Industrial Technology Management Associate in Science

You’re already in the field you love and your job is rewarding, but you’re ready to take the next step and advance your career. This A.S. degree will give you the credentials, along with skills in project planning, computer applications and decision-making to step up to the role of leader.

Related Programs

Getting Started: Spring 2023

Sept. 29:  Financial Aid


Jan. 3:  Application


Jan. 9:  Classes Begin

Other Important Dates »

Why Seminole State?

  • Affordable tuition: Earn a state university education at about half the cost.
  • Small class sizes: With classes of 30 or less, you don’t have to learn in an auditorium.
  • Online degree option: Most courses for our A.S. degrees are offered in person and online, so you can study when and where you want. 
  • Seamless transitionMost A.S. graduates earn credits that can be applied to a bachelor's degree at Seminole State or at the University of Central Florida through DirectConnect® to UCF.*
  • Job Placement: According to state data, most Seminole State A.S. programs have placement rates above 90 percent.

*A.S. students who are planning to transfer to bachelor's degree programs should meet with a counselor, advisor or specialist to make sure the required courses are taken and the entry requirements are met.

Additional Information

  • Adam Stark, PhD
    Dean, Center for Computer and Engineering Technology
    407.708.2852
    Sanford/Lake Mary Campus, V-102
Industrial Technology Management
Type: Associate in Science
Major Code: INDMGT-AS
CIP: 1652020501

Program Description

Available Course Course Not Offered Spring 2023
This course provides an overview of the theory and practice of managing any project in any organization. The fundamental building blocks of project management are addressed, including project planning, organizing, team building and effective control mechanisms. Students will be introduced to entrepreneurship and its role in corporate projects. Students gain a solid understanding and foundation to successfully manage each phase of the project life cycle, work within organizational and cost constraints, set goals lined directly to stakeholder needs and utilize proven management tools to complete the project on time and within budget. Students apply the essential concepts, processes and techniques that are used in the management of large scale governmental or commercial programs. The key management aspects and proven techniques that differentiate project management from other types of management are fully addressed.
Managing the human elements of project management is as challenging as mastering the technical aspects. Innovative approaches are employed to successfully motivate, communicate, negotiate and resolve conflicts among the team members and stakeholders. In this course, students develop an understanding of the individual, the group and the project team. Proven techniques to make conflict a constructive rather than a destructive experience are discovered. Students develop effective communication, negotiation and conflict resolution skills to successfully lead both domestic and global projects.
Making business and entrepreneurial decisions requires leadership and an in-depth knowledge of finance and engineering economics. This comprehensive course is divided into three parts. Part I is the study of financial concepts and introduces record keeping, financial statements and the accounting equation. Part II is the financial analysis and time value of money and focuses on the traditional approaches of interest calculations, applications of time value of money and project analysis and justification. Part III is financial decision-making and looks at the decision-making tools that complement time value of money analysis like breakeven, ROI, IRR and NVP of cash flows.
The focus of this course is to use the tools and techniques of project planning, scheduling and allocating resources. Students design work breakdown structures, identify work packages, allocate resources and develop project schedules using standard networking techniques. Students are introduced to techniques for estimating, forecasting, budget monitoring, controlling and reporting project costs. Students apply modern project management concepts and tools to real world projects through the use of carefully selected case studies and project simulations. Students will use project management software for creating schedules.
Risk management is the systematic process of identifying, analyzing, evaluating and controlling project risks. An in-depth introduction to the analysis of risk management methodologies from both the strategic and tactical aspects will be addressed. Students will be introduced to both qualitative and quantitative risk analyses, including strategies for proactive risk aversion and reactive risk response. Students learn how a comprehensive risk management approach can enable a project team to proactively manage issues that adversely impact the successful control and completion of a project.
This is an introductory course in computer applications that focuses on the effective use of word processing, spreadsheet, database and presentation software programs. Students will gain a fundamental knowledge of Microsoft Office 365 and learn skills that have practical applications in real world business situations. This course utilizes lectures and hands-on computer exercises. Lab fee required.
This is an advanced course in computer applications that focuses on the advanced use of word processing, spreadsheet, database and presentation software programs. Students will gain advanced knowledge of Microsoft Office 365 and have the necessary skills to solve real world business problems. This course utilizes lectures and hands-on computer exercises. Lab fee required.

Option 1: Students eligible for the articulated credit after completion of a state approved postsecondary adult certificate or apprenticeship program at a state technical center or Florida state college in an industrial program. Pilot licenses are also eligible for the articulated credit.

24 Credits
This course is an introduction to the techniques of drawing for three-dimensional spatial relationships, visualization, sketching and graphical presentation. Engineering drawing, descriptive geometry and graphical solution techniques using both manual and computer methods will be emphasized. Lab fee required.

Choose one of the following:

3 Credits
This course involves the practical uses of applied mathematics in the areas of engineering technology, design and construction. Trigonometric functions are covered as well as law of sines, law of cosines and basic vector mechanics.
College Algebra Gen Ed Core
3
Credits
This course is a study of the fundamental topics in advanced algebra with emphasis on applications, the understanding of the function concept and manipulative skills. Major topics include operations on algebraic expressions and complex numbers, solving polynomial equations and inequalities, absolute value equations and inequalities and rational equations and inequalities, applications, functions, exponents and logarithms, graphs of polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions and systems of equations and inequalities. The use of graphing calculators will be incorporated throughout the course. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for degree seeking students.
This course is a calculus preparatory course in trigonometry with emphasis upon functions. The topics include angular measure, right triangle and unit circle trigonometry, trigonometric (circular) and inverse trigonometric functions and their graphs, trigonometric identities, conditional trigonometric equations, solution of right and oblique triangles, vectors, complex numbers in trigonometric form, applications, polar coordinates and graphs and parametric equations and graphs. The use of graphing calculators will be incorporated throughout the course.
This is a course in precalculus algebra intended for the student who is planning to take trigonometry and the calculus sequence. Major topics include rational and other algebraic functions and their graphs, piecewise-defined functions, a review of exponential and logarithmic functions, conic sections, matrices and determinants, sequences and series, Mathematical Induction, the Binomial Theorem and applications. The use of graphing calculators will be incorporated throughout the course. This course may be taken concurrently with MAC 1114, Trigonometry.
This is a course in precalculus algebra and trigonometry intended for the student who is planning to take the calculus sequence. This course condenses into a five-credit hour format all topics of Precalculus Algebra (MAC 1140) and Trigonometry (MAC 1114). Algebra topics include the following: polynomial, rational and other algebraic functions and their graphs, piecewise-defined functions, a review of exponential and logarithmic functions, conic sections, matrices and determinants, sequences and series, Mathematical Induction, the Binomial Theorem and applications. Trigonometry topics include angular measure, right triangle and unit circle trigonometry, trigonometric (circular) and inverse trigonometric functions and their graphs, trigonometric identities, conditional trigonometric equations, solution of right and oblique triangles, vectors, complex numbers in trigonometric form, applications, polar coordinates and graphs and parametric equations and graphs. The use of graphing calculators will be incorporated throughout the course. Successful completion of a high school course containing trigonometric topics and/or concepts is recommended.
This course is a study of Differential and Integral Calculus of algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions with applications to business analysis. It is designed to provide the student of business and social sciences a course in applied calculus. This course is not intended for the student who is required to complete the calculus series.
This is a first course in analytic geometry and the theory and application of calculus. Selected topics include a review of functions, limits and continuity, the derivative, differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions and their inverses, the Mean Value and Intermediate Value Theorems, extrema and graph sketching, area and the definite integral, anti-differentiation and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and integration of transcendental functions and their inverses. A graphing calculator will be used throughout the course. Students should ask the instructor which calculator will be used. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for degree seeking students.
This is a first course in analytic geometry and the theory and application of calculus. Selected topics include a review of functions, limits and continuity, the derivative, differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions and their inverses, the Mean Value and Intermediate Value Theorems, extrema and graph sketching, area and the definite integral, anti-differentiation and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and integration of transcendental functions and their inverses. The graphing calculator will be used throughout the course. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for degree seeking students.
This course is a continuation of MAC 2311. Selected topics include conics, translation and rotation of axes, techniques of integration, arc length and other applications of the definite integral, polar coordinates, indeterminate forms and improper integrals, infinite sequences and series and Taylor's Formula. A graphing calculator will be used throughout the course. Students should ask the instructor which calculator will be used.
3
Credits
The following topics will be covered in this course: sets and Venn diagrams, logic, inductive and deductive reasoning, counting principles, permutations and combinations, probability, descriptive statistics and geometry. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for degree seeking students. It is recommended that students without college-level math credits have completed a secondary-level course in Geometry, Algebra 2, Precalculus, Calculus, or Math for College Liberal Arts with a grade of ‘B’ or higher before taking this course.
This course provides an opportunity for students to see mathematics used in ways not seen in traditional mathematics courses. Topics are selected from the following: financial mathematics, numbers and number systems, elementary number theory and graph theory. Additional topics may be included at the discretion of the instructor. History of mathematics, critical thinking skills, problem-solving techniques and the appropriate use of technology will be used throughout the course. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for degree seeking students. It is recommended that students without college-level math credits have completed a secondary-level course in Geometry, Algebra 2, Precalculus, Calculus, or Math for College Liberal Arts with a grade of ‘B’ or higher before taking this course.
This course introduces descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, two-sample inferences, correlation and regression and nonparametric tests. This course is a first course in statistical methods for those students entering a science or business-related field. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for degree seeking students. It is recommended that students without college-level math credits have completed a secondary-level course in Geometry, Algebra 2, Precalculus, Calculus, or Math for College Statistics with a grade of ‘B’ or higher before taking this course.
This Honors course introduces descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, two-sample inferences, correlation and regression and nonparametric tests. This course is a first course in statistical methods and involves Honors students in projects and development of portfolios. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for degree seeking students. It is recommended that students without college-level math credits have completed a secondary-level course in Geometry, Algebra 2, Precalculus, Calculus, or Math for College Statistics with a grade of ‘B’ or higher before taking this course.

19 credit hours from the following programs (6 of the 19 credits must be 2000 level);

  • Architectural Engineering Technology
  • Computer Aided Drafting and Design
  • Construction
  • Digital Media
  • Engineering Technology
  • Information Technology
English I Gen Ed Core
3
Credits
This is a course in the process of expository writing. Students will read essays and compose papers that are unified, organized, logically developed and supported, clearly stated and well-focused. Research techniques are introduced and incorporated into at least one composition. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Students must pass the core assignments with a grade of "C" or higher. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Communications requirement for degree seeking students.
Art Appreciation Gen Ed Core
3
Credits
This course introduces students to art from a variety of cultures and historical contexts. Topics include major art movements, varieties of materials and aesthetic theories. Coursework covers formal terms, elements and principles common to the study of art and architecture. The course stresses the relationship of design principles to various art forms including, but not limited to, sculpture, painting and architecture. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and analyze a variety of artistic styles, periods and media and students will have an increased vocabulary of art terminology. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for degree seeking students.
This humanities course is designed to introduce students to the critical study of human culture and its varied expressions across time. Students will employ interdisciplinary methods of analysis through engagement with diverse cultural artifacts in order to develop a foundational understanding of the human experience and its connection to culture. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for degree seeking students.
This humanities course is designed to introduce students to the critical study of human culture and its varied expressions across time. Students will employ interdisciplinary methods of analysis through engagement with diverse cultural artifacts in order to develop a foundational understanding of the human experience and its connection to culture. This course partially satisfies the writing requirements of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities for degree seeking students.
This course is designed to further student understanding of the concepts and applications of analytical and theoretical approaches to literature. Students will employ critical thinking in their interrogation of the texts. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for degree seeking students.
3
Credits
Open to all students, this course is designed for the musical layman and is a survey course devoted to music in world civilization. Included is a study of the music relating to the background of the life and other arts of the times. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for degree seeking students.
This course is designed for the musical layman and is a survey course devoted to music in world civilization. Included is a study of the music relating to the background of the life and other arts of the times. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for degree-seeking students. Honors level content. Permission from Honors Director required.
This course covers fundamental philosophical questions of the human condition including: discussions of existence, identity, ethics, culture, free will, personhood, politics, distributive justice, and much more. Students engage in deep critical thought, analysis of philosophical perspectives including their own, and ultimately gain perspective on how philosophy manifests itself in every aspect of our lived experience. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement.
This course covers fundamental philosophical questions of the human condition including: discussions of existence, identity, ethics, culture, free will, personhood, politics, distributive justice, and much more. Students engage in deep critical thought, analysis of philosophical perspectives including their own, and ultimately gain perspective on how philosophy manifests itself in every aspect of our lived experience. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement.
This course surveys the art of theatre. Students will learn about the process of creating theatre through study of the production process and the many artists who participate in the creation of theatre. Through videos and attendance at live theatre, students will also learn the various forms of theatre, such as tragedy and comedy and various modes of presentation, both presentational and representational. Students will also be introduced to theatre's historic roots and its diversity as expressed in various cultures throughout the globe. This course contains a reading and writing component. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B. E. 6A-10.030. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for degree seeking students.
College Algebra Gen Ed Core
3
Credits
This course is a study of the fundamental topics in advanced algebra with emphasis on applications, the understanding of the function concept and manipulative skills. Major topics include operations on algebraic expressions and complex numbers, solving polynomial equations and inequalities, absolute value equations and inequalities and rational equations and inequalities, applications, functions, exponents and logarithms, graphs of polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions and systems of equations and inequalities. The use of graphing calculators will be incorporated throughout the course. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for degree seeking students.
This is a first course in analytic geometry and the theory and application of calculus. Selected topics include a review of functions, limits and continuity, the derivative, differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions and their inverses, the Mean Value and Intermediate Value Theorems, extrema and graph sketching, area and the definite integral, anti-differentiation and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and integration of transcendental functions and their inverses. A graphing calculator will be used throughout the course. Students should ask the instructor which calculator will be used. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for degree seeking students.
This is a first course in analytic geometry and the theory and application of calculus. Selected topics include a review of functions, limits and continuity, the derivative, differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions and their inverses, the Mean Value and Intermediate Value Theorems, extrema and graph sketching, area and the definite integral, anti-differentiation and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and integration of transcendental functions and their inverses. The graphing calculator will be used throughout the course. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for degree seeking students.
3
Credits
The following topics will be covered in this course: sets and Venn diagrams, logic, inductive and deductive reasoning, counting principles, permutations and combinations, probability, descriptive statistics and geometry. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for degree seeking students. It is recommended that students without college-level math credits have completed a secondary-level course in Geometry, Algebra 2, Precalculus, Calculus, or Math for College Liberal Arts with a grade of ‘B’ or higher before taking this course.
This course provides an opportunity for students to see mathematics used in ways not seen in traditional mathematics courses. Topics are selected from the following: financial mathematics, numbers and number systems, elementary number theory and graph theory. Additional topics may be included at the discretion of the instructor. History of mathematics, critical thinking skills, problem-solving techniques and the appropriate use of technology will be used throughout the course. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for degree seeking students. It is recommended that students without college-level math credits have completed a secondary-level course in Geometry, Algebra 2, Precalculus, Calculus, or Math for College Liberal Arts with a grade of ‘B’ or higher before taking this course.
This course introduces descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, two-sample inferences, correlation and regression and nonparametric tests. This course is a first course in statistical methods for those students entering a science or business-related field. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for degree seeking students. It is recommended that students without college-level math credits have completed a secondary-level course in Geometry, Algebra 2, Precalculus, Calculus, or Math for College Statistics with a grade of ‘B’ or higher before taking this course.
This Honors course introduces descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, two-sample inferences, correlation and regression and nonparametric tests. This course is a first course in statistical methods and involves Honors students in projects and development of portfolios. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for degree seeking students. It is recommended that students without college-level math credits have completed a secondary-level course in Geometry, Algebra 2, Precalculus, Calculus, or Math for College Statistics with a grade of ‘B’ or higher before taking this course.
This course is a survey of the elementary aspects of the astronomical universe. Topics include the history and growth of astronomy, instrumentation, solar system, stars, galaxies and cosmology. Star-gazing sessions and planetarium trips are included to identify the prominent constellations and stars. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This course is a survey of the elementary aspects of the astronomical universe. Topics include the history and growth of astronomy, instrumentation, solar system, stars, galaxies and cosmology. Star-gazing sessions and planetarium trips are included to identify the prominent constellations and stars. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
3
Credits
This course is a study of the characteristics of living organisms. Unifying concepts such as metabolism, genetics, evolution and cellular organization will be investigated. Designed for non-science majors, this course does not fulfill the credit requirements for biology majors (see BSC 2010C). This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course is a study of the characteristics of living organisms. Unifying concepts such as metabolism, genetics, evolution and cellular organization will be investigated. Designed for non-science majors, this course does not fulfill the credit requirements for biology majors (see BSC 2010C). Honors level content. Permission from Honors Director required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science Requirement for A.A. degree-seeking students.
This course is a study of the characteristics of living organisms with emphasis on man. Unifying concepts such as metabolism, energy utilization and reproduction will be investigated. Laboratory exercises will emphasize basic principles of biology. Designed for non-science majors, this course does not fulfill the credit requirements for biology majors. Lab fee required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
Anatomy and Physiology I - Transfer

BSC 1085 is not offered at Seminole State College of Florida

4
Credits
This course is primarily for science majors or students with a strong biology background. It is a study of the molecular and cellular composition and function of living organisms. Emphasis will be given to structure, chemical metabolism and genetic mechanisms. Laboratory illustrates basic biological principles. Lab fee required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This is a one-semester course for the non-science major designed to meet the General Education requirement. Presumes no chemistry or mathematics background. Basic chemical principles are covered and related to larger topics that may include the chemistry of water and the atmosphere, energy sources, natural and man-made materials and environmental issues. Laboratory exercises during the lecture may be used to complement course material. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This is a one-semester course for the non-science major designed to meet the General Education requirement. Presumes no chemistry or mathematics background. Basic chemical principles are covered and related to larger topics that may include the chemistry of water and the atmosphere, energy sources, natural and man-made materials and environmental issues. Laboratory exercises during the lecture may be used to complement course material. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This is a one-semester course for the non-science major designed to meet the General Education requirement. Presumes no chemistry or mathematics background. Basic chemical principles are covered and related to larger topics that may include the chemistry of water and the atmosphere, energy sources, natural and man-made materials and environmental issues. Laboratory experiments are chosen that support these topics. Lab fee required. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This course serves as the first semester of the two-semester general chemistry sequence. Topics covered include problem-solving, atomic and molecular structure, chemical formulas and nomenclature, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, bonding models, gas laws, solutions and other selected topics. Laboratory experiments are chosen that support these topics. Lab fee required. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This course serves as the first semester of the two-semester general chemistry sequence. Topics covered include problem-solving, atomic and molecular structure, chemical formulas and nomenclature, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, bonding models, gas laws, solutions and other selected topics. Laboratory experiments are chosen that support these topics. Lab fee required. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This course will introduce students to the Earth as a complex and dynamic system. Focus will be on the solid Earth, the oceans, the atmosphere and interactions among these subsystems. Students will learn of the Earth's origin and place within the solar system. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree-seeking students.
This is a three-credit-hour General Education course with no prerequisites. Students will study the impact of human systems on the physical and biological environment as well as discuss possible solutions to today's environmental problems. Topics include ecology, natural resources, energy, pollution, population growth, urbanization and sustainability. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This is a three-credit hour General Education course. Students will study the impact of human systems on the physical and biological environment as well as discuss possible solutions to today's environmental problems. Topics include ecology, natural resources, energy, pollution, population growth, urbanization and sustainability. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This is a four-credit-hour General Education course with no prerequisites. Students will study the impact of human systems on the physical and biological environment as well as discuss possible solutions to today's environmental problems. Topics include ecology, natural resources, energy, pollution, population growth, urbanization and sustainability. The laboratory will give students an analytical learning experience in environmental science, as well as teach them to apply the learned concepts to real world problems and issues. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This course is for non-science majors. Fundamental concepts of physics with application of everyday experiences are covered. Topics include kinematics, mechanics, electricity and magnetism and special topics. This course is designed to give the student a working knowledge of the physical factors in our environment. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
4
Credits
This course contains a descriptive and quantitative study of kinematics, mechanics, energy and applications of mechanics. This course meets the requirements for professional and technical students needing an algebra-based physics course. Lab fee required. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This physics course is designed for science, engineering and mathematics majors. Topics studied are kinematics, mechanics and applications of mechanics. Lab fee required. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.
This honors physics course is designed for science, engineering and mathematics majors. Topics studied are kinematics, mechanics and applications of mechanics. Lab is included. Lab fee required. This course satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for degree seeking students.

* POS 2041 or POS 2041H partially satisfies the Civic Literacy requirement. Students entering the Florida College System for the first time in Fall 2022 or later can satisfy the Civic Literacy requirement by passing a course and an assessment.   Refer to the online catalog for assessment options.

U.S. Federal Government Gen Ed Core Civic Lit
3
Credits
In this course basic aspects of the federal government are studied. Emphasis is placed upon content and interpretation of the Constitution, Federalism, the Congress, the Presidency, the federal court system and the citizen's connection to the federal government by means of elections, political parties, interest groups and public opinion. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for A.A. degree seeking students and the Florida state civic literacy requirement per Florida Statues Section 1007.25 for all students.
Honors U.S. Federal Government Gen Ed Core Civic Lit
3
Credits
In this course, basic aspects of the federal government are studied. Emphasis is placed upon content and interpretation of the Constitution, Federalism, the Congress, the Presidency, the federal court system and the citizen's connection to the federal government by means of elections, political parties, interest groups and public opinion. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for A.A. degree seeking students and the Florida state civic literacy requirement per Florida Statues Section 1007.25 for all students.
Total Credits: 60

Gen Ed Core   Denotes that a class is a State of Florida General Education Core Course.

Beginning in the 2022-23 academic year and thereafter, students entering associate in arts, associate in science or associate in applied science, or baccalaureate degree programs must complete at least one (1) course from each of the general education subject areas listed in this section prior to the awarding of their degree. Please refer to this catalog's Graduation Requirements section for specific requirements on the General Education Core Courses .

Civic Lit   Denotes that a class counts toward the course Civic Literacy Requirement.

The State of Florida requires that all students graduating from Seminole State College of Florida and other institutions in the Florida College System (FCS), as well as from any State University System (SUS) institution, fulfill a Civic Literacy Competency requirement prior to submitting an Intent to Graduate form in the term they plan to graduate. Requirements vary based on admit term and program. Please refer to this catalog’s Graduation Requirements section for specific requirements on the Civic Literacy Proficiency Requirement.

Your tuition shouldn’t go against your intuition.

Your pursuit of higher education is admirable. So why struggle with high tuition in the process? Here we make life’s next steps affordable. Whether you’re seeking a university transfer (A.A.) degree, a four-year bachelor’s, an Associate in Science degree or even earning a technical certificate, you’ll find reasonable tuition and great value. And to us, that’s scholarly.

In fact, a full-time college education at Seminole State is more than $10,000 less each year than most state universities.

Go For Less.


Tuition and Fee Comparison*

 Seminole StateUFFSUUCF
Tuition and Fees$3,131$6,380$5,666 $5,954 
Room and Board-0-$10,950$11,592 $11,498 
Books and Supplies$1,000$810$1,000$1,200
Total$4,131$18,140$18,258$18,652

For more information on Seminole State's tuition and fees, please see the current fee schedule.

* Tuition costs are based on the current academic year for in-state students living on campus. Dorm fees, meal plans and book expenses are estimates based on cost of attendance information provided by the State University System of Florida. Lab fees and other fees that may be assessed at the time of registration may be viewed in the College fee schedule. As Seminole State is a commuter college with no residence halls on its campuses, costs for room and board are not calculated.

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