Early Childhood Education Associate in Science

For Spring Term 2022, we are offering in-person, hybrid, remote and online courses.  
For more information, view class types

Traditional face-to-face classes held on campus on set days and times. Currently, masks/cloth face coverings and other precautions are strongly recommended.

They say if you love what you do, you’ll never work a day in your life. Take your love of caring for children and turn into a satisfying career by learning the field’s history, philosophical, political and theoretical practices. With this degree, you’ll be ready to support the development of children from newborn to 8 years of age.

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Getting Started: Spring Term 2022

Sept. 30:  Financial Aid


Jan. 3:  Application


Jan. 10:  Classes Begin

Other Important Dates »

Why Seminole State?

  • Affordable tuition: Earn a state university education at about half the cost.
  • Small class sizes: With classes of 30 or less, you don’t have to learn in an auditorium.
  • Online degree option: Most courses for our A.S. degrees are offered in person and online, so you can study when and where you want. 
  • Seamless transitionMost A.S. graduates earn credits that can be applied to a bachelor's degree at Seminole State or at the University of Central Florida through DirectConnect® to UCF.*
  • Job Placement: According to state data, most Seminole State A.S. programs have placement rates above 90 percent.

*A.S. students who are planning to transfer to bachelor's degree programs should meet with a counselor, advisor or specialist to make sure the required courses are taken and the entry requirements are met.

Early Childhood Education
Type: Associate in Science
Major Code: CHLDD-AS
CIP: 1413121004
Educational Pathway: CHLDD-AS

Program Description

Available Course Course Not Offered Spring 2022
This course provides a study of the techniques used in art, music, storytelling and dramatic activities with young children, birth through age eight, with emphasis on interdisciplinary learning. Students plan, implement and evaluate experiences that will contribute to the creative, motor, affective, perceptual, cognitive and aesthetic development of the young child.
This course describes how children acquire language and literacy and how teachers can design classrooms to promote oral and written language development. The course will stress planning for individual children, including children with special needs and English language learners as well as understanding the importance of the child's family in language and literacy development. Up to 10 hours of field observation is required.
This course examines child development from conception to age eight by considering the complex interaction between heredity and environmental factors. Children's physical, social, emotional and cognitive development are discussed as well as the implications for developmentally appropriate practice. It includes the theories of Erikson, Piaget and Vygotsky. Students will be required to participate in field experience assignments in a child care setting for up to 10 hours.
This course provides students with the opportunity to observe children, to gain experience working with children and to discuss what they see and learn with someone qualified to interpret behavior and to expose students to current knowledge about child development. Students will gain more understanding of the Code of Ethical Conduct and demonstrate the use of this code through their writings and reflections. While in the course, the student will develop a teaching portfolio, participate in professional employment scenarios and be observed in a childcare or public-school setting for the Florida Staff Credential. Students must have departmental approval before registering. This is a capstone course intended for the student to take the final semester. The field experience is composed of 80 clock hours conducted in an early childhood setting. To comply with Florida State Law, Chapter 402.305 2 (a), each prospective student must be fingerprinted and undergo a FDLE Level II background screening. The cost of these procedures is the responsibility of the student. Information received is confidential and is required to determine the eligibility of the prospective student to work with children. Department consent is required prior to registering for this course. Contact the Early Childhood Education Department for additional information about this requirement. Phone: 407 708-2673 or email: childdevelopment@seminolestate.edu.
This course provides child guidance and group management techniques to foster the development of self-esteem, self-control and social skills in young children. Positive reinforcement and problem resolution will be emphasized when discussing child play problems. Students will be required to participate in field experience assignments in an early childhood setting.
This course will explore developmentally appropriate practices for inclusive preschool settings. Participants will develop a framework for planning, implementation, organization and evaluation of activities in content areas such as art, math, science, music, language arts and play. The course will emphasize high-quality, developmentally appropriate practices aligned with state and national standards and guidelines. Students will be required to participate in field experience assignments in a child care setting for up to 10 hours.
Upon completion of this course, students will understand how to guide and encourage learning by ensuring that the environment is rich with materials and equipment that invite active exploration. Various curriculum approaches will be reviewed with a concentration in creating lesson plans and activities that are appropriate for children under the age of eight years of age. Students will develop a framework for planning, implementation, organization and evaluation for activities in content areas such as art, math, science, music, language arts and active play. The course will emphasize intentionality in teaching using high-quality, developmentally appropriate practices aligned with state school readiness standards. Up to 10 hours of observation in a group care setting is required.
This course will serve as a vehicle to deepen student knowledge of infant/toddler development by becoming familiar with play-based curriculum designed to provide caregivers with explicit ideas for creating loving, playful and stimulating experiences for young children from birth through age three. Students will be required to participate in field experience assignments in an infant toddler setting for up to 10 hours.
This course provides a comprehensive overview of the nutrition, health and safety needs of young children. It is designed to give future and current teachers practical and easy-to-understand information that will prepare them to serve diverse young children and their families in the preschool or early elementary school setting.
This course will focus on children with special needs in early childhood settings. Based on a developmental perspective, course content includes the various areas of exceptionality in terms of causes, characteristics and general intervention, strategies for adapting the learning environment, modifying instruction and making curriculum accessible to all children through inclusion of those with special needs. Attention will be given to state and federal legislation, the referral process, community resources and effective ways to work with families. Note: This course was formerly listed as EEX 2010 and is the required course for Early Childhood Education students. This course is not intended for students pursuing K-12.
This course is designed to provide the knowledge and skills needed to meet emergency first aid situations. There will be comprehensive training in recognition, evaluation and handling victims of illness or accidents. Students, after successful completion, will receive an American Heart Association Basic Life Support (BLS) card. Lab fee required.
This course presents developmentally appropriate music and movement experiences for young children. Students will be involved in singing, creating, listening to and learning about making music and encouraging children to move to music. Students will develop an understanding of the importance music plays in the early childhood curriculum and how to incorporate it into the daily routine to accomplish a variety of curriculum goals.
Students will be introduced to the theory of the Montessori method, including evolution, relationship to Piaget, Erikson, Kohlberg, Vygotsky and others, Montessori's definition of sensitive periods of development, the role of teacher as directress, the importance of the prepared environment and the process of normalization will be discussed so that the student will gain an appreciation of the Montessori philosophy and method of teaching.
This course will explore administrative issues relating to leadership in early childhood education, including management styles, staff development and supervision, teacher training, staff collegiality, retention and evaluation as well as collaboration with parents and community. This course meets the director credential requirements for the foundational level.
This course is designed for the early childhood professional to develop basic knowledge, skills and positive dispositions needed to work in partnership with families and other professionals in order to gather data that documents the developmental progression, individual needs and progress toward learning within the classroom. An understanding of goals, benefits of documentation and other effective assessment strategies will be discussed. Up to 10 hours of observation in a childcare or VPK center is required.
This course introduces the teacher candidate to principles of math and science that are necessary for early childhood instruction. Students examine the content necessary to teach mathematical principles such as cardinality and counting, classification and sorting, balance, shapes, and numerical representations. An introduction to the process skills of science are included, enabling students to think scientifically in environmental science, life science and physical science areas. This course may be used as a renewal for Florida Staff Credential.
This methods class provides students with the knowledge of developmentally appropriate social studies and creative expression concepts for children birth through eight and techniques for incorporating them throughout the curriculum. Topics include culture, time, people, places, individual and global, identify sense of community, dramatic play, music, art and creative movement. The course also includes assessment of development as well as designing appropriate accommodations to meet the needs of all children enrolled in the early childhood program.
This course is designed to provide current and future child care administrators the opportunity of satisfying one of the educational requirements for the Advanced Level Child Care and Education Administrator Credential as defined by the state of Florida. It is intended to present the needed skills and information in the following areas: organizational structure and dynamics, ethics and professionalism, leadership personnel policies and relationships and the evaluation and retention involved in staff development.
This three-credit course is designed to satisfy one of the educational requirements for the Advanced Level Child Care and the Educational Administrator Credential as defined by the state of Florida. The goal of this course is to develop and enhance skills in legal and financial planning and on-going monitoring, budgeting and accounting, compensation and benefits, facilities and equipment, financial resources and marketing, technology and record-keeping, legal obligations, tax law, insurance and licensure, regulatory requirements and personnel law.
In this course, guided readings, culturally diverse group activities and guest speakers from a variety of community resource agencies will broaden students' horizons regarding the diverse characteristics that make up a family. Students will explore how a child's development and learning is influenced by the family and the community where they live. The student will design and implement family involvement activities following research-based best practices. Community field experiences are integrated into the course (up to 10 hours).
This is a course in the process of expository writing. Students will read essays and compose papers that are unified, organized, logically developed and supported, clearly stated and well-focused. Research techniques are introduced and incorporated into at least one composition. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Students must pass the core assignments with a grade of "C" or higher. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Communications requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This is an introductory course which surveys the field of psychology and basic principles and concepts utilized to understand human behavior. The major areas of study include development, learning, perception, motivation, emotions, personality, abnormal behavior, psychotherapy and testing measurements. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Some sections of PSY 2012 have service-learning components. Please refer to class notes in schedule of classes for details. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for AA degree seeking students.

Choose one course from the following:

3 Credits
Discussions of the moral problems of contemporary society such as abortion, the sexual revolution, war, violence, aging, civil disobedience, modern medical practices and other issues take place in this course. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to introduce the student to the contributions of women in the humanities. It will examine their contributions to literature, art and music from the Classical period to the present day. Students will learn how gender has influenced production of the arts throughout these periods. Examining notions of masculinity and femininity will be a key component of the course and their various representations in art, literature and music will be a major subject of study. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.

Choose one course from the following list:

3 Credits
This course is designed to study the changing culture of our nation. Issues of race, ethnicity, gender, class, nationality and globalism will be explored. This course is also designed to provide information and strategies for living and working in a pluralistic, multi-cultural society. Values and ethics of diversity and commonality will be emphasized. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is a historical and comparative study of courtship, mate selection, engagement, marriage, husband-wife relationships and child-rearing in the United States. Emphasis is placed upon the changing contemporary family with respect to social and economic status, sex, sources of marital conflict and social values. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is a study of the fundamental topics in advanced algebra with emphasis on applications, the understanding of the function concept and manipulative skills. Major topics include operations on algebraic expressions and complex numbers, solving polynomial equations and inequalities, absolute value equations and inequalities and rational equations and inequalities, applications, functions, exponents and logarithms, graphs of polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions and systems of equations and inequalities. The use of graphing calculators will be incorporated throughout the course. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This is a course in precalculus algebra intended for the student who is planning to take trigonometry and the calculus sequence. Major topics include rational and other algebraic functions and their graphs, piecewise-defined functions, a review of exponential and logarithmic functions, conic sections, matrices and determinants, sequences and series, Mathematical Induction, the Binomial Theorem and applications. The use of graphing calculators will be incorporated throughout the course. This course may be taken concurrently with MAC 1114, Trigonometry.
This is a course in precalculus algebra and trigonometry intended for the student who is planning to take the calculus sequence. This course condenses into a five-credit hour format all topics of Precalculus Algebra (MAC 1140) and Trigonometry (MAC 1114). Algebra topics include the following: polynomial, rational and other algebraic functions and their graphs, piecewise-defined functions, a review of exponential and logarithmic functions, conic sections, matrices and determinants, sequences and series, Mathematical Induction, the Binomial Theorem and applications. Trigonometry topics include angular measure, right triangle and unit circle trigonometry, trigonometric (circular) and inverse trigonometric functions and their graphs, trigonometric identities, conditional trigonometric equations, solution of right and oblique triangles, vectors, complex numbers in trigonometric form, applications, polar coordinates and graphs and parametric equations and graphs. The use of graphing calculators will be incorporated throughout the course. Successful completion of a high school course containing trigonometric topics and/or concepts is recommended.
This course is a study of Differential and Integral Calculus of algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions with applications to business analysis. It is designed to provide the student of business and social sciences a course in applied calculus. This course is not intended for the student who is required to complete the calculus series.
This is a first course in analytic geometry and the theory and application of calculus. Selected topics include a review of functions, limits and continuity, the derivative, differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions and their inverses, the Mean Value and Intermediate Value Theorems, extrema and graph sketching, area and the definite integral, anti-differentiation and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and integration of transcendental functions and their inverses. A graphing calculator will be used throughout the course. Students should ask the instructor which calculator will be used. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This is a first course in analytic geometry and the theory and application of calculus. Selected topics include a review of functions, limits and continuity, the derivative, differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions and their inverses, the Mean Value and Intermediate Value Theorems, extrema and graph sketching, area and the definite integral, anti-differentiation and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and integration of transcendental functions and their inverses. The graphing calculator will be used throughout the course. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course is a continuation of MAC 2311. Selected topics include conics, translation and rotation of axes, techniques of integration, arc length and other applications of the definite integral, polar coordinates, indeterminate forms and improper integrals, infinite sequences and series and Taylor's Formula. A graphing calculator will be used throughout the course. Students should ask the instructor which calculator will be used.
The following topics will be covered in this course: sets and Venn diagrams, logic, inductive and deductive reasoning, counting principles, permutations and combinations, probability, descriptive statistics and geometry. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course provides an opportunity for students to see mathematics used in ways not seen in traditional mathematics courses. Topics are selected from the following: financial mathematics, numbers and number systems, elementary number theory and graph theory. Additional topics may be included at the discretion of the instructor. History of mathematics, critical thinking skills, problem-solving techniques and the appropriate use of technology will be used throughout the course. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course introduces descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, two-sample inferences, correlation and regression and nonparametric tests. This course is a first course in statistical methods for those students entering a science or business-related field. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This Honors course introduces descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, two-sample inferences, correlation and regression and nonparametric tests. This course is a first course in statistical methods and involves Honors students in projects and development of portfolios. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course is intended to familiarize students with the basic biology of yeast and fungi that are of medical importance. A survey of common mycotic infections and mycotoxicosis is presented. It includes basic hands-on laboratory exercises involving the microscopic examination of samples and isolates, collecting samples for culturing yeast and fungi, preparation, inoculation and incubation of media, identification of yeast and fungal morphotypes (both microscopic and on culture media) using dichotomous or pictographic schemes, field studies and laboratory experimentations.
This course is a study of the characteristics of living organisms. Unifying concepts such as metabolism, genetics, evolution and cellular organization will be investigated. Designed for non-science majors, this course does not fulfill the credit requirements for biology majors (see BSC 2010C). This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course is a study of the characteristics of living organisms with emphasis on man. Unifying concepts such as metabolism, energy utilization and reproduction will be investigated. Laboratory exercises will emphasize basic principles of biology. Designed for non-science majors, this course does not fulfill the credit requirements for biology majors. Lab fee required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course is a study of the characteristics of living organisms. Unifying concepts such as metabolism, genetics, evolution and cellular organization will be investigated. Designed for non-science majors, this course does not fulfill the credit requirements for biology majors (see BSC 2010C). Honors level content. Permission from Honors Director required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science Requirement for A.A. degree-seeking students.
This course provides an introduction to scientific inquiry in relationship to the human body, its systems and basic functions with emphasis on homeostatic mechanisms. The structure and function of cells, tissues and organ systems will be investigated. Designed for non-science majors. This course does not fulfill the credit requirements for Biology majors.
This course is a study of interactions between living things and their biotic and abiotic environments with emphasis on the influence of humankind on natural systems and built environments. Designed for non-science majors, this course does not fulfill the credit requirements for biology majors.
This course is a study of plant and animal interactions in their natural environment and the influence of man on these natural systems. Active learning components may include outdoor activities and/or field trips. Designed for non-majors. Honors level content. Permission of the Honors director is required.
This course is a primer to prepare students to succeed in a biology or anatomy and physiology courses. The course focuses on developing and improving study skills and emphasizes personal accountability. Course content includes a review of basic math, biology, chemistry and cells and introduces anatomical terminology and body basics. This course cannot be used as a substitute for BSC 2010C.
Anatomy and Physiology I - Transfer
Students will be introduced to the most common lifestyle on earth: parasitism! This course will be a broad survey of parasites of humans, domestic and wild animals. Major topics will include ecological and evolutionary aspects of parasite-host interactions with an emphasis on life cycles, anatomy and physiology of parasites and immunological, pathological and clinical responses of hosts to parasitic infection. The treatment and control of parasites will also be discussed.
This course is primarily for science majors or students with a strong biology background. It is a study of the molecular and cellular composition and function of living organisms. Emphasis will be given to structure, chemical metabolism and genetic mechanisms. Laboratory illustrates basic biological principles. Lab fee required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course is a survey of the elementary aspects of the astronomical universe. Topics include the history and growth of astronomy, instrumentation, solar system, stars, galaxies and cosmology. Star-gazing sessions and planetarium trips are included to identify the prominent constellations and stars. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course is a survey of the elementary aspects of the astronomical universe. Topics include the history and growth of astronomy, instrumentation, solar system, stars, galaxies and cosmology. Star-gazing sessions and planetarium trips are included to identify the prominent constellations and stars. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course will introduce students to the Earth as a complex and dynamic system. Focus will be on the solid Earth, the oceans, the atmosphere and interactions among these subsystems. Students will learn of the Earth's origin and place within the solar system. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree-seeking students.
This is a three-credit-hour General Education course with no prerequisites. Students will study the impact of human systems on the physical and biological environment as well as discuss possible solutions to today's environmental problems. Topics include ecology, natural resources, energy, pollution, population growth, urbanization and sustainability. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This is a four-credit-hour General Education course with no prerequisites. Students will study the impact of human systems on the physical and biological environment as well as discuss possible solutions to today's environmental problems. Topics include ecology, natural resources, energy, pollution, population growth, urbanization and sustainability. The laboratory will give students an analytical learning experience in environmental science, as well as teach them to apply the learned concepts to real world problems and issues. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This is a three-credit hour General Education course. Students will study the impact of human systems on the physical and biological environment as well as discuss possible solutions to today's environmental problems. Topics include ecology, natural resources, energy, pollution, population growth, urbanization and sustainability. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This beginning course is designed to give the student a basic understanding of Earth. Emphasis is on Earth materials, geologic hazards, the water cycle and plate tectonics. This course satisfies a natural science requirement and provides background knowledge for further courses in Earth sciences.
This course provides an introduction to the fossil record of life on Earth. Focus will be on modes of preservation, identification of fossil material, evolution and the fossil record of invertebrate and vertebrate animals. A field trip may be required.
This course provides a survey of introductory ideas in physical geology, including Earth materials, geologic hazards, plate tectonics, the water cycle and surficial landforms. Laboratory work will consist of identification of minerals and rock specimens, interpretation of stratigraphic units and work with topographic, physiographic and geologic maps and imagery. Field trips may be required. Lab fee required.
This beginning course is designed to acquaint the student with the elementary physical, chemical, biological and geological characteristics of the world ocean system. Emphasis is on Florida and its unique relationship with the ocean environment.
This beginning course is designed to acquaint the student with the oceans, Earth's most dominant feature and their importance to all planetary systems. Focus will be on their physical, chemical, biological and geological characteristics. Emphasis is on Florida and its unique relationship with the ocean environment. Field trips may be included.
This honors level introductory course is designed to acquaint students with the oceans, Earth's most dominant feature and their importance to all planetary systems. Focus will be on their physical, chemical, biological and geological characteristics. Emphasis is on Florida and its unique relationship with the ocean environment. Field trips may be included. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director.
This beginning course is designed to acquaint students with the elementary characteristics of the atmosphere. Students with an interest in aviation would especially benefit from many units taught in the course. Units include a study of atmospheric structure, heat budget, winds, air pollution, local and regional weather forecasting and more. Weather products are downloaded from the Internet and used throughout the course. Optional field trips included.
This beginning course is designed to acquaint students with the elementary characteristics of the atmosphere. Students with an interest in aviation would especially benefit from many units taught in the course. Units include a study of atmospheric structure, heat budget, winds, air pollution, local and regional weather forecasting and more. Weather products are downloaded from the Internet and used throughout the course. Laboratory work will focus on the extracting of information from online weather resources and the use of other weather-related tools. Optional field trips included. Lab fee required.
This is a one-semester course for the non-science major designed to meet the General Education requirement for the A.A. degree. Presumes no chemistry or mathematics background. Basic chemical principles are covered and related to larger topics that may include the chemistry of water and the atmosphere, energy sources, natural and man-made materials and environmental issues. Laboratory exercises during the lecture may be used to complement course material. Lab fee required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This is a one-semester course for the non-science major designed to meet the General Education requirement for the A.A. degree. Presumes no chemistry or mathematics background. Basic chemical principles are covered and related to larger topics that may include the chemistry of water and the atmosphere, energy sources, natural and man-made materials and environmental issues. Laboratory experiments are chosen that support these topics. Lab fee required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This is a one-semester course for the non-science major designed to meet the General Education requirement for the A.A. degree. Presumes no chemistry or mathematics background. Basic chemical principles are covered and related to larger topics that may include the chemistry of water and the atmosphere, energy sources, natural and man-made materials and environmental issues. Laboratory exercises during the lecture may be used to complement course material. Lab fee required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This is a one-semester course designed to introduce the principles of chemistry to nursing and allied health students. It assumes no prior chemistry background. The course can also be used as a preparation for CHM 2045C. Topics will span general, organic and biological chemistry and cover problem-solving, atomic and molecular structure, chemical reactions, bonding, gas laws, radioactivity, an introduction to organic chemistry, carbohydrates, acids/bases and other selected topics. Lab fee required.
This course serves as the first semester of the two-semester general chemistry sequence. Topics covered include problem-solving, atomic and molecular structure, chemical formulas and nomenclature, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, bonding models, gas laws, solutions and other selected topics. Laboratory experiments are chosen that support these topics. Lab fee required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course serves as the first semester of the two-semester general chemistry sequence. Topics covered include problem-solving, atomic and molecular structure, chemical formulas and nomenclature, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, bonding models, gas laws, solutions and other selected topics. Laboratory experiments are chosen that support these topics. Lab fee required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course introduces students to the quantitative and qualitative descriptions of the fundamental physical principles used in construction and architectural design. Topics include vectors, forces, static equilibrium of point particles and rigid bodies, torque, center of gravity and moment of inertia, stress-strain relationships, torsion and shear stress, as well as some basic electrical principles, such as Ohm's Law, power and resistor circuits. Applications to construction and design will be discussed. This course must be completed with a grade of "C" or higher.
This course is for non-science majors. Fundamental concepts of physics with application of everyday experiences are covered. Topics include kinematics, mechanics, electricity and magnetism and special topics. This course is designed to give the student a working knowledge of the physical factors in our environment. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course contains a descriptive and quantitative study of kinematics, mechanics, energy and applications of mechanics. This course meets the requirements for professional and technical students needing an algebra-based physics course. Lab fee required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This physics course is designed for science, engineering and mathematics majors. Topics studied are kinematics, mechanics and applications of mechanics. Lab fee required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This honors physics course is designed for science, engineering and mathematics majors. Topics studied are kinematics, mechanics and applications of mechanics. Lab is included. Lab fee required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course is an overview of local, regional and global sustainability with the goal of helping students recognize and engage with the interplay between environmental, socio-cultural and economic forces that affect our ability to achieve sustainability. Topics will include the science of climate change, pollution, environmental ethics and politics, renewable energy and sustainability in the built environment.
Total Credits: 60

Your tuition shouldn’t go against your intuition.

Your pursuit of higher education is admirable. So why struggle with high tuition in the process? Here we make life’s next steps affordable. Whether you’re seeking a university transfer (A.A.) degree, a four-year bachelor’s, an Associate in Science degree or even earning a technical certificate, you’ll find reasonable tuition and great value. And to us, that’s scholarly.

In fact, a full-time college education at Seminole State is more than $10,000 less each year than most state universities.

Go For Less.


Tuition and Fee Comparison*

 Seminole StateUFFSUUCF
Tuition and Fees$3,131$6,380$6,538$6,379
Room and Board-0-$10,400$11,472$10,300
Books and Supplies$1,000$810$1,000$1,200
Total$4,131$17,590$19,010$17,879

For more information on Seminole State's tuition and fees, please see the 2021-22 fee schedule.

* Tuition costs are based on Fall 2021 and Spring 2022 terms, with 15 credit hours per term for in-state students. Dorm fees, meal plans and book expenses are estimates based on information provided on each university's website. Lab fees and other fees that may be assessed at the time of registration may be viewed in the College fee schedule. As Seminole State is a commuter college with no residence halls on its campuses, costs for room and board are not calculated.

Profession

Early education professionals play a critical role in the growth and development of the children they serve. In this challenging, yet rewarding role, they ensure children enjoy age-appropriate academic programs and quality enrichment in a caring, nurturing and safe learning environment.

Job Outlook

Due to state-mandated adjustments in student-teacher ratios and increases in enrollment, employment in this field is expected to grow by 25 percent (faster than average) through 2020 (Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics).

Program Note

Seminole State’s Associate in Science (A.S.) degrees are designed to prepare graduates for immediate entry into their chosen career field and/or transfer into certain baccalaureate programs. Students planning to transfer to a college or university should consult with an academic advisor to ensure completion of all entry requirements for the baccalaureate program of their choice.

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