Digital Cinema and Television Production Associate in Science

Lights, camera, action! Be the creative eyes behind the scenes producing content the public raves about. From logistical coordinating and pre-production concepts, to audio editing and photographic composition, learn all the skills you need to be a star employee in the television and video production industry.

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Getting Started: Fall 12W Session

June 13:  Financial Aid


Sept. 7:  Application


Sept. 12:  Classes Begin

Other Important Dates »

Why Seminole State?

  • Affordable tuition: Earn a state university education at about half the cost.
  • Small class sizes: With classes of 30 or less, you don’t have to learn in an auditorium.
  • Online degree option: Most courses for our A.S. degrees are offered in person and online, so you can study when and where you want. 
  • Seamless transitionMost A.S. graduates earn credits that can be applied to a bachelor's degree at Seminole State or at the University of Central Florida through DirectConnect® to UCF.*
  • Job Placement: According to state data, most Seminole State A.S. programs have placement rates above 90 percent.

*A.S. students who are planning to transfer to bachelor's degree programs should meet with a counselor, advisor or specialist to make sure the required courses are taken and the entry requirements are met.

Additional Information

Digital Cinema and Television Production
Type: Associate in Science
Major Code: MMTFP-AS
CIP: 1609070213

Program Description

Available Course Course Not Offered Fall 2022
This is a course in the preparation and production of television programs for airing at the College and on local public access TV. Programs scheduled include activities at Seminole State College and in the community. Lab fee required.
RTV 1201 and RTV 1201L may substitute for RTV 1201C
The course includes beginning theory and practices as a platform to springboard into live sound reinforcement as well as recording and broadcasting technology, incorporating the signal processing and hands-on techniques found in a myriad of real world applications. The eventual goal is to learn to incorporate audio gear for optimum performance in a variety of professional operations.
The purpose of this course is to develop skills in using more advanced equipment for television production and to apply these skills in producing television programs. The course will stress writing, producing, directing and editing television programs. Lab fee required.
In this course, students learn single and multiple camera field production techniques in producing documentary and news style programs. Emphasizes working in teams utilizing portable field equipment such as lighting, audio and camera. Lab fee required.
In this course, students will learn editing techniques and other post-production processes, including A/B roll editing, digital video effects, electronic graphics and audio mixing. Students will be introduced to non-linear editing systems. Lab fee required.
This course will instruct students to operate non-linear editing systems focusing on AVID technologies. Students will become familiar with software applications related to special effects, audio enhancements and image manipulation. Lab fee required.
This is the capstone course for the TV and Film program. Students will produce a demonstration reel exhibiting their best work in all areas of pre-production, production and post-production. The course should be a benefit to students seeking employment or wishing to transfer to a senior institution. Lab fee required.
This course is an introduction to the exciting world of digital imaging. Students will be provided with a start-to-finish understanding of successful image-making by offering hands-on projects, demonstrations and discussions aimed at boosting creative expression and productivity in a challenging, yet fun, environment. Students will learn how to use their digital camera as an effective tool for visual communication as well as how to work efficiently in Photoshop, how to combine images and add text and finally, how to optimize their creations for final output. Students will produce at least three portfolio pieces. Lab fee required.

Choose one course:

This course focuses on digital post-production used for film, animation, video, digital media and the Web. This course identifies production methods, compositing and sophisticated motion control for high-quality, two-dimensional animation. Focus is placed on digital media components, video tape and screen outputs for special and specialty projects while exploring foundations for computer-aided digital production. The topic of work flow issues and the variety of design and production vehicles will be addressed. Lab fee required.
This course provides an investigation into the dynamics of various organizing principles while exercising both traditional and contemporary media. Students explore the visual elements and fundamental principles of design in order to determine the constructs of order. Elements of visual literacy are also used to explore issues of symbol and human communication. Process and development are emphasized. This course is suitable for both the art major and non-art major. Lab fee required.
This course explores the avenues of contemporary digital design, highlighting the importance of process, innovation and communication. Students will become familiar with design projects ranging from traditional print, sophisticated websites, interactive digital media and motion graphics. The course will focus on developing and refining the design concept and the execution strategy. Lab fee required.
This course is designed to help students become more active, critical viewers of films and to be able to communicate that understanding in writing. Like written forms of literature, movies are texts that can be analyzed and interpreted. Students will view a number of films from different time periods, genres and artistic approaches. Lectures will concentrate on the narrative and stylistic elements used by film makers. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030 and the Humanities Area B General Education requirement.
Open to all students, this course is an introduction to the fundamentals of photography and includes camera operation, pictorial composition, exposure, developing and printing as a means of personal photographic expression. A manual 35 mm, single-lens reflex camera is required, as is the purchase of expendable materials. This course is for art majors and non-art majors. Lab fee required.
This course teaches students procedures and practices of directing a variety of television productions. Emphasis will be placed on working with writers and producers in directing programs from concept to product. Lab fee required.
This course is a survey of the arts and crafts of the theatre. Students will discuss the playscript, the physical stage and the profession. The roles of the artists involved in theatre performance and production will be examined. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is a survey of play scripts from Classical Greece to postmodernism and contemporary drama. A succinct history of western drama will be examined. This course partially fulfills the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course will explore the dramatic form and structure of a play. Students will read and analyze the script in order to study the playwright's intentions, methods and meanings. The script will be examined as a blueprint for production and performance. This course partially fulfills the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
Theatre Production and Performance is open to all students of the College and is required of all theatre majors and minors. Theatre Production and Performance presents major productions throughout the year. Students gain credit through performing roles and technical work. May be repeated for credit five times.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn internship credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn internship credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
This is an art travel/study course combining preparation on campus, travel and study. Content is variable depending on the program in which the student enrolls and the specific topics to be covered. Students must be 18 years of age on or before departure.
This course provides students the opportunity for creative expression in the verbal arts. Although drama, fiction and poetry are studied and critiqued, students are free to concentrate in the genre of their choice and are encouraged to enter contests and to submit work for publication.
This course is an expansion of CRW 2001, focusing on formal writing exercises with more frequent deadlines and critiques in a workshop atmosphere emphasizing individual instruction. This course may be taken four times for credit. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
In this course, topics of current interest are presented in group instruction.
This course explores the avenues of contemporary digital design, highlighting the importance of process, innovation and communication. Students will become familiar with design projects ranging from traditional print, sophisticated websites, interactive digital media and motion graphics. The course will focus on developing and refining the design concept and the execution strategy. Lab fee required.
This course provides a broad introduction to sound design principles as applied to moving pictures and interactive systems. Creative use of sound is explored through an introduction to field recording and the use of digital audio workstations. Students use original sound recordings from other departments as well as those sampled from an extensive sound library in order to create sound pieces both with and without images. Lab fee required.
This course gives the student an in-depth look at character design, development, rigging and animation. Character creation will include segmented and solid model mesh of bipeds and quadrupeds. Students will examine techniques used to create facial expressions and lip sync using phonemes. Lab fee required.
This course is designed to teach an intermediate level of three-dimensional animation for digital media. Emphasis is placed on building 3D world space that tells a story. It will allow students to build upon concepts such as environments, physical motion and modeling techniques, rendering and post-production. Lab fee required.
This course focuses on digital post-production used for film, animation, video, digital media and the Web. This course identifies production methods, compositing and sophisticated motion control for high-quality, two-dimensional animation. Focus is placed on digital media components, video tape and screen outputs for special and specialty projects while exploring foundations for computer-aided digital production. The topic of work flow issues and the variety of design and production vehicles will be addressed. Lab fee required.
This course includes 2D tools for compositing, animation, and effects that digital media professionals, web designers, and video professionals use. Fundamentals in the design of composited layers are combined with sophisticated visuals and audio effects for animations. Students are also introduced to the use of digital assets created in object-oriented and digital imaging software.
This course prepares students for professional situations through the creation of individual demo reels, resumes, websites and portfolios by emphasizing business structure. Topics such as studio hierarchy, production bidding, media distribution and professional growth will be included to highlight many of the important aspects of business in order for students to attain and sustain a professional career. Lab fee required.
In this course, topics of current interest are presented in group instruction.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
The Introduction to Computer Graphics course is designed to familiarize publishing, graphic, art and multi-media students with the basics of hardware and software of the computer system for electronic publishing. Students will be familiarized with commercial graphic design and printing issues as applied to publishing systems. Lab fee required.
This course is designed to teach the concepts, terminology and principles of desktop publishing using industry computer software to communicate visual concepts used for the printing of publications such as brochures, advertisements, books and magazines. The student will develop the skills necessary to create publications designed for print publishing and production. Lab fee required.
This is an advanced course in page layout software. Designed to teach advanced techniques and principles of digital publishing to assist students in gaining stronger creative control and improved production capabilities. Students create publications displaying multi-faceted integration of sophisticated text and graphic techniques. Emphasis will focus on the development of long-page publications and Internet connectivity. Lab fee required.
This course is a foundation to computer-aided digital publishing. It will explore various means of viewing visual elements in design. Focus is upon the foundations of professional design skills for computer graphics, multimedia, film and video and animation. Various media are used to explore traditional media, photography, illustration, animation, film and video and other image media development. The student is introduced to typography, typeface and type as a design element as well as composition, layout, pagination, style, balance, format and project planning. Lab fee required.
This course is an introduction to Photoshop software which provides an extensive variety of electronic tools for manipulating photographs and creating illustrations. The course is designed for the graphics individual who wishes to integrate photography with page layouts. Students will learn the basics of scanning, retouching, color correcting, proofing and output to printer devices. Lab fee required.
This course teaches typography as a primary tool of all graphic designers. The emphasis of the course is in the elements and anatomy of type and its expressive, technical and visual aspects. This course also teaches typeface, size, leading, line length, headlines, grids, hierarchy and the overall character in developing creative elements. Readability in type is examined in the development of publications - ads, books, brochures, identity systems and posters.
In this course topics of current interest are presented in group instruction.
In this course topics of current interest are presented in group instruction.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn internship credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn internship credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
A global, multi-cultural experience has become an increasingly vital part of a student’s education. This study abroad course provides students with opportunities to explore significant international, historical and contemporary sites. Students are exposed to the cultural influences of the arts, graphic arts and architecture. Lectures and course work are complimented by walking tours led by experienced faculty and guest professionals. Students must be 18 years of age on or before departure.
The course includes beginning theory and practices as a platform to springboard into live sound reinforcement as well as recording and broadcasting technology, incorporating the signal processing and hands-on techniques found in a myriad of real world applications. The eventual goal is to learn to incorporate audio gear for optimum performance in a variety of professional operations.
The purpose of this course is to develop skills in using more advanced equipment for television production and to apply these skills in producing television programs. The course will stress writing, producing, directing and editing television programs. Lab fee required.
This course teaches students procedures and practices of directing a variety of television productions. Emphasis will be placed on working with writers and producers in directing programs from concept to product. Lab fee required.
In this course, students will learn editing techniques and other post-production processes, including A/B roll editing, digital video effects, electronic graphics and audio mixing. Students will be introduced to non-linear editing systems. Lab fee required.
This course will instruct students to operate non-linear editing systems focusing on AVID technologies. Students will become familiar with software applications related to special effects, audio enhancements and image manipulation. Lab fee required.
This is the capstone course for the TV and Film program. Students will produce a demonstration reel exhibiting their best work in all areas of pre-production, production and post-production. The course should be a benefit to students seeking employment or wishing to transfer to a senior institution. Lab fee required.
In this course, topics of current interest are presented in group instruction. This course may be taken four times for credit. Lab fee required.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
This course is an introduction to the methods, tools and materials of scenery construction and stage lighting. Students will receive extensive experience in the theatre scene shop. Additional lab hours will be required.
This course covers study in the techniques of achieving a visual character through the application of stage make-up. The following make-up techniques are covered: straight, corrective, old-age, imaginative (clown and fantasy), three-dimensional (noses, warts, scars, wrinkling) and hair (beards, mustaches, eyebrows, sideburns). Lab fee required.
This course is an introduction to the design process as it relates to the theatre. It includes study in design principles, script analysis and stylistic considerations. Students will learn basic skills culminating in conceptualizing and developing a design project.
The course focuses on the practice of understanding and evaluating the creative process, visual demands, fabrication techniques, and custom project logistics for themed environmental design. The course addresses the processes and requirements of the art director/designer for themed environments such as theme park design, film/television production design, retailing/display installations, trade show exhibits, zoo and museum dioramas, restaurants and immersive design, and advanced theatrical stage designs. The course will examine the roles of the client/designer relationship, the designer and the fabricator responsibilities, and the director/producer designer relationship within the themed environment creation process. The course will review standard industry fabrication practices, specialty products and common materials, construction and production techniques. The course will explore research techniques and resources, explore the history of this amazing field of study, and how to read the minds of the client/producer/director.
This course is a study in the development, theory and practice of all areas of technical theatre production.
This course is a continuation of the methods of fundamental stagecraft. Special emphasis on technical drawing and drafting for the stage as well as experience in the scene shop.
This course is an introduction to the principles of acting, including basic stage movement and theatre terminology. Work in the following areas will be studied: concentration, imagination, communication, improvisation, development of character, study of relationships and preparation for scene study.
In this course students will learn to be simulated performers (patients, family members, healthcare workers, etc.) to prepare for employment as a standardized participant. This course is recommended for both performers and healthcare professionals to build interpersonal communication skills and a greater understanding of the behavioral aspects of patient care. Instruction will follow standards of best practices of the Association of Standardized Patient Educators.
This course covers the identification and application of physical technique for actors. The major emphasis of this course is to provide an expressive range of gesture, movement dynamics and use of space for the ability to interpret text analysis into physical characterization for the actor. The course also offers actors techniques for increased physical flexibility, alignment and control. This course is recommended for all public performers.
This course is a continuation of skills taught in Acting I. Areas to be covered include exercises to develop the actor's ability to interact with others, examination of the structure of the given circumstances of the text and its relationship to performance, continued work in character development, monologues and scene presentations and basic audition processes.
This course is designed for music and theatre students to implement songs and staging of musical theatre and opera scenes. Students will expand their knowledge of, and ability to perform, this genre-specific repertoire. Vocal instruction techniques will use musical theatre and operatic literature in solo and ensemble performances.
This course is an introduction to the art of directing in the theatre. Students will become aware of the responsibilities of the director in the areas of research and analysis, organization, blocking, coaching and communication. Students will direct actors in scenes.
The major emphasis of this course is to help individuals develop, maintain and improve their voice production via the right use of breathing, pitch and force. The minor emphasis is to help improve articulation. This course is recommended for all public performers.
This course is an application of techniques studied in Voice and Articulation I with emphasis on improving articulation and pronunciation. Consideration is given to an elementary study of phonetics.
This is a course in the process of expository writing. Students will read essays and compose papers that are unified, organized, logically developed and supported, clearly stated and well-focused. Research techniques are introduced and incorporated into at least one composition. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Students must pass the core assignments with a grade of "C" or higher. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Communications requirement for degree seeking students.
This course introduces students to art from a variety of cultures and historical contexts. Topics include major art movements, varieties of materials and aesthetic theories. Coursework covers formal terms, elements and principles common to the study of art and architecture. The course stresses the relationship of design principles to various art forms including, but not limited to, sculpture, painting and architecture. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and analyze a variety of artistic styles, periods and media and students will have an increased vocabulary of art terminology. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for degree seeking students.
This humanities course is designed to introduce students to the critical study of human culture and its varied expressions across time. Students will employ interdisciplinary methods of analysis through engagement with diverse cultural artifacts in order to develop a foundational understanding of the human experience and its connection to culture. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for degree seeking students.
This humanities course is designed to introduce students to the critical study of human culture and its varied expressions across time. Students will employ interdisciplinary methods of analysis through engagement with diverse cultural artifacts in order to develop a foundational understanding of the human experience and its connection to culture. This course partially satisfies the writing requirements of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities for degree seeking students.
This course is designed to further student understanding of the concepts and applications of analytical and theoretical approaches to literature. Students will employ critical thinking in their interrogation of the texts. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for degree seeking students.
Open to all students, this course is designed for the musical layman and is a survey course devoted to music in world civilization. Included is a study of the music relating to the background of the life and other arts of the times. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for degree seeking students.
This course is designed for the musical layman and is a survey course devoted to music in world civilization. Included is a study of the music relating to the background of the life and other arts of the times. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for degree-seeking students. Honors level content. Permission from Honors Director required.
This course covers fundamental philosophical questions of the human condition including: discussions of existence, identity, ethics, culture, free will, personhood, politics, distributive justice, and much more. Students engage in deep critical thought, analysis of philosophical perspectives including their own, and ultimately gain perspective on how philosophy manifests itself in every aspect of our lived experience. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement.
This course covers fundamental philosophical questions of the human condition including: discussions of existence, identity, ethics, culture, free will, personhood, politics, distributive justice, and much more. Students engage in deep critical thought, analysis of philosophical perspectives including their own, and ultimately gain perspective on how philosophy manifests itself in every aspect of our lived experience. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement.
This course surveys the art of theatre. Students will learn about the process of creating theatre through study of the production process and the many artists who participate in the creation of theatre. Through videos and attendance at live theatre, students will also learn the various forms of theatre, such as tragedy and comedy and various modes of presentation, both presentational and representational. Students will also be introduced to theatre's historic roots and its diversity as expressed in various cultures throughout the globe. This course contains a reading and writing component. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B. E. 6A-10.030. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for degree seeking students.
This course is a study of the fundamental topics in advanced algebra with emphasis on applications, the understanding of the function concept and manipulative skills. Major topics include operations on algebraic expressions and complex numbers, solving polynomial equations and inequalities, absolute value equations and inequalities and rational equations and inequalities, applications, functions, exponents and logarithms, graphs of polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions and systems of equations and inequalities. The use of graphing calculators will be incorporated throughout the course. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for degree seeking students.
This is a first course in analytic geometry and the theory and application of calculus. Selected topics include a review of functions, limits and continuity, the derivative, differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions and their inverses, the Mean Value and Intermediate Value Theorems, extrema and graph sketching, area and the definite integral, anti-differentiation and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and integration of transcendental functions and their inverses. A graphing calculator will be used throughout the course. Students should ask the instructor which calculator will be used. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for degree seeking students.
This is a first course in analytic geometry and the theory and application of calculus. Selected topics include a review of functions, limits and continuity, the derivative, differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions and their inverses, the Mean Value and Intermediate Value Theorems, extrema and graph sketching, area and the definite integral, anti-differentiation and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and integration of transcendental functions and their inverses. The graphing calculator will be used throughout the course. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for degree seeking students.
The following topics will be covered in this course: sets and Venn diagrams, logic, inductive and deductive reasoning, counting principles, permutations and combinations, probability, descriptive statistics and geometry. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for degree seeking students. It is recommended that students without college-level math credits have completed a secondary-level course in Geometry, Algebra 2, Precalculus, Calculus, or Math for College Liberal Arts with a grade of ‘B’ or higher before taking this course.
This course provides an opportunity for students to see mathematics used in ways not seen in traditional mathematics courses. Topics are selected from the following: financial mathematics, numbers and number systems, elementary number theory and graph theory. Additional topics may be included at the discretion of the instructor. History of mathematics, critical thinking skills, problem-solving techniques and the appropriate use of technology will be used throughout the course. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for degree seeking students. It is recommended that students without college-level math credits have completed a secondary-level course in Geometry, Algebra 2, Precalculus, Calculus, or Math for College Liberal Arts with a grade of ‘B’ or higher before taking this course.
This course introduces descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, two-sample inferences, correlation and regression and nonparametric tests. This course is a first course in statistical methods for those students entering a science or business-related field. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for degree seeking students. It is recommended that students without college-level math credits have completed a secondary-level course in Geometry, Algebra 2, Precalculus, Calculus, or Math for College Statistics with a grade of ‘B’ or higher before taking this course.
This Honors course introduces descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, two-sample inferences, correlation and regression and nonparametric tests. This course is a first course in statistical methods and involves Honors students in projects and development of portfolios. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for degree seeking students. It is recommended that students without college-level math credits have completed a secondary-level course in Geometry, Algebra 2, Precalculus, Calculus, or Math for College Statistics with a grade of ‘B’ or higher before taking this course.
This course is a survey of the elementary aspects of the astronomical universe. Topics include the history and growth of astronomy, instrumentation, solar system, stars, galaxies and cosmology. Star-gazing sessions and planetarium trips are included to identify the prominent constellations and stars. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This course is a survey of the elementary aspects of the astronomical universe. Topics include the history and growth of astronomy, instrumentation, solar system, stars, galaxies and cosmology. Star-gazing sessions and planetarium trips are included to identify the prominent constellations and stars. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This course is a study of the characteristics of living organisms. Unifying concepts such as metabolism, genetics, evolution and cellular organization will be investigated. Designed for non-science majors, this course does not fulfill the credit requirements for biology majors (see BSC 2010C). This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course is a study of the characteristics of living organisms. Unifying concepts such as metabolism, genetics, evolution and cellular organization will be investigated. Designed for non-science majors, this course does not fulfill the credit requirements for biology majors (see BSC 2010C). Honors level content. Permission from Honors Director required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science Requirement for A.A. degree-seeking students.
This course is a study of the characteristics of living organisms with emphasis on man. Unifying concepts such as metabolism, energy utilization and reproduction will be investigated. Laboratory exercises will emphasize basic principles of biology. Designed for non-science majors, this course does not fulfill the credit requirements for biology majors. Lab fee required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
Anatomy and Physiology I - Transfer

BSC 1085 is not offered at Seminole State College of Florida

This course is primarily for science majors or students with a strong biology background. It is a study of the molecular and cellular composition and function of living organisms. Emphasis will be given to structure, chemical metabolism and genetic mechanisms. Laboratory illustrates basic biological principles. Lab fee required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This is a one-semester course for the non-science major designed to meet the General Education requirement. Presumes no chemistry or mathematics background. Basic chemical principles are covered and related to larger topics that may include the chemistry of water and the atmosphere, energy sources, natural and man-made materials and environmental issues. Laboratory exercises during the lecture may be used to complement course material. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This is a one-semester course for the non-science major designed to meet the General Education requirement. Presumes no chemistry or mathematics background. Basic chemical principles are covered and related to larger topics that may include the chemistry of water and the atmosphere, energy sources, natural and man-made materials and environmental issues. Laboratory exercises during the lecture may be used to complement course material. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This is a one-semester course for the non-science major designed to meet the General Education requirement. Presumes no chemistry or mathematics background. Basic chemical principles are covered and related to larger topics that may include the chemistry of water and the atmosphere, energy sources, natural and man-made materials and environmental issues. Laboratory experiments are chosen that support these topics. Lab fee required. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This course serves as the first semester of the two-semester general chemistry sequence. Topics covered include problem-solving, atomic and molecular structure, chemical formulas and nomenclature, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, bonding models, gas laws, solutions and other selected topics. Laboratory experiments are chosen that support these topics. Lab fee required. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This course serves as the first semester of the two-semester general chemistry sequence. Topics covered include problem-solving, atomic and molecular structure, chemical formulas and nomenclature, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, bonding models, gas laws, solutions and other selected topics. Laboratory experiments are chosen that support these topics. Lab fee required. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This course will introduce students to the Earth as a complex and dynamic system. Focus will be on the solid Earth, the oceans, the atmosphere and interactions among these subsystems. Students will learn of the Earth's origin and place within the solar system. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree-seeking students.
This is a three-credit-hour General Education course with no prerequisites. Students will study the impact of human systems on the physical and biological environment as well as discuss possible solutions to today's environmental problems. Topics include ecology, natural resources, energy, pollution, population growth, urbanization and sustainability. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This is a three-credit hour General Education course. Students will study the impact of human systems on the physical and biological environment as well as discuss possible solutions to today's environmental problems. Topics include ecology, natural resources, energy, pollution, population growth, urbanization and sustainability. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This is a four-credit-hour General Education course with no prerequisites. Students will study the impact of human systems on the physical and biological environment as well as discuss possible solutions to today's environmental problems. Topics include ecology, natural resources, energy, pollution, population growth, urbanization and sustainability. The laboratory will give students an analytical learning experience in environmental science, as well as teach them to apply the learned concepts to real world problems and issues. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This course is for non-science majors. Fundamental concepts of physics with application of everyday experiences are covered. Topics include kinematics, mechanics, electricity and magnetism and special topics. This course is designed to give the student a working knowledge of the physical factors in our environment. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This course contains a descriptive and quantitative study of kinematics, mechanics, energy and applications of mechanics. This course meets the requirements for professional and technical students needing an algebra-based physics course. Lab fee required. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This physics course is designed for science, engineering and mathematics majors. Topics studied are kinematics, mechanics and applications of mechanics. Lab fee required. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This honors physics course is designed for science, engineering and mathematics majors. Topics studied are kinematics, mechanics and applications of mechanics. Lab is included. Lab fee required. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.

* POS 2041 or POS 2041H partially satisfies the Civic Literacy requirement. Students entering the Florida College System for the first time in Fall 2022 or later can satisfy the Civic Literacy requirement by passing a course and an assessment.   Refer to the online catalog for assessment options.

In this course basic aspects of the federal government are studied. Emphasis is placed upon content and interpretation of the Constitution, Federalism, the Congress, the Presidency, the federal court system and the citizen's connection to the federal government by means of elections, political parties, interest groups and public opinion. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for A.A. degree seeking students and the Florida state civic literacy requirement per Florida Statues Section 1007.25 for all students.
In this course, basic aspects of the federal government are studied. Emphasis is placed upon content and interpretation of the Constitution, Federalism, the Congress, the Presidency, the federal court system and the citizen's connection to the federal government by means of elections, political parties, interest groups and public opinion. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for A.A. degree seeking students and the Florida state civic literacy requirement per Florida Statues Section 1007.25 for all students.
Total Credits: 60

General Education Core Course. Denotes that a class is a State of Florida General Education Core Course.

Prior to the award of an associate in arts or baccalaureate degree, first-time-in-college students entering a Florida College System institution in the Fall 2015 term and thereafter must complete at least one (1) course from each of the general education subject areas listed in this section. Beginning in the 2022-23 academic year and thereafter, students entering associate in arts, associate in science or associate in applied science, or baccalaureate degree programs must complete at least one (1) course from each of the general education subject areas listed in this section prior to the awarding of their degree. Please refer to this catalog's Graduation Requirements section for specific requirements on the General Education Core Courses.

The State of Florida requires that all students graduating from Seminole State College of Florida and other institutions in the Florida College System (FCS), as well as from any State University System (SUS) institution, fulfill a Civic Literacy Competency requirement prior to submitting an Intent to Graduate form in the term they plan to graduate. Requirements vary based on admit term and program. Please refer to this catalog’s Graduation Requirements section for specific requirements on the Civic Literacy Proficiency Requirement.

Your tuition shouldn’t go against your intuition.

Your pursuit of higher education is admirable. So why struggle with high tuition in the process? Here we make life’s next steps affordable. Whether you’re seeking a university transfer (A.A.) degree, a four-year bachelor’s, an Associate in Science degree or even earning a technical certificate, you’ll find reasonable tuition and great value. And to us, that’s scholarly.

In fact, a full-time college education at Seminole State is more than $10,000 less each year than most state universities.

Go For Less.


Tuition and Fee Comparison*

 Seminole StateUFFSUUCF
Tuition and Fees$3,131$6,380$5,666 $5,954 
Room and Board-0-$10,950$11,592 $11,498 
Books and Supplies$1,000$810$1,000$1,200
Total$4,131$18,140$18,258$18,652

For more information on Seminole State's tuition and fees, please see the current fee schedule.

* Tuition costs are based on the current academic year for in-state students living on campus. Dorm fees, meal plans and book expenses are estimates based on cost of attendance information provided by the State University System of Florida. Lab fees and other fees that may be assessed at the time of registration may be viewed in the College fee schedule. As Seminole State is a commuter college with no residence halls on its campuses, costs for room and board are not calculated.

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