Available English Courses

Use this course listing to view descriptions of the courses offered for the term indicated as well as other course information such as prerequisites (if applicable) dates, times and campus location when available. Some courses are offered only in specific terms.

To view all courses for this program, uncheck "Hide Courses Not Offered This Term." If a course you need is not offered this term, please contact the department to find out when it next will be offered.

American Literature I is a survey of the historical and cultural development of American belles-lettres from 1630 to the late nineteenth century with attention to the influence of prevalent ideas and expressions of the age. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is a survey of the historical and cultural development of American literature from the late nineteenth through the twentieth century. It focuses on the fiction, poetry and drama that precede and constitute the Modern Era. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course will provide a brief, but comprehensive study of the writing styles of selected African American writers. This study will include a historical perspective of the racial climate in American society, the connection between literature by African Americans and will examine current criticism on selected texts. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course provides students the opportunity for creative expression in the verbal arts. Although drama, fiction and poetry are studied and critiqued, students are free to concentrate in the genre of their choice and are encouraged to enter contests and to submit work for publication.
This course is an expansion of CRW 2001, focusing on formal writing exercises with more frequent deadlines and critiques in a workshop atmosphere emphasizing individual instruction. This course may be taken four times for credit. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
In this course, topics of current interest are presented in group instruction.
This is a course in the process of expository writing. Students will read essays and compose papers that are unified, organized, logically developed and supported, clearly stated and well-focused. Research techniques are introduced and incorporated into at least one composition. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Students must pass the core assignments with a grade of "C" or higher. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Communications requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This is a course in the process of expository writing. Students will read essays and compose papers that are unified, organized, logically developed and supported, clearly stated and well-focused. Research techniques are introduced and incorporated into at least one composition. Some assignments may be coordinated with other Honors courses. Students must pass the core assignments with a grade of "C" or higher. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors coordinator. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Communications requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This laboratory course is designed to support students' English composition skills.
In this course, students develop the ability to read literary texts critically, to think logically and creatively and to write and research effectively. Students must pass the core assignments with a grade of "C" or higher. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This is a course designed to develop the student's ability to read literary and interdisciplinary texts critically, to think logically and creatively and to write and research effectively. Some assignments may be coordinated with other Honors courses. Students must pass the department's core assignments for ENC 1102H with a grade of "C" or higher. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors coordinator.
This course is a study of and practice in various forms of technical writing such as complete formal reports, letters of application, resumes, articles or technical essays and oral presentations. Emphasis is on the grasp of scientific and technical ideas and effective verbal presentation of these ideas. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
In this course, students will explore different approaches to writing about the natural world and discuss issues raised by such writing.
In this course, students will prepare essays for the programs of shows Seminole State College produces that discuss the historical nature of the show or explain the artistic choices made in the production; work on the development of outreach sources/teachable units for local schools to use in support of attending a show and eventually support the use of such resources; read new drama and analyze the how "produce-able" a show would be for Seminole State College's resources and write an analysis report of their findings.
In this course, students will prepare essays for the programs of shows Seminole State College produces that discuss the historical nature of the show or explain the artistic choices made in the production; work on the development of outreach sources/teachable units for local schools to use in support of attending a show and eventually support the use of such resources; read new drama and analyze the how "produce-able" a show would be for Seminole State College's resources and write an analysis report of their findings.
This course is scheduled for individual students who wish to explore topics not covered in the curriculum. The student must present a design of the study (learning contract) to the faculty member who is to direct the work. Approval from the dean is required prior to registration. This course must be completed with a grade of "C" or higher. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030 and may be used to partially satisfy the General Education Communications requirement.
This course is designed to help students become more active, critical viewers of films and to be able to communicate that understanding in writing. Like written forms of literature, movies are texts that can be analyzed and interpreted. Students will view a number of films from different time periods, genres and artistic approaches. Lectures will concentrate on the narrative and stylistic elements used by film makers. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030 and the Humanities Area B General Education requirement.
This is a survey course designed to introduce students to the cinematic arts of a particular national cinema and to encourage them to think globally. Emphasis will be given to internationally recognized filmmakers of foreign cinemas and their recent new directors. Students will watch and analyze numerous films. They will study the aesthetics of film language as well as the social and cultural conditions that produce the cinema. The course will encourage student understanding of the intellectual, spiritual and moral issues that unite people despite differences in time, place, language and culture. Specific film content may vary from term to term. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030 and the Humanities Area B General Education requirement.
In this course, topics of current interest are presented in group instruction.
This course is a survey of the development of British literature from Anglo-Saxon times through the eighteenth century with attention to the historical background, the continuity of essential traditions and the characteristic temper of successive periods. Major emphasis is on the Old English, Middle English and Renaissance periods. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
British Literature II emphasizes the relevance of Romanticism, Victorianism and the first half of the twentieth century to contemporary thought. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This is a travel/study course combining preparation on campus, foreign travel and study abroad in the discipline of British literature. Variable content depending on the program in which the student enrolls and the specific topics to be covered. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Students must be 18 years of age on or before departure. Permission of instructor or dean is required.
This is a travel/study course combining preparation on campus, travel and study in interdisciplinary studies. Content is varied depending on the program in which the student enrolls and the specific topics covered. Students must be 18 years of age on or before departure and permission of instructor or dean is required.
This course provides basic instruction in reporting techniques, news and feature writing, editorial writing, page makeup and layout and other mechanics of newspaper production. Ethics, responsibilities and laws of the press are stressed. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course focuses on the principles of format and layout design, copy editing, headline writing and print media style. Students will write articles, edit and design a news publication with Journalism I students.
This course focuses on writing and producing across media. Essentially, it teaches students how to tell stories in a more engaging way with converged media - using multiple mediums simultaneously to create a stronger story. The program also focuses on training students to report, produce and disseminate news by using new media platforms, such as tablet apps and social media.
This course covers the practical application of newsgathering, writing, editing, layout, graphic and photographic skills and journalistic knowledge and judgment in the production of multiple issues of the student newspaper, which also serves as a forum of opinion and a medium of information for the College community.
This course covers the practical application of newsgathering, writing, editing, layout, graphic and photographic skills and journalistic knowledge and judgment in the production of multiple issues of the student newspaper, which also serves as a forum of opinion and a medium of information for the College community.
Applying the principles of good editing, typography, dynamic layout and design and thematic coherence, the magazine staff presents the prose, poetry, art and photography selected by the editorial board (Creative Writing II class) in an attractive publication for distribution throughout the College.
Applying the principles of good editing, typography, dynamic layout and design and thematic coherence, the magazine staff presents the prose, poetry, art and photography selected by the editorial board (Creative Writing II class) in an attractive publication for distribution throughout the College. Lab fee required.
This course provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the ethical and practical demands of photojournalism. The course covers the basics of camera operation and photo enhancement software as well as image composition and selection. Students will be responsible for producing a body of work suitable for publication and will be required to complete a variety of assignments by attending various community events.
This course is the laboratory component of JOU 1602 Introduction to Photojournalism. Lab fee required.
This course focuses on in-depth news reporting and writing for print, web, radio and television. It teaches students the nature of news in a changing media landscape, and it equips them with reporting tools and techniques for effective storytelling while writing for specific media. While focusing on basic stories and specialized reporting, this course also introduces students to media law and ethics as they relate to the rights and responsibilities of a journalist in a democratic society.
This course focuses on writing news for radio and television, and it emphasizes how the selection criteria for radio and television news differ from those of print news. It teaches students how to prepare radio and television news copy as well as explains the guidelines for using social media as a source of content in a newsroom.
This course explores the craft of writing that makes reporting come alive to readers by exploring feature writing techniques and philosophies. Students will learn the basics of feature writing, understand the defining characteristics of various types of specialized writing and learn how to sell freelance stories to media outlets.
This course covers the practical application of newsgathering, writing, editing, layout, graphic and photographic skills and journalistic knowledge and judgment in the production of multiple issues of the student newspaper which also serves as a forum of opinion and medium of information for the College community.
This course covers the practical application of newsgathering, writing, editing, layout, graphic and photographic skill and journalistic knowledge and judgment in the production of multiple issues of the student newspaper which also serves as a forum of opinion and medium of information for the College community.
Applying the principles of good editing, typography, dynamic layout and design and thematic coherence, the magazine staff presents the prose, poetry, art and photography selected by the editorial board (Creative Writing II class) in an attractive publication for distribution throughout the College. Lab fee required.
Applying the principles of good editing, typography, dynamic layout and design and thematic coherence, the magazine staff presents the prose, poetry, art and photography selected by the editorial board (Creative Writing II class) in an attractive publication for distribution throughout the College. Lab fee required.
In this course topics of current interest are presented in group instruction.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. Seminars may be a component of this course and regular contact with the assigned faculty advisor is required. Students may earn cooperative education credits based on the completion of the required work experience and satisfactory completion of assignments including, but not limited to, seminars and a project. This course may be repeated based upon the student’s academic program.
Gain the knowledge, skills and abilities to succeed in college-level research by identifying, evaluating and using diverse information sources from the internet and library databases. This course follows the research process that includes developing topics and thesis statements, creating search strategies and critically evaluating and ethically citing sources. These research and critical thinking skills are crucial for success not only in college but also in the workplace.
This course is designed to further student understanding of the concepts and applications of analytical and theoretical approaches to literature. Students will employ critical thinking in their interrogation of the texts. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course will explore trends and influences in literature from World War II to the present. Contemporary literature will be examined as a reflection of the philosophy of modern life and as a reflection of the student's world. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course will explore trends and influences in literature from World War II to the present. Contemporary literature will be examined as a reflection of the philosophy of modern life and as a reflection of the student's world. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to create an awareness of the ideas, techniques and historical relationships in world literature from the Enlightenment to the present. The Enlightenment, Romanticism, the 19th Century (Realism and Naturalism) and Modernism will be studied. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to create an awareness of the ideas, techniques and historical relationships in world literature from the Enlightenment to the present. The Enlightenment, Romanticism, the 19th Century (Realism and Naturalism) and Modernism will be studied. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
In this course topics of current interest are presented in group instruction. Students with qualifying scores on the CLEP Analyzing and Interpreting Literature exam may receive credit for this course.
This is a travel/study course combining preparation on campus, foreign travel and study abroad in the discipline of literature. Variable content depending on the program in which the student enrolls and the specific topics to be covered. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Students must be 18 years of age on or before departure. Permission of instructor or dean is required.
This is an introductory course dealing with the history and role in society of the mass media. Emphasis is on press, magazines, television and radio and on the functions of advertising and public relations. Career opportunities in the various media are covered.

Contact

English Office
407.708.2060