International Studies Technical Certificate Curriculum

International Studies Technical Certificate
Type: Tech Cert
Major Code : INTC-INT
CIP: 1192401010

Program Description

The International Studies Certificate enhances students’ global sociocultural responsibility. Participation in the certificate program will help students to emerge as more globally competent citizens through a multi-disciplinary approach to the study of history, politics, culture, economics and modern foreign language. To earn the certificate, students must complete 26 credits from the menu of courses provided below. While most of the courses will meet General Education requirements, some of the courses will serve as electives. In addition, students must satisfy the extracurricular study abroad travel requirement. This may be achieved by satisfying a combination of the following: 

  • One month (minimum of 4 weeks) overseas immersion experience in one country (e.g. internship abroad, documented ministry experience, study abroad program, personal travel that includes a travel log and itinerary, etc.);
  • Participation in two faculty-led 10-day (or longer) short-term study abroad program experiences (students must take the course associated with this trip); 
  • Participation in one faculty-led 10-day (or longer) short-term study abroad program experience (students must take the course associated with this trip) and complete a follow-up project with the Center for Global Engagement;
  • All travel must be pre-approved in writing by the Center for Global Engagement.

Requirements

  1. Students must earn 26 credit hours from the courses listed below.  While most of the courses below will meet General Education requirements, some of the courses will serve as electives.
  2. In addition to completion of the Curricular Requirements for the International Studies Certificate, students must also complete one of the following Extracurricular Requirements while the student is enrolled at Seminole State College of Florida:
    1. Documented completion of having lived and/or studied abroad for a minimum of 30 continuous calendar days in one country.
    2. Documented completion of having lived and/or studied abroad on two separate occasions, each lasting a minimum of 10 continuous calendar days. One of these occasions must have been completed on a Seminole State College faculty-led (or other approved) program.
    3. Documented completion of having lived and/or studied abroad on one occasion for a minimum of 10 continuous calendar days on a Seminole State College faculty-led (or other approved) program AND the completion of a three-credit travel study course in conjunction with, or within two years of completion of the trip. Credit must be evaluated and approved by the original faculty member who conducted the trip and the Center for Global Engagement Internationalization Committee.
    4. Documented completion of one Seminole State College faculty-led study abroad (or other approved) trip lasting a minimum of 10 continuous calendar days AND the completion of a three-credit selected studies course of the student’s choice (Anthropology, Business, Humanities, etc.). During the selected studies course, the student will prepare a PowerPoint presentation which must be successfully presented to the Center for Global Engagement Internationalization Committee, addressing internationally focused questions/issues within the context of the discipline represented by the selected studies course: ARC 2930 Architectural Design, ANT 2930 Anthropology, ECO 2930 Economics, ETD 2930 Engineering, FOL 2930 Foreign Language, GEB 2931 Business, HIS 2930 History, HUM 2930 Humanities, IDS 2931 Interdisciplinary Studies, JOU 2930 Journalism, LIT 2930 Literature, PLA 2930 Law or THE 2930 Theatre.
Available Courses
Choose six credits from the following list
6
This course begins with the "Reconstruction" period and examines the problems of reunifying America. The nation's industrial period gets close attention, as does the rise of American cities and their accompanying social and political problems. U.S. Imperialism and the Spanish-American War are examined. The "Progressive" period, which includes emphasis on the American Labor Movement and the demand for women's rights are included. World War I and its aftermath in the "Roaring Twenties" are analyzed. The Great Depression and World War II are detailed. The conflicts of the late twentieth century, including the Cold War, Korea, Vietnam and the American Civil Rights Movement are examined. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for A.A. degree seeking students and the Florida state civic literacy requirement per Florida Statues Section 1007.25 for all students.
This course examines the history of China, Japan and Korea from 1600 to the present. It will examine the major political, cultural and religious influences during this period. It will also examine the influence of East Asia on the European and American economies and vice versa.
This course covers the period from c. 1600 to the present. Topics include the scientific revolution, the rise of absolute monarchy in Europe, the 18th-century Enlightenment and the French Revolution. The impact of Napoleon is addressed as is the Industrial Revolution and the advent of socialism, including Marxism. Cultural ideas from Romanticism to social Darwinism are analyzed. European imperialism, World War I and the rise of fascism lead to a discussion of World War II. The impact of western civilization on Asia, Africa and the Middle East are also considered. The Cold War and the modern period conclude the course. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course will cover the history of Latin America from 1492 to the present, emphasizing the multi-racial origins of Latin American countries, the development of political institutions, the relationship between Latin America and the U.S.A. and the response of modern Latin America to the challenges of democracy and economic development. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
Choose six credits from the following list
6
This course is designed to introduce the student to the Indian and Southeast Asian cultures. Emphasis will be placed on the basic myths underlying culture, their manifestation in the arts and their diffusion throughout South and Southeast Asia. Representative works in literature, mythology, philosophy and the visual arts will be studied. The student will be introduced to Internet resources as they pertain to appropriate thematic materials. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to introduce the student to Latin American cultures and to promote the understanding and appreciation of its cultural heritage. Ancient to modern cultures will be surveyed. Emphasis will be placed on cultural roots and myth as well as artists' commitment to social and political struggle. Representative works in the visual arts, literature and music will be studied. No knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese is required. The student will be introduced to Internet resources as they pertain to appropriate thematic materials. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is an ideological study of the major religions of the world emphasizing the relationships of their major tenets to our modern society. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
Choose eight credits from the following list
8
This is a beginning course focusing on the fundamentals of French grammar and vocabulary. Students will develop language skills by listening, speaking, reading and writing in French. In addition, the course emphasizes multi-cultural understanding of French and Francophone cultures. Lab fee required.
This course is a continuation of Elementary French I. It consists of a more advanced level of French grammar and vocabulary. Students will continue to develop language skills by listening, speaking, reading and writing in French. In addition, the course emphasizes multi-cultural understanding of French and Francophone cultures. Pre-requisite: FRE 1120. Lab fee required.
This is a beginning course focusing on the fundamentals of Spanish grammar and vocabulary. Students will develop language skills by listening, speaking, reading and writing in Spanish. The course introduces students to the culture of Spanish-speaking countries. Lab fee required.
This course is a continuation of SPN 1120. Emphasis is placed on more advanced Spanish grammar and vocabulary. Students will continue to develop language skills by listening, speaking, reading and writing in Spanish. The course will continue to introduce students to the culture of Spanish-speaking countries. Lab fee required. Prerequisite: SPN 1120.
Choose six credits from the following list
6
This course will explore the nature, characteristics and content of culture from an anthropological perspective by examining the economy, art, religion, politics, language and kinship patterns of individual human societies. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Credit for this course is also awarded to entering students with appropriate scores on the International Baccalaureate (IB) examination in Social Anthropology.
This is an introductory course covering the nature, scope and methods of economics, economic concepts and economic institutions. Emphasis is placed upon production, consumption, determination of prices, distribution of income, fiscal policy, national income determinants, money and banking and comparative economic systems. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030. This class satisfies the General Education State Core Social Science/History requirement for AA degree seeking students.
This course is an introductory study of the human and natural resources of the major regions of the world. From each region, one or more countries are selected for study in depth. Political, cultural, economic and strategic comparisons are made. The current role of the United States in the areas studied receives particular attention. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is an introduction to major issues and theories of world politics. Topics include state and non-state actors, the nature of power, causes of war and peace, terrorism, international organizations, finance and trade, economic development, globalization, human rights and environmental concerns. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course will explore the dynamics from a variety of frames. The course will provide a cursory overview of various issues such as conflict, violence, war, non-violence and peace. The course is intended to engage students in the theory and application addressing conflict, violence, war and terrorism. Students will examine approaches to peace, alternatives to war and to peace-building through peace studies and non-violence movements. The course will adopt the frame that we must review actions of the past in order to prevent recurrences. The student will draw upon the ideology of individuals identified as great peacemakers. While exploring great peacemakers, a focus on personal non-violence, ethical approaches to war, conflict transformation or peace and movements for social change will be conducted. Students will investigate local and international conflict, social movements and non-violent approaches to peace. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course includes a comparative survey of the social, political, economic and historical tenets and developments of contemporary political ideologies. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
Choose three credits from the following list
3
This is a survey course designed to introduce students to the cinematic arts of a particular national cinema and to encourage them to think globally. Emphasis will be given to internationally recognized filmmakers of foreign cinemas and their recent new directors. Students will watch and analyze numerous films. They will study the aesthetics of film language as well as the social and cultural conditions that produce the cinema. The course will encourage student understanding of the intellectual, spiritual and moral issues that unite people despite differences in time, place, language and culture. Specific film content may vary from term to term. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030 and the Humanities Area B General Education requirement.
This course will explore trends and influences in literature from World War II to the present. Contemporary literature will be examined as a reflection of the philosophy of modern life and as a reflection of the student's world. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
This course is designed to create an awareness of the ideas, techniques and historical relationships in world literature from the Enlightenment to the present. The Enlightenment, Romanticism, the 19th Century (Realism and Naturalism) and Modernism will be studied. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
Total Credits:
26
Note:

Textbook information will be available online for each term's courses 45 days prior to the first day of classes for the term.

Each course offered by Seminole State is listed alphabetically and organized by the course prefix, catalog number and description. The courses in this catalog are identified by prefixes and numbers that were assigned by Florida's Statewide Course Numbering System, a system used by all public postsecondary institutions in Florida and 32 non-public institutions. Seminole State controls the description, credit and content of its own courses.

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