This course is the second of two full-time clinical experiences designed to prepare students for entry-level clinical practice. Students will treat patients under the guidance and supervision of a licensed physical therapist or a physical therapist assistant. Learning in this course is primarily evaluated with the Clinical Performance Instrument.
This course guides the physical therapist assistant student in the transition from student to licensed PTA. The course emphasizes Florida laws and administrative code regarding physical therapy. Students will also learn test-taking strategies for the national PTA licensing examination. The course also involves self-examination of behaviors, strengths, weaknesses and practice constraints in clinical settings within the scope of legal, ethical, professional and practice parameters that have been set for the profession of physical therapy. The course format is mainly lecture and discussion. Learning in this course is evaluated via online discussions, presentations, quizzes and cumulative examinations. Lab fee required. Students must complete this course with a grade of "C" or higher.
This course is primarily for science majors or students with a strong biology background. It is a study of the molecular and cellular composition and function of living organisms. Emphasis will be given to structure, chemical metabolism and genetic mechanisms. Laboratory illustrates basic biological principles. Lab fee required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.

Or any Area B or C General Education Science Course (Note: BSC 2010C is a prerequisite for BSC 2093C)

This is the first part of a two-semester course that investigates in detail the structure and function of humans. The course is primarily designed for students of healthcare professions, biology or physical education. We will utilize a "system" approach, examining each organ system at the cellular, tissue, organ and system levels and discuss interactions with other systems. Emphasis will be placed on the homeostatic rather than the dysfunctional individual. Lab fee required.
This course is the second part of a two-semester course that investigates the structure and function of humans. The course is designed for students of healthcare professions, biology or physical education. We utilize a "systems" approach, examining each organ system at the cellular, tissue, organ and system levels and discuss interactions with other systems. Emphasis will be placed on homeostatic rather than dysfunctional individuals. Lab fee required.
This is a course in the process of expository writing. Students will read essays and compose papers that are unified, organized, logically developed and supported, clearly stated and well-focused. Research techniques are introduced and incorporated into at least one composition. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Students must pass the core assignments with a grade of "C" or higher. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Communications requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.

Students can satisfy the English Requirement with either ENC 1101 English I or ENC 1102 English II.

This humanities course is designed to introduce students to the critical study of human culture and its varied expressions across time. Students will employ interdisciplinary methods of analysis through engagement with diverse cultural artifacts in order to develop a foundational understanding of the human experience and its connection to culture. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for A.A. degree-seeking students.
This humanities course is designed to introduce students to the critical study of human culture and its varied expressions across time. Students will employ interdisciplinary methods of analysis through engagement with diverse cultural artifacts in order to develop a foundational understanding of the human experience and its connection to culture. This course partially satisfies the writing requirements of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities for A.A. degree seeking students.
A course designed to promote the understanding and appreciation of humankind's cultural heritage in the prehistoric, Egyptian, Mesopotamian, Judaic, Greek and Roman periods. Representative works in art, music, literature and philosophy will be studied. Global culturalism will be incorporated into the course content. The student will be introduced to Internet resources as they pertain to appropriate thematic materials. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to promote the understanding and appreciation of humankind's cultural heritage in the Early Christian and Medieval periods. Representative works in art, music, literature and philosophy will be studied. Global culturalism will be incorporated into the course content. The student will be introduced to Internet resources as they pertain to appropriate thematic materials. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to promote the understanding and appreciation of the creative process and world culture. Representative works in art, literature, music and philosophy will be studied from the Renaissance and Baroque periods. Global culturalism will be incorporated into the course content. The student will be introduced to Internet resources as they pertain to appropriate thematic materials. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to promote the understanding and appreciation of the creative process and world culture. Representative works in art, literature, music and philosophy will be studied from the Enlightenment and Romantic periods. Global culturalism will be incorporated into the course content. The student will be introduced to Internet resources as they pertain to appropriate thematic materials. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to study representative works of the 20th and early 21st centuries in the performing arts, visual arts, music, literature, film and philosophy so that the student will appreciate the foundations of the 20th century and allow projections into the future. Global culturalism will be incorporated into the course content. The student will be introduced to Internet resources as they pertain to appropriate thematic materials. This course will also show how technology interacts with culture in the contemporary world. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to study representative works of the 20th and early 21st centuries in the performing arts, visual arts, music, literature, film and philosophy so that the student will appreciate the foundations of the 20th century and allow projections into the future. Global culturalism will be incorporated into the course content. The student will be introduced to Internet resources as they pertain to appropriate thematic materials. This course will also show how technology interacts with culture in the contemporary world. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to introduce the student to the contributions of women in the humanities. It will examine their contributions to literature, art and music from the Classical period to the present day. Students will learn how gender has influenced production of the arts throughout these periods. Examining notions of masculinity and femininity will be a key component of the course and their various representations in art, literature and music will be a major subject of study. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to introduce the student to the contributions of women in the humanities. It will examine their contributions to literature, art and music from the Classical period to the present day. Students will learn how gender has influenced production of the arts throughout these periods. Examining notions of masculinity and femininity will be a key component of the course and their various representations in art, literature and music will be a major subject of study. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to introduce the student to the Indian and Southeast Asian cultures. Emphasis will be placed on the basic myths underlying culture, their manifestation in the arts and their diffusion throughout South and Southeast Asia. Representative works in literature, mythology, philosophy and the visual arts will be studied. The student will be introduced to Internet resources as they pertain to appropriate thematic materials. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
Honors Asian Humanities is designed to introduce the student to the cultures of India, Tibet and Southeast Asia. The basic myths underlying culture will be studied as well as their manifestation in the arts. The course will explore the development of Indian thought with special emphasis on early Buddhism and the development of Mahayana Buddhist schools. Representative works in literature, mythology, philosophy and the visual arts will be studied. Archeological rites in Cambodia, Burma and Thailand will be studied as examples of myth in architecture. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to explore African American cultures and artistic manifestations and to promote increased awareness, understanding, degrees of tolerance and aesthetic appreciation of African American heritage. Pre-European African influences to modern cultural values of African American societies will be examined. Contemplative objects representing both visual and performing arts will be studied in their historical context. The student will be introduced to Internet resources as they pertain to appropriate thematic materials. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to explore African American cultures and artistic manifestations and to promote increased awareness, understanding, degrees of tolerance and aesthetic appreciation of African American heritage. Pre-European African influences to modern cultural values of African American societies will be examined. Contemplative objects representing both visual and performing arts will be studied in their historical context. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to introduce the student to Latin American cultures and to promote the understanding and appreciation of its cultural heritage. Ancient to modern cultures will be surveyed. Emphasis will be placed on cultural roots and myth as well as artists' commitment to social and political struggle. Representative works in the visual arts, literature and music will be studied. No knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese is required. The student will be introduced to Internet resources as they pertain to appropriate thematic materials. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to introduce the student to Latin American cultures and to promote the understanding and appreciation of Latin American heritage. Ancient to modern cultures will be surveyed. Emphasis will be placed on cultural roots and myth as well as artists' commitment to social and political struggle. Representative works in the visual arts, literature and music will be studied. No knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese is required. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to introduce students to the cultural contributions of members of the LGBTQ community and to promote a better understanding, awareness and appreciation for this culture's unique traditions. Emphasis will be placed on the origins of the culture and on the historical context of the production and use of artistic creation. Expressive cultural artifacts will be the primary focus of study. These include visual and performance art as well as works of literature. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course covers the study of fundamental philosophical problems and concepts. Speculation about limits of human understanding, value judgments, foundations of morality and speculation about the existence of God in order to present students with the tools for constructing their own philosophy. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
The course covers the study of fundamental philosophical problems and concepts. Speculation about limits of human understanding, value judgments, foundations of morality and speculation about the existence of God will be covered in order to present students with the tools for constructing their own philosophy. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
Discussions of the moral problems of contemporary society such as abortion, the sexual revolution, war, violence, aging, civil disobedience, modern medical practices and other issues take place in this course. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is an ideological study of the major religions of the world emphasizing the relationships of their major tenets to our modern society. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
American Literature I is a survey of the historical and cultural development of American belles-lettres from 1630 to the late nineteenth century with attention to the influence of prevalent ideas and expressions of the age. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is a survey of the historical and cultural development of American literature from the late nineteenth through the twentieth century. It focuses on the fiction, poetry and drama that precede and constitute the Modern Era. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course will provide a brief, but comprehensive study of the writing styles of selected African American writers. This study will include a historical perspective of the racial climate in American society, the connection between literature by African Americans and will examine current criticism on selected texts. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course introduces students to art from a variety of cultures and historical contexts. Topics include major art movements, varieties of materials and aesthetic theories. Coursework covers formal terms, elements and principles common to the study of art and architecture. The course stresses the relationship of design principles to various art forms including, but not limited to, sculpture, painting and architecture. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and analyze a variety of artistic styles, periods and media and students will have an increased vocabulary of art terminology. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course is an integrated study of the main developments of the visual art forms (architecture, sculpture and painting) from Paleolithic man to the Early Renaissance. World art will be integrated into the content. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is an integrated study of the main developments of the visual art forms (architecture, sculpture and painting) from the 16th century to the present. World art will be integrated into the content. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to help students become more active, critical viewers of films and to be able to communicate that understanding in writing. Like written forms of literature, movies are texts that can be analyzed and interpreted. Students will view a number of films from different time periods, genres and artistic approaches. Lectures will concentrate on the narrative and stylistic elements used by film makers. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030 and the Humanities Area B General Education requirement.
This is a survey course designed to introduce students to the cinematic arts of a particular national cinema and to encourage them to think globally. Emphasis will be given to internationally recognized filmmakers of foreign cinemas and their recent new directors. Students will watch and analyze numerous films. They will study the aesthetics of film language as well as the social and cultural conditions that produce the cinema. The course will encourage student understanding of the intellectual, spiritual and moral issues that unite people despite differences in time, place, language and culture. Specific film content may vary from term to term. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030 and the Humanities Area B General Education requirement.
This course is a survey of the development of British literature from Anglo-Saxon times through the eighteenth century with attention to the historical background, the continuity of essential traditions and the characteristic temper of successive periods. Major emphasis is on the Old English, Middle English and Renaissance periods. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
British Literature II emphasizes the relevance of Romanticism, Victorianism and the first half of the twentieth century to contemporary thought. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to further student understanding of the concepts and applications of analytical and theoretical approaches to literature. Students will employ critical thinking in their interrogation of the texts. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course will explore trends and influences in literature from World War II to the present. Contemporary literature will be examined as a reflection of the philosophy of modern life and as a reflection of the student's world. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course will explore trends and influences in literature from World War II to the present. Contemporary literature will be examined as a reflection of the philosophy of modern life and as a reflection of the student's world. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to create an awareness of the ideas, techniques and historical relationships in world literature from the Enlightenment to the present. The Enlightenment, Romanticism, the 19th Century (Realism and Naturalism) and Modernism will be studied. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to create an awareness of the ideas, techniques and historical relationships in world literature from the Enlightenment to the present. The Enlightenment, Romanticism, the 19th Century (Realism and Naturalism) and Modernism will be studied. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course traces the historical origins, characteristics and stylistic developments of rock music from a musical and sociological perspective. This course is not recommended for music majors. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to introduce the student to primary forms and genres of blues and jazz music in both their historical and cultural context. Blues and jazz will be explored methodically as a distinctly American contribution to world music. The course will feature lecture and performance presentations by some of Florida's better known musicians and commentators. Literary and visual images of blues and jazz idioms will be incorporated into the course content. Assigned readings with active listening are an integral part of the course. The student will be introduced to Internet resources on the subject of blues and jazz themes. Students will be required to compose a journal with reactionary criticisms of blues and jazz guests and must complete a project that presents biographical and musical materials about a selected blues or jazz musician. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This course fulfills the Area B Humanities requirement.
Open to all students, this course is designed for the musical layman and is a survey course devoted to music in world civilization. Included is a study of the music relating to the background of the life and other arts of the times. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course is designed for the musical layman and is a survey course devoted to music in world civilization. Included is a study of the music relating to the background of the life and other arts of the times. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for A.A. degree-seeking students. Honors level content. Permission from Honors Director required.
This course is an introduction to music literature, history and culture for music majors. Topics to be addressed include an overview of musical repertories and cultures from the western art music tradition, American jazz and a selected case study of non-western music from a variety of musical traditions and historical periods, including from the western middle ages and north India. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course will explore the dramatic form and structure of a play. Students will read and analyze the script in order to study the playwright's intentions, methods and meanings. The script will be examined as a blueprint for production and performance. This course partially fulfills the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course surveys the art of theatre. Students will learn about the process of creating theatre through study of the production process and the many artists who participate in the creation of theatre. Through videos and attendance at live theatre, students will also learn the various forms of theatre, such as tragedy and comedy and various modes of presentation, both presentational and representational. Students will also be introduced to theatre's historic roots and its diversity as expressed in various cultures throughout the globe. This course contains a reading and writing component. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B. E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course investigates the foundational African American presence in U.S. theatre. Through dramatic literature and theories of racial construction, the course will explore the historical, cultural and socio-political underpinnings of this theatre as an artistic form in American culture.
This course is a study of the fundamental topics in advanced algebra with emphasis on applications, the understanding of the function concept and manipulative skills. Major topics include operations on algebraic expressions and complex numbers, solving polynomial equations and inequalities, absolute value equations and inequalities and rational equations and inequalities, applications, functions, exponents and logarithms, graphs of polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions and systems of equations and inequalities. The use of graphing calculators will be incorporated throughout the course. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
or higher level MAC or MAP prefix course that meets General Education requirements.
This is an introduction to the basic principles of associative learning. The primary focus of the course is on how organisms learn about their relationships that occur in the environment. This will be achieved through studying the phenomena of classical and operant conditioning in animals and humans. Specific techniques for understanding behavior are presented. Honors level content. Permission required from the Honors Director.
This course will examine the clinical description and etiology of psychological disorders from an integrative perspective. Emphasis will be placed on theories of causation and current research on treatment modalities. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course explores the effects of genetic, psychological, maturational and social factors at various stages during the lifespan. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Some sections of DEP 2004 have service-learning components. Please refer to class notes in schedule of classes for details.
This course applies psychological principles to individual and group functioning in organizational settings. Major topics include employee selection, motivation, job satisfaction, leadership and performance evaluation. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course explores the major theoretical perspectives to personality theory, including psychodynamic, trait, biological, humanistic, behavioral and cognitive systems. The course will also evaluate practical applications for the areas of counseling, business, education, vocational skills and personal growth. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This is an introductory course which surveys the field of psychology and basic principles and concepts utilized to understand human behavior. The major areas of study include development, learning, perception, motivation, emotions, personality, abnormal behavior, psychotherapy and testing measurements. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Some sections of PSY 2012 have service-learning components. Please refer to class notes in schedule of classes for details. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for AA degree seeking students.
This course will examine influential experiments conducted in psychology over the last 100 years. These landmark studies have influenced and, at times, changed psychological principles and ethical standards. Major studies are in the areas of biopsychology, learning, memory, development, emotion, motivation, personality, psychopathology, therapies and social psychology. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This is an introductory psychology course with an Honors designation. It intends to survey the field of psychology and the basic principles and concepts utilized to understand major behavior. The major areas of study include methodology, statistics and a research literature survey as well as the major areas of the field of psychology. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for AA degree seeking students.
This course is an introductory survey of sociology covering its scope, methods and general principles. Topics emphasized include group behavior, race relations, population, social institutions, social change and social stratification. The purpose of the course is to assist the student in acquiring an understanding of society. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course is an introductory survey of sociology covering its scope, methods and general principles. Topics emphasized include group behavior, race relations, population, social institutions, social change and social stratification. The purpose of the course is to assist the student in acquiring an understanding of society. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Note: This course contains Honors level material. Acceptance into the Honors Program or Permission from the Honors Director required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course is an in-depth analysis into the scope and causes of major problem areas from the perspective of both the individual and the community. Consideration will be given to various possible remedial approaches to each problem area. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is applied sociology that will pursue a unique, original research project each semester. It provides students with an in-depth understanding of social scientific research through experimental investigation. Utilizing the research project as a point of focus, this course includes training in all aspects of empirical research, including literature review, methodology, data collection, data coding, data analysis and presentation of results. Previous coursework in sociology or psychology is recommended. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director.
This course is designed to study the changing culture of our nation. Issues of race, ethnicity, gender, class, nationality and globalism will be explored. This course is also designed to provide information and strategies for living and working in a pluralistic, multi-cultural society. Values and ethics of diversity and commonality will be emphasized. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course will explore the dynamics of conflict from a variety of frames. Students will be provided with valuable insight about conflict that will help lead to an understanding regarding the conflicts they are likely to face in life, at school or work, in society as well as those they observe in national headlines. An introduction to the dispute resolution practices of mediation, facilitation and negotiation will be conducted. The examination of how one's gender and cultural perspective may influence the approach and outcome of the conflict will be discussed. Current trends and issues within the field of conflict management and resolution will be reviewed. The course will engage students in the theory and application of addressing conflict management and resolution on an individual, interpersonal and international perspective. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to present students with an interdisciplinary study of the sexual functioning of humans. Course information is drawn liberally from the disciplines of sociology, psychology and biology, providing students with an integrated introduction to the study of human sexual behavior. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is a historical and comparative study of courtship, mate selection, engagement, marriage, husband-wife relationships and child-rearing in the United States. Emphasis is placed upon the changing contemporary family with respect to social and economic status, sex, sources of marital conflict and social values. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course will examine normative deviance through the sociological lens. It will focus on the social context, behaviors and societal reactions associated with deviance. Criminal and noncriminal forms of deviance will be investigated using a variety of theoretical perspectives. In approaching deviance sociologically, this course will highlight the social constructions of deviance and the influence of social control and stigmatization as reactions to deviant behavior. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
Total Credits: 74

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Tuition and Fee Comparison*

 Seminole StateUFFSUUCF
Tuition and Fees$3,131$6,380$6,538$6,379
Room and Board-0-$10,590$11,088$10,300
Books and Supplies$1,000$890$1,000$1,200
Total$4,131$17,860$18,626$17,879

For more information on Seminole State's tuition and fees, please see the 2020-21 fee schedule.

* Tuition costs are based on Fall 2020 and Spring 2021 terms, with 15 credit hours per term for in-state students. Dorm fees, meal plans and book expenses are estimates based on information provided on each university's website. Lab fees and other fees that may be assessed at the time of registration may be viewed in the College fee schedule. As Seminole State is a commuter college with no residence halls on its campuses, costs for room and board are not calculated.

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