Honors Certificate Program Technical Certificate

Honors Certificate Program Technical Certificate
Type: Tech Cert
Major Code : HONC-INT
CIP: 1192401010

Program Description

Academically talented students with majors such as chemistry, music, nursing and physics that require a strict course of study are encouraged to enroll in the Honors Seminar Program to earn an Honors Certificate as an alternative to the Honors Diploma. Students may take some of their basic general education courses such as English, speech, humanities and history within the Honors curriculum. The Honors Certificate is one of five tracks available in The Art & Phyllis Grindle Honors Institute.

To earn an Honors Certificate, students must take a minimum of 13 Honors credits. These credits apply to the Associate in Arts and the Associate in Science degrees.

Like the Honors Diploma Program (an A.A. degree program), the Honors Certificate is restricted-access. Candidates must:

  • Apply and be accepted to Seminole State College;
  • Provide official transcripts, indicating successful completion of high school or GED®;
  • Have a high school GPA of 3.2 or have earned a 3.2 GPA in a minimum of six credit hours of college-credit classes;
  • Have a score of at least 23 on the ACT; or 95 on the CPT Reading Test and 75 on the CPT Math Test or 1050 on the SAT; or 1050 on math and writing or reading on the new SAT;
  • Submit an application to the Honors Program;
  • Submit two letters of recommendation;
  • Schedule an interview with the Honors Coordinator;
  • Complete an on-site writing sample.
Available Courses
Required Courses
This course orients Honors students to the College and the Honors program. The course focuses on leadership development, critical thinking skills and problem-solving. Study skills, presentation skills and research methods are also emphasized.
General Education Courses
Choose a minimum of 13 credits of Honors General Education and Honors Elective courses.
This course begins with European arrival in the New World and moves on to Colonial America, examining early America regionally. Pre-revolutionary America warrants special attention, including the French and Indian War leading to the Stamp Act and the activities of Boston's "Sons of Liberty." The Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution are examined in detail. Jeffersonian and Jacksonian democracy, westward expansion and the events and issues leading to the American Civil War conclude the course. The role of women and various ethnic groups in the development of America are considered through the course. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course begins with the "Reconstruction" period and examines the problems of reunifying America. The nation's industrial period gets close attention, as does the rise of American cities and their accompanying social and political problems. U.S. Imperialism and the Spanish-American War are examined. The "Progressive" period, which includes emphasis on the American Labor Movement and the demand for women's rights are included. World War I and its aftermath in the "Roaring Twenties" are analyzed. The Great Depression and World War II are detailed. The conflicts of the late twentieth century, including the Cold War, Korea, Vietnam and the American Civil Rights movement are examined. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for A.A. degree seeking students and the Florida state civic literacy requirement per Florida Statues Section 1007.25 for all students.
This course examines the major political, social, economic, cultural, military and diplomatic development that shaped the development of the modern American nation since 1945, including World War II, the Cold War, the McCarthy Era, the complacent fifties, the turbulent sixties, the disillusioning seventies and the search for new directions since, to include the 1980's. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course will cover the role of women in American history from the colonial period to the present. Emphasis will be placed upon the contributions of women to the development of colonial America and their role in pre-Revolutionary times. A separate section will analyze women during the War of Independence and the writing of the U.S. Constitution. Women during the early Republic on the eve of the Civil War and their role in the Reconstruction of America will likewise be discussed. Also addressed is the topic of women as leaders of the "Progressive" movement and during World War I and World War II. The "Women's Lib" movement of the 1960s and 1970s is examined and the role of women in America today concludes the course. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course begins with the origins of various tribes and a survey of ancient, pre-colonial civilizations in North America. Conflict and survival during European colonization are examined in detail as well as tribal responses to rebellion within the British Empire. Intertribal alliances and the United States Removal Policy warrant special attention, including the relationship between colonization of western territories and the U. S. Civil War. Government assimilation policies, intertribal activism and government reorganization of tribes will also be discussed. Native experiences during World War II and postwar activism will conclude the course. Social, political, economic and geographic diversity within and between tribes will be discussed throughout the course as will the struggle between colonization and decolonization. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is a study of plant and animal interactions in their natural environment and the influence of man on these natural systems. Active learning components may include outdoor activities and/or field trips. Designed for non-majors. Honors level content. Permission of the Honors director is required.
This is an introduction to the basic principles of associative learning. The primary focus of the course is on how organisms learn about their relationships that occur in the environment. This will be achieved through studying the phenomena of classical and operant conditioning in animals and humans. Specific techniques for understanding behavior are presented.
This is a one-semester course for the non-science major designed to meet the General Education requirement for the A.A. degree. Presumes no chemistry or mathematics background. Basic chemical principles are covered and related to larger topics that may include the chemistry of water and the atmosphere, energy sources, natural and man-made materials and environmental issues. Laboratory exercises during the lecture may be used to complement course material. Lab fee required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course serves as the first semester of the two-semester general chemistry sequence. Topics covered include problem-solving, atomic and molecular structure, chemical formulas and nomenclature, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, bonding models, gas laws, solutions and other selected topics. Laboratory experiments are chosen that support these topics. Lab fee required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course serves as a continuation of CHM 2045C. Topics covered include chemical bonding models, properties of solutions, thermodynamics, reaction kinetics, chemical equilibrium, electrochemistry and nuclear chemistry. The course stresses integration of chemical knowledge. The laboratory is primarily qualitative analysis. Lab fee required.
This is an introductory course covering the nature, scope and method of economics, economic concepts and institutions. Emphasis is placed upon production, consumption, determination of prices, distribution of income, fiscal policy, national income determinants, money and banking and comparative economic systems. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for AA degree seeking students.
This course deals primarily with economic problems. Emphasis is given to markets, production functions, economic role of government, agricultural problems, labor-management relations, imperfect competition, interest and capital, economic security, international trade and finance and economic development. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This is a course in the process of expository writing. Students will read essays and compose papers that are unified, organized, logically developed and supported, clearly stated and well-focused. Research techniques are introduced and incorporated into at least one composition. Some assignments may be coordinated with other Honors courses. Students must pass the core assignments with a grade of "C" or higher. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors coordinator. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Communications requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This is a course designed to develop the student's ability to read literary and interdisciplinary texts critically, to think logically and creatively and to write and research effectively. Some assignments may be coordinated with other Honors courses. Students must pass the department's core assignments for ENC 1102H with a grade of "C" or higher. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors coordinator.
This course traces the rise of Western civilization from 1000 B.C.E. to the Renaissance, c. 1600. It emphasizes Greek civilization including drama, mythology, philosophy and the origins of Greek democracy and then examines the late Roman Republic and early Roman Empire followed by the rise of Christianity, Islam, the Byzantine Empire, the "Flowering of Medieval Culture" and the Christian Synthesis of the late Middle Ages. The European Renaissance and the Reformation including social, political and philosophical issues will be discussed. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course covers the period from c. 1600 to the present. Topics include the scientific revolution, the rise of absolute monarchy in Europe, the 18th-century Enlightenment and the French Revolution. The impact of Napoleon is addressed as is the Industrial Revolution and the advent of socialism, including Marxism. Cultural ideas from Romanticism to social Darwinism are analyzed. European imperialism, World War I and the rise of fascism lead to a discussion of World War II. The impact of western civilization on Asia, Africa and the Middle East are also considered. The Cold War and the modern period conclude the course. Permission required from Honors director. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
The design of this course creates a diverse learning community for students in the Liberal Studies program. The course is a multi-cultural and inter-disciplinary study of the arts, performing arts, literature, history and philosophy with special focus on race, gender and class. Honors level material. The course satisfies three credits of General Education requirements in Humanities and partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B. E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to study representative works of the 20th and early 21st centuries in the performing arts, visual arts, music, literature, film and philosophy so that the student will appreciate the foundations of the 20th century and allow projections into the future. Global culturalism will be incorporated into the course content. The student will be introduced to Internet resources as they pertain to appropriate thematic materials. This course will also show how technology interacts with culture in the contemporary world. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to introduce the student to the contributions of women in the humanities. It will examine their contributions to literature, art and music from the Classical period to the present day. Students will learn how gender has influenced production of the arts throughout these periods. Examining notions of masculinity and femininity will be a key component of the course and their various representations in art, literature and music will be a major subject of study. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
Honors Asian Humanities is designed to introduce the student to the cultures of India, Tibet and Southeast Asia. The basic myths underlying culture will be studied as well as their manifestation in the arts. The course will explore the development of Indian thought with special emphasis on early Buddhism and the development of Mahayana Buddhist schools. Representative works in literature, mythology, philosophy and the visual arts will be studied. Archeological rites in Cambodia, Burma and Thailand will be studied as examples of myth in architecture. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to explore African American cultures and artistic manifestations and to promote increased awareness, understanding, degrees of tolerance and aesthetic appreciation of African American heritage. Pre-European African influences to modern cultural values of African American societies will be examined. Contemplative objects representing both visual and performing arts will be studied in their historical context. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to introduce the student to Latin American cultures and to promote the understanding and appreciation of Latin American heritage. Ancient to modern cultures will be surveyed. Emphasis will be placed on cultural roots and myth as well as artists' commitment to social and political struggle. Representative works in the visual arts, literature and music will be studied. No knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese is required. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
In this course topics of current interest are presented in group instruction. This course may be taken four times for credit. Acceptance into the Honors program or permission from the Honors Director required.
This course is a diverse study of fine arts, performing arts, literature, history and philosophy from the prehistoric era to the Renaissance. Focus will be on multi-culturalism, examination of primary texts and inter-disciplinary influences on the formation of human culture. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. The course is only open to students in the Honors program. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director.
This Honors course will examine selectively the events, individuals and issues that have determined the course of various civilizations from ancient times to the Middle Ages. The contributions of Near Eastern and African civilizations as well as those of the Greek and Roman worlds will be studied. The influence of religion upon various civilizations, especially those of the Hebrews, Christians and Muslims will be addressed. An inter-disciplinary approach will highlight cultural achievements, including an examination of drama, architecture and poetry. Participants will be required to write a research paper and read passages from primary sources of classical literature. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. Satisfies the General Education requirement in history and partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is a diverse study of fine arts, performing arts, technological arts, literature, history and philosophy from the Renaissance to the present. The focus will be on multi-culturalism, examination of primary texts and interdisciplinary influences on the formation of human culture. Satisfies three credits of General Education requirements in Humanities and partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. The course is only open to students in the Honors program. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director.
The purpose of this course is to elevate the basic skills of speaking and listening to a level appropriate for Honors students. While the course will satisfy the state requirements for preparing and delivering public speeches with clarity and variety and listening with literal and critical comprehension, the Honors level will focus on those skills in an advanced setting of the controversial arts, including critical thinking, dialectic, rhetoric and argumentation. In preparation, Honors students will study original materials from Aristotle to current research in argumentation and debate. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. Satisfies General Education requirement in oral communications.
This course is an introduction to major issues and theories of world politics. Topics include state and non-state actors, the nature of power, causes of war and peace, terrorism, international organizations, finance and trade, economic development, globalization, human rights and environmental concerns. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course will explore trends and influences in literature from World War II to the present. Contemporary literature will be examined as a reflection of the philosophy of modern life and as a reflection of the student's world. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to create an awareness of the ideas, techniques and historical relationships in world literature from the Enlightenment to the present. The Enlightenment, Romanticism, the 19th Century (Realism and Naturalism) and Modernism will be studied. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is a study of the fundamental topics in advanced algebra with an emphasis on applications, the understanding of the function concept and manipulative skills. Major topics include operations on algebraic expressions and complex numbers, solving polynomial equations and inequalities, absolute value equations and inequalities and rational equations and inequalities, applications, functions, exponents and logarithms, graphs of polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions and systems of equations and inequalities. The use of graphing calculators will be incorporated throughout the course. Honors level content, including enhanced use of technology and critical thinking skills in application problems will be essential components of this course. Permission required from Honors director. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This is a first course in analytic geometry and the theory and application of calculus. Selected topics include a review of functions, limits and continuity, the derivative, differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions and their inverses, the Mean Value and Intermediate Value Theorems, extrema and graph sketching, area and the definite integral, anti-differentiation and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and integration of transcendental functions and their inverses. The graphing calculator will be used throughout the course. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This honors level introductory course is designed to acquaint students with the oceans, Earth's most dominant feature and their importance to all planetary systems. Focus will be on their physical, chemical, biological and geological characteristics. Emphasis is on Florida and its unique relationship with the ocean environment. Field trips may be included. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director.
This is an introductory psychology course with an Honors designation. It intends to survey the field of psychology and the basic principles and concepts utilized to understand major behavior. The major areas of study include methodology, statistics and a research literature survey as well as the major areas of the field of psychology. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for AA degree seeking students.
The basic principles of political thought are studied in this course. Students will examine the state and the relationship between the individual and the state. Topics such as authority, consent, freedom and obligation are examined. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
The course covers the study of fundamental philosophical problems and concepts. Speculation about limits of human understanding, value judgments, foundations of morality and speculation about the existence of God will be covered in order to present students with the tools for constructing their own philosophy. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Humanities requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This honors physics course is designed for science, engineering and mathematics majors. Topics studied are kinematics, mechanics and applications of mechanics. Lab is included. Lab fee required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Science requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This honors physics course is designed for science, engineering and mathematics majors. Topics studied include electricity, magnetism and topics of electromagnetism. Lab fee required.
In this course basic aspects of the federal government are studied. Emphasis is placed upon content and interpretation of the Constitution, Federalism, the Congress, the Presidency, the federal court system and the citizen's connection to the federal government by means of elections, political parties, interest groups and public opinion. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for A.A. degree seeking students and the Florida state civic literacy requirement per Florida Statues Section 1007.25 for all students.
This Honors course introduces descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, two-sample inferences, correlation and regression and nonparametric tests. This course is a first course in statistical methods and involves Honors students in projects and development of portfolios. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Mathematics requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This course is applied sociology that will pursue a unique, original research project each semester. It provides students with an in-depth understanding of social scientific research through experimental investigation. Utilizing the research project as a point of focus, this course includes training in all aspects of empirical research, including literature review, methodology, data collection, data coding, data analysis and presentation of results. Previous coursework in sociology or psychology is recommended. Honors level content. Permission required from Honors director.
The purpose of this course is to improve the basic skills of speaking and listening. Class exercises emphasize preparing and delivering public speeches, speaking with clarity and variety and listening with literal and critical comprehension.
This course is an introductory survey of sociology covering its scope, methods and general principles. Topics emphasized include group behavior, race relations, population, social institutions, social change and social stratification. The purpose of the course is to assist the student in acquiring an understanding of society. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Note: This course contains Honors level material. Acceptance into the Honors Program or Permission from the Honors Director required. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for A.A. degree seeking students.
This survey course traces the historical background and development of Christianity from the first century to the Medieval period. There is an emphasis on the Hebraic roots of Christianity, the political and social setting of Palestine during the time of Jesus of Nazareth and the problems involved in the so-called, "Quest for the Historical Jesus." The missionary work of St. Paul is closely examined, as is emerging Christian doctrine between 100 and 500 C.E. Philosophical and spiritual alternatives to Christianity are also analyzed, as is Christianity's relationship to the Roman and Byzantine Empires. Everyday life and forms of worship among Christians are studied, as is Christianity as a political institution. While matters of faith and doctrine are discussed, the course perspective is historical rather than religious. Honors level content. Permission required from the Honors director. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
Elective Courses
The Honors Seminar course is designed to address contemporary issues, faculty areas of expertise, current intellectual trends and topics of interest to Honor students. Seminar discussions focus on topics or themes and lectures by guest speakers often augment the course.
Honors Seminar II is a continuation of Honors Seminar. It is designed to address contemporary issues, faculty areas of expertise, current intellectual trends and topics of interest to Honors students. Seminar discussions focus on topics or themes and lectures by guest speakers often augment the course.
Honors Seminar III is an in-depth study of contemporary issues, faculty areas of expertise, current intellectual trends or topics of interest to Honors students. Seminar discussions focus on topics or themes and lectures by guest speakers often augment the course.
This course is scheduled for individual students who wish to explore topics not covered in the curriculum. The student must present a design of the study (learning contract) to the faculty member who is to direct the work. Approval from the dean or director is required prior to registration.
In this course topics of current interest are presented in group instruction. This course may be taken four times for credit.
In this course topics of current interest are presented in group instruction. This course may be taken four times for credit.
The student will complete, under the guidance of a faculty mentor, a project that will define and execute a research question. Guidelines will be established regarding format, standards and review of projects.
This course is a culminating experience for students in the Grindle Honors Institute. Students will reflect on and articulate their academic and personal growth through the development of an Honors Portfolio. Through documentation of academic and co-curricular experiences, students connect their undergraduate experience to the objectives of the Grindle Honors Institute.
This Honors travel/study course combines preparation on campus, travel and study. Content is variable depending on the program in which the student enrolls and the specific topics to be covered. Students must be 18 years of age on or before departure. Permission of the Honors director required.
Total Credits:
13

Textbook information will be available online for each term's courses 45 days prior to the first day of classes for the term.

Each course offered by Seminole State is listed alphabetically and organized by the course prefix, catalog number and description. The courses in this catalog are identified by prefixes and numbers that were assigned by Florida's Statewide Course Numbering System, a system used by all public postsecondary institutions in Florida and 32 non-public institutions. Seminole State controls the description, credit and content of its own courses.

Contact

The Honors Institute
407.708.2600

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