Social Science Education Pathway Associate in Arts

For Spring Term 2022, we are offering in-person, hybrid, remote and online courses.  
For more information, view class types

Traditional face-to-face classes held on campus on set days and times. Currently, masks/cloth face coverings and other precautions are strongly recommended.

Inspire students to think critically about the world—and their role in it—by educating them on diverse subjects including history, political science and geography as a social science teacher. The prerequisite courses here will equip you with the tools to create a positive learning environment that encourages and empowers students to become active citizens of society.

Related Programs

Getting Started: Spring Term 2022

Sept. 30:  Financial Aid


Jan. 3:  Application


Jan. 10:  Classes Begin

Other Important Dates »

Why Seminole State?

  • Affordable tuition: Earn a state university education at about half the cost.
  • Small class sizes: With classes of 30 or less, you don’t have to learn in an auditorium.
  • Online degree option: The courses for our A.A. degree are offered in person and online, so you can study when and where you want. 
  • Seamless transition: With your A.A. degree, you can stay at Seminole State to continue your progress toward a bachelor’s degree in a high-demand field.
  • Guaranteed transfer: Earn your A.A. here, and take advantage of guaranteed admission to UCF or one of Florida’s other state universities for your bachelor’s.
  • More than 100 University Transfer Pathways: Take prerequisite courses for majors in various fields from accounting to theater.
Social Science Education Pathway
Type: Associate in Arts
Major Code: EDU-SSE
CIP: 1192401010
Educational Pathway: EDU-SSE

Program Description

Available Course Course Not Offered Spring 2022
This course begins with European arrival in the New World and moves on to colonial America, examining early America regionally. Pre-revolutionary America warrants special attention, including the French and Indian War leading to the Stamp Act and the activities of Boston's "Sons of Liberty." The Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution are examined in detail. Jeffersonian and Jacksonian democracy, westward expansion and the events and issues leading to the American Civil War conclude the course. The role of women and various ethnic groups in the development of America are considered throughout the course. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course begins with the "Reconstruction" period and examines the problems of reunifying America. The nation's industrial period gets close attention, as does the rise of American cities and their accompanying social and political problems. U.S. Imperialism and the Spanish-American War are examined. The "Progressive" period, which includes emphasis on the American Labor Movement and the demand for women's rights are included. World War I and its aftermath in the "Roaring Twenties" are analyzed. The Great Depression and World War II are detailed. The conflicts of the late twentieth century, including the Cold War, Korea, Vietnam and the American Civil Rights Movement are examined. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for A.A. degree seeking students and the Florida state civic literacy requirement per Florida Statues Section 1007.25 for all students.
This is a survey course that covers the historical, sociological and philosophical foundations of education, governance and finance of education, educational policies, legal, moral and ethical issues and the professionalism of teaching. Students will be provided information on the Florida Educator Accomplished Practices and Common Core State Standards. Students are required to complete a minimum of 15 hours of field-based experience with children and youth in schools or similar settings and not via virtual modes of film or Internet.
In this course basic aspects of the federal government are studied. Emphasis is placed upon content and interpretation of the Constitution, Federalism, the Congress, the Presidency, the federal court system and the citizen's connection to the federal government by means of elections, political parties, interest groups and public opinion. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for A.A. degree seeking students and the Florida state civic literacy requirement per Florida Statues Section 1007.25 for all students.
This course covers the study of man. It is an introductory course covering the economic, cultural, social and political development and technology of primitive societies. Attitudes, approach to problems and the general way of life of primitive societies are compared with modern societies. The course also provides a brief introduction to the development of fossil man and archaeology. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course will explore the nature, characteristics and content of culture from an anthropological perspective by examining the economy, art, religion, politics, language and kinship patterns of individual human societies. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Credit for this course is also awarded to entering students with appropriate scores on the International Baccalaureate (IB) examination in Social Anthropology.
In this course, topics of current interest are presented in group instruction. This course may be taken four times for credit. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
This travel study course combines preparation on campus, foreign travel and study abroad in the discipline of anthropology with variable content depending on the specific program in which the student enrolls. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
The nature of economics, production, distribution and price determination will be explored. Emphasis will be placed on practical application and policy determination. Current problems will be surveyed. The course is designed for non-business majors. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This is an introductory course covering the nature, scope and methods of economics, economic concepts and economic institutions. Emphasis is placed upon production, consumption, determination of prices, distribution of income, fiscal policy, national income determinants, money and banking and comparative economic systems. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for AA degree seeking students.
This course deals primarily with economic problems. Emphasis is given to markets, production functions, economic role of government, agricultural problems, labor-management relations, imperfect competition, interest and capital, economic security, international trade and finance and economic development. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
In this course, topics of current interest are presented in group instruction. This course may be taken four times for credit. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is an introductory study of the human and natural resources of the major regions of the world. From each region, one or more countries are selected for study in depth. Political, cultural, economic and strategic comparisons are made. The current role of the United States in the areas studied receives particular attention. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This is an introductory course which surveys the field of psychology and basic principles and concepts utilized to understand human behavior. The major areas of study include development, learning, perception, motivation, emotions, personality, abnormal behavior, psychotherapy and testing measurements. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Some sections of PSY 2012 have service-learning components. Please refer to class notes in schedule of classes for details. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for AA degree seeking students.
This course will examine influential experiments conducted in psychology over the last 100 years. These landmark studies have influenced and, at times, changed psychological principles and ethical standards. Major studies are in the areas of biopsychology, learning, memory, development, emotion, motivation, personality, psychopathology, therapies and social psychology. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is scheduled for individual students who wish to explore topics not covered in the curriculum. The student must present a design of study (learning contract) to the faculty member who is to direct the work. Approval from the dean or director is required prior to registration.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
This course is an introductory survey of sociology covering its scope, methods and general principles. Topics emphasized include group behavior, race relations, population, social institutions, social change and social stratification. The purpose of the course is to assist the student in acquiring an understanding of society. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course is an in-depth analysis into the scope and causes of major problem areas from the perspective of both the individual and the community. Consideration will be given to various possible remedial approaches to each problem area. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to study the changing culture of our nation. Issues of race, ethnicity, gender, class, nationality and globalism will be explored. This course is also designed to provide information and strategies for living and working in a pluralistic, multi-cultural society. Values and ethics of diversity and commonality will be emphasized. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course will explore the dynamics of conflict from a variety of frames. Students will be provided with valuable insight about conflict that will help lead to an understanding regarding the conflicts they are likely to face in life, at school or work, in society as well as those they observe in national headlines. An introduction to the dispute resolution practices of mediation, facilitation and negotiation will be conducted. The examination of how one's gender and cultural perspective may influence the approach and outcome of the conflict will be discussed. Current trends and issues within the field of conflict management and resolution will be reviewed. The course will engage students in the theory and application of addressing conflict management and resolution on an individual, interpersonal and international perspective. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to present students with an interdisciplinary study of the sexual functioning of humans. Course information is drawn liberally from the disciplines of sociology, psychology and biology, providing students with an integrated introduction to the study of human sexual behavior. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is a historical and comparative study of courtship, mate selection, engagement, marriage, husband-wife relationships and child-rearing in the United States. Emphasis is placed upon the changing contemporary family with respect to social and economic status, sex, sources of marital conflict and social values. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
Total Credits: 60

General Education Core Course. Denotes that a class is a State of Florida General Education Core Course. Please refer to this catalog's Graduation Requirements section for specific requirements on the General Education Core Courses.

Per Florida Statute 1007.25, “Beginning with students initially entering a Florida College System institution or state university in 2014-2015 and thereafter, coursework for an associate in arts degree shall include demonstration of competency in a foreign language.” Please refer to this catalog's Graduation Requirements section for specific requirements on Foreign Language Proficiency.

Your tuition shouldn’t go against your intuition.

Your pursuit of higher education is admirable. So why struggle with high tuition in the process? Here we make life’s next steps affordable. Whether you’re seeking a university transfer (A.A.) degree, a four-year bachelor’s, an Associate in Science degree or even earning a technical certificate, you’ll find reasonable tuition and great value. And to us, that’s scholarly.

In fact, a full-time college education at Seminole State is more than $10,000 less each year than most state universities.

Go For Less.


Tuition and Fee Comparison*

 Seminole StateUFFSUUCF
Tuition and Fees$3,131$6,380$6,538$6,379
Room and Board-0-$10,400$11,472$10,300
Books and Supplies$1,000$810$1,000$1,200
Total$4,131$17,590$19,010$17,879

For more information on Seminole State's tuition and fees, please see the 2021-22 fee schedule.

* Tuition costs are based on Fall 2021 and Spring 2022 terms, with 15 credit hours per term for in-state students. Dorm fees, meal plans and book expenses are estimates based on information provided on each university's website. Lab fees and other fees that may be assessed at the time of registration may be viewed in the College fee schedule. As Seminole State is a commuter college with no residence halls on its campuses, costs for room and board are not calculated.

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