Available Courses for Mathematics

Important note for Fall 2020: all mathematics classes are currently scheduled in remote formats, either fully online OR remote with synchronous meeting times. No on-campus mathematics classes are expected to be offered this semester.

Use this course listing to view descriptions of the courses offered for the term indicated as well as other course information such as prerequisites (if applicable) dates, times and campus location when available. Some courses are offered only in specific terms.

To view all courses for this program, uncheck "Hide Courses Not Offered This Term." If a course you need is not offered this term, please contact the department to find out when it next will be offered.

This course is a study of the fundamental topics in advanced algebra with emphasis on applications, the understanding of the function concept and manipulative skills. Major topics include operations on algebraic expressions and complex numbers, solving polynomial equations and inequalities, absolute value equations and inequalities and rational equations and inequalities, applications, functions, exponents and logarithms, graphs of polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions and systems of equations and inequalities. The use of graphing calculators will be incorporated throughout the course. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course is a calculus preparatory course in trigonometry with emphasis upon functions. The topics include angular measure, right triangle and unit circle trigonometry, trigonometric (circular) and inverse trigonometric functions and their graphs, trigonometric identities, conditional trigonometric equations, solution of right and oblique triangles, vectors, complex numbers in trigonometric form, applications, polar coordinates and graphs and parametric equations and graphs. The use of graphing calculators will be incorporated throughout the course.
This is a course in precalculus algebra intended for the student who is planning to take trigonometry and the calculus sequence. Major topics include rational and other algebraic functions and their graphs, piecewise-defined functions, a review of exponential and logarithmic functions, conic sections, matrices and determinants, sequences and series, Mathematical Induction, the Binomial Theorem and applications. The use of graphing calculators will be incorporated throughout the course. This course may be taken concurrently with MAC 1114, Trigonometry.
This is a course in precalculus algebra and trigonometry intended for the student who is planning to take the calculus sequence. This course condenses into a five-credit hour format all topics of Precalculus Algebra (MAC 1140) and Trigonometry (MAC 1114). Algebra topics include the following: polynomial, rational and other algebraic functions and their graphs, piecewise-defined functions, a review of exponential and logarithmic functions, conic sections, matrices and determinants, sequences and series, Mathematical Induction, the Binomial Theorem and applications. Trigonometry topics include angular measure, right triangle and unit circle trigonometry, trigonometric (circular) and inverse trigonometric functions and their graphs, trigonometric identities, conditional trigonometric equations, solution of right and oblique triangles, vectors, complex numbers in trigonometric form, applications, polar coordinates and graphs and parametric equations and graphs. The use of graphing calculators will be incorporated throughout the course. Successful completion of a high school course containing trigonometric topics and/or concepts is recommended.
This course is scheduled for individual students who wish to explore topics not covered in the curriculum. The student must present a design of the study (learning contract) to the faculty member who is to direct the work. Approval from the dean is required prior to registration. This course must be completed with a grade of "C" or higher.
This course is a study of Differential and Integral Calculus of algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions with applications to business analysis. It is designed to provide the student of business and social sciences a course in applied calculus. This course is not intended for the student who is required to complete the calculus series.
This is a first course in analytic geometry and the theory and application of calculus. Selected topics include a review of functions, limits and continuity, the derivative, differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions and their inverses, the Mean Value and Intermediate Value Theorems, extrema and graph sketching, area and the definite integral, anti-differentiation and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and integration of transcendental functions and their inverses. A graphing calculator will be used throughout the course. Students should ask the instructor which calculator will be used. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This is a first course in analytic geometry and the theory and application of calculus. Selected topics include a review of functions, limits and continuity, the derivative, differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions and their inverses, the Mean Value and Intermediate Value Theorems, extrema and graph sketching, area and the definite integral, anti-differentiation and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and integration of transcendental functions and their inverses. The graphing calculator will be used throughout the course. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course is a continuation of MAC 2311. Selected topics include conics, translation and rotation of axes, techniques of integration, arc length and other applications of the definite integral, polar coordinates, indeterminate forms and improper integrals, infinite sequences and series and Taylor's Formula. A graphing calculator will be used throughout the course. Students should ask the instructor which calculator will be used.
This course is a continuation of MAC 2312. Selected topics include parametric equations, vectors in the plane and 3-space, directional derivatives and curvature, quadric surfaces, cylindrical and spherical coordinates, differential calculus of functions of two and three variables and multiple integration. A graphing calculator and a computer algebra system will be used throughout the course. Students should ask the instructor which calculator will be used.
This is a first course in ordinary differential equations with applications, including boundary value problems, methods of solution of first order differential equations and the solution of higher order linear equations by methods which may include undetermined coefficients, operators, variation of parameters, Laplace transforms and series solutions. A graphing calculator and a computer algebra system will be used throughout the course. Students should ask the instructor which calculator will be used.
This is a survey course of introductory linear algebra. Fundamental concepts of linear algebra and matrix theory are introduced. Topics in the course include vectors, matrices, determinants, linear transformations, system of linear equations, eigenvalues, eigenvectors and their applications.
This course includes whole numbers, integers, fractions, decimals, decimals and percents, geometry and pre-algebra. Credit is not applicable toward A.A. or A.S. degrees.
This course includes a combination of competencies from Developmental Mathematics I and II. Credit is not applicable toward A.A. or A.S. degrees.
This course includes exponents and polynomials, factoring, radicals, rationals, linear equations and graphing. Credit is not applicable toward A.A. or A.S. degrees.
The course uses an adaptive learning program in which students complete an initial assessment. Based on this assessment, students complete modularized assignments designed to strengthen specific deficiencies by working on the topics and objectives they need to master the material and achieve college readiness. Course credit is not applicable toward the A.A. or A.S. degrees. This course prepares students for MAT 1033 Intermediate Algebra and MAT 1100 Mathematical Understanding and Applications.
This course provides specialized instruction in developmental mathematics concepts to prepare students for Intermediate Algebra (MAT 1033). Topic modules include operations with whole numbers and integers, simplifying algebraic expressions, computations with fractions, mixed numbers, decimals, ratio, proportion and percent, plane geometric figures and applications, solving linear equations and inequalities, graphing linear equations, operations with exponents and polynomial expressions, introduction to rational expressions and radicals. Successful completion of this course requires mastery of the material in each module and a passing score on the department final exam. This course may be repeated for up to nine credits. Course credit is not applicable toward the A.A. or A.S. degrees. This course prepares students for MAT 1033 Intermediate Algebra and MAT 1100 Mathematical Understanding and Applications.
This is an intermediate course in formal algebra for students without a strong background in algebra. Topics include sets, the real number system and number properties, absolute value, products and factoring, algebraic fractions, linear and quadratic equations and inequalities with applications, systems of equations, radicals, rational exponents, graphs and relations and functions (four elective credits).
This course is designed to be a foundation for students preparing to take MGF 1106, MGF 1107 or STA 2023. A strong emphasis will be placed on the application of linear equations and inequalities, systems of linear equations and quadratic equations. Topics also include real numbers and their properties, products and factoring, graphs and functions, counting methods, descriptive statistics as well as an introduction to probability and financial mathematics. Students who already have credit for MAT 1033 Intermediate Algebra do not need to take this course.
The following topics will be covered in this course: sets and Venn diagrams, logic, inductive and deductive reasoning, counting principles, permutations and combinations, probability, descriptive statistics and geometry. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course provides an opportunity for students to see mathematics used in ways not seen in traditional mathematics courses. Topics are selected from the following: financial mathematics, numbers and number systems, elementary number theory and graph theory. Additional topics may be included at the discretion of the instructor. History of mathematics, critical thinking skills, problem-solving techniques and the appropriate use of technology will be used throughout the course. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course is designed to instruct students in the specific study habits, attitudes, thinking skills and problem-solving skills necessary for success in mathematics courses. Through the use of various attitude scales, students will determine personal strengths and weaknesses as well as behavior and attitude changes needed in order to maximize proficiency in mathematics. This course may be taken only one time for credit.
This course introduces descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, two-sample inferences, correlation and regression and nonparametric tests. This course is a first course in statistical methods for those students entering a science or business-related field. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This Honors course introduces descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, two-sample inferences, correlation and regression and nonparametric tests. This course is a first course in statistical methods and involves Honors students in projects and development of portfolios. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.

Contact

Julie Knott
407.708.2250
Fax: 407.708.2568
Office: S/LM Campus, F-210